technology

Flickr Photo/BagoGames (CC BY 2.0)

Ross Reynolds talks to Todd Bishop of Geekwire about Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella's 3,200 word, company-wide memo.

Bishop picked out one key section of the missive: Nadella’s pursuit of streamlining the company’s engineering processes and being more responsive to the market and customers’ demands.

I was always thankful that my parents didn't "leash me" at the mall or grocery store when I was a child — but you'll never guess what parents can strap on their kids nowadays.

LG Electronics introduced a device Wednesday called the KizON. Meant for those in preschool and primary school, it's essentially a kid-tracking wristband.

The group behind the initiative to legalize recreational marijuana in Oregon is now accepting bitcoin contributions.

A Washington Post analysis of data provided by Edward Snowden has revealed that nine out of 10 communications intercepted by the National Security Agency were from ordinary Internet users, not legally targeted foreigners. But the examination also showed that officials gleaned valuable intelligence from the wide net the agency cast.

Marcie Sillman talks with Andy Sellars, assistant director of Harvard's Digital Media Law Project, about what you can and can't say online.

Marcie Sillman talks to Todd Bishop, tech writer and co-founder of Geekwire about the growing tech industry in the Northwest and Facebook's secret study into manipulating the emotions of its users.

Ever wonder why children can so easily figure out how to work the TV remote? Or why they "totally get" apps on your smartphone faster than you? It turns out that young children may be more open-minded than adults when it comes to solving problems.

Lauren Kay has never met her therapist in person. The 24-year-old entrepreneur found it difficult to take time off work for appointments.

So she started seeing a psychotherapist online.

"It's definitely been different," she says. Kay, who lives in New York, found her counselor through an online therapy service called Pretty Padded Room. When it's time for an appointment, all she has to do is log in to the website, click a link and start video chatting.

The video game BioShock Infinite received widespread praise for having a rich narrative packed with philosophy when it debuted last year. The game sold millions of copies.

For one week back in 2012, Facebook scientists altered what appeared on the News Feed of more than 600,000 users. One group got mostly positive items; the other got mostly negative items.

Scientists then monitored the posts of those people and found that they were more negative if they received the negative News Feed and more positive if they received positive items.

Marcie Sillman talks with the Technology Access Foundation's David Harris about his idea to get more kids and teens of color interested in tech careers: the Central District Hackathon.

Imagine being able to walk into a public library and check out a Wi-Fi hot spot as if it were just another book. Soon, patrons in two major U.S. cities won't have to imagine it.

The public library systems in New York and Chicago won funding from the Knight Foundation to experiment with the idea of hot-spot lending. Both say they hope the move will help them expand Internet access among low-income families.

Among the great promises of the Internet were free expression and community — that you or I can make things and share them with ease, and that we can more easily connect with weirdos just like us.

Aereo, the company that lets subscribers watch TV stations' video that it routes onto the Internet, violates U.S. copyright law, the Supreme Court has ruled. The court's 6-3 decision reverses a lower court ruling on what has been a hotly contested issue.

A gun that fires only in the hands of its owner isn't science fiction anymore. A so-called smart gun is already on sale in Europe. But you won't find it on store shelves in this country — in part because of an obscure New Jersey law that's had unintended consequences for the rest of the nation.

Basically, the Childproof Handgun Law of 2002 says that once "personalized handguns are available" anywhere in the country, all handguns sold in New Jersey must be smart guns within 30 months.

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