technology

Children's personal information isn't supposed to be an online commodity. But whether kids are using Google apps at school or Internet-connected toys at home, they're generating a stream of data about themselves. And some advocates say that information can be collected too easily and sometimes, protected too poorly.

Remember net neutrality?

Right, it's that brain-flexing term that refers to the idea that phone and cable companies should treat all of the traffic on their networks equally. No blocking or slowing their competitors, and no fast lanes for companies that can pay more.

In fact, the term itself was so nerdy that it's been "re-branded" as Open Internet.

Updated 3:44 p.m. ET Dec. 8 to add an editor's note on Internet-connected phones and the definition of a landline.

Nearly half of U.S. homes don't have a landline and rely on cellphones instead, according to a federal report out this week.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg at TechCrunch Disrupt 2012.
Flickr Photo/JD Lasica (CC BY NC 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1N4lDVX

Bill Radke talks to Whitney Williams, director of the local charity consulting firm Williams Works, about Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's pledge to donate 99 percent of his shares to charitable causes — and how it compares to Seattle's own billionaire philanthropist, Bill Gates.

You couldn't look anywhere on Facebook without seeing it: friends, celebrities and complete strangers dumping buckets of ice water to raise awareness of ALS, a neurodegenerative illness also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

The 2014 Ice Bucket Challenge ended up raising more than $115 million for ALS research and reached an unprecedented bar for a charity social media campaign — unprecedented and inimitable.

Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. at KUOW Public Radio on Tuesday.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

A large statue of George Washington, the first U.S. president, looms large over the University of Washington’s main campus.

Should the statue’s inscription read “slave owner”? Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. believes so.

T-Mobile employees protest outside the company's headquarters in Bellevue.
Courtesy of Communication Workers of America

Jeannie Yandel speaks to Angela Agganis about her lawsuit against T-Mobile. She says the company forced her to sign a nondisclosure agreement after she reported being sexually harassed by her supervisor.  

Bill Radke talks to John Cook, writer and co-founder of Geekwire, about three Seattle startups that are innovators in their field: Arivale, Pluto VR and OfferUp, which are all on Geekwire's "Seattle 10."

Amazon has released a glimpse of what its much-anticipated drone deliveries could look like, although it warns the service is still very much in a testing phase.

The Washington state Capitol campus could soon be a no-fly-zone for drones. The agency that oversees the 486-acre campus is considering a strict ban.

The Consumer Technology Association forecasts that 400,000 drones will be sold in the United States this holiday season. That's not to mention the commercial drones being developed by Google (now known as Alphabet), Amazon, Wal-Mart and others.

If you've ever been vaccinated, you may have seen the nurse head out of the room to go to the refrigerator to retrieve your injection. That's because most vaccines must be refrigerated during travel and storage or they lose their effectiveness.

Vaccines typically need what's known as a "cold chain." From the point of manufacture to the place where they're used, they need to be kept within a narrow temperature range, typically between 35 and 46 degrees Fahrenheit.

Street sign on Microsoft campus in Redmond, Washington.
Flickr Photo/Todd A Bishop (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1MGSP5J

Bill Radke talks with University of Washington history professor Margaret O'Mara about the impact of Microsoft on the economy and culture of the Pacific Northwest.

Two major terrorist attacks happened last week. One killed at least 129 people in Paris, France. Another killed at least 43 people in Beirut, Lebanon.

ISIS claimed responsibility for both attacks, but the global support and attention given to each incident varied widely.

To quantify the difference in online attention since the attack in Beirut happened, PRI has done some simple estimations using several free online tools. The evidence unfortunately has confirmed the observation above.

Tim Porter and Matt McIlwain of Madrona Venture Group, a heavy funder of Seattle's cloud startups
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Seattle has become the center of a giant, invisible, global business, with Amazon and Microsoft as its core.

That business is the cloud, now estimated to be worth more than $15 billion to those two companies, which have become world leaders.

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