technology

Flickr Photo/Teresa Boardman (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Marcie Sillman talks with Steven Johnson, author of "How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World," about the technological innovations that led to widespread clean water in America, despite the E. coli in Mercer Island's drinking water this month.

Ross Reynolds talks with journalist Cyrus Farivar about untraceable, homemade guns. Farivar is senior business editor for the technology website Ars Technica.

Nicholas Carr's book "The Glass Cage"

Ross Reynolds talks to author Nicholas Carr about his new book "The Glass Cage: Automation And Us."

Ross Reynolds speaks with Sara Laschever, co-author of  the book, "Women Don't Ask," about some strategies for women to become more comfortable in salary negotiations. 

At a conference on Thursday for women in tech, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella advised women who aren't comfortable asking for a raise to have "faith that the system will actually give you the right raises as you go along. That's good karma. It will come back." Nadella has since apologized for his comments, and added that, upon reflection, he realized that the best advice is, "If you think you deserve a raise, you should just ask.

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella.
Flickr Photo/Heisenberg Media (CC BY-NC-ND)

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella said Thursday women are better off not asking for a raise because they’ll be rewarded in the long term. The U.S. Supreme Court considers when workers are on the clock. Plus, Amazon wants to test drones, a Seattle church protests pot next door and Bill Radke recalls the musical ride of Paul Revere with Knute Berger, Eli Sanders, Joni Balter and Luke Burbank.

Ross Reynolds talks with GeekWire co-founder and editor, Todd Bishop, about the latest in tech news.

When Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos unveiled plans for aerial drone delivery of packages last year, many observers dismissed the concept as science fiction or pie-in-the-sky.

If your image of a computer programmer is a young man, there's a good reason: It's true. Recently, many big tech companies revealed how few of their female employees worked in programming and technical jobs. Google had some of the highest rates: 17 percent of its technical staff is female.

It wasn't always this way. Decades ago, it was women who pioneered computer programming — but too often, that's a part of history that even the smartest people don't know.

Both Oregon and Washington’s state forestry departments had hoped to try out drones this summer to provide reconnaissance at wildfire scenes. But neither firefighting agency managed to pull it off. Now both plan to try again next year.

Marcie Sillman talks to biotech writer Luke Timmerman about the influx of money to cancer immunotherapy companies like VentriRx, which just received $50 million to increase their research efforts.

Amsterdam is famous for its laissez-faire attitude about extracurricular activities, its beautiful canals and of course, its bicycles. Now, even if you only have a layover at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport, you can get in some pedaling, and power your phone and other devices at the same time.

A drone test range in northeastern Oregon launched its first flight Tuesday.

Vermont is known for its green pastures, farmsteads and roads free of billboards. The founders of the new social network Ello live in the state, and they want to bring Vermont-like serenity to the Internet.

"We set out to prove that a social network will survive and thrive that doesn't have a business model of selling ads to its users," says CEO and co-founder Paul Budnitz.

Micrsoft technology
Flickr Photo/Fabien Lavocat (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Todd Bishop about the new Microsoft Windows 10 software and what it means for our local economy.

The walls are lined with robots and movie posters for Star Wars and Back to the Future. But this is no 1980s nerd den. It's the technology lab at Westside Neighborhood School in Los Angeles, and the domain of its ed-tech coordinator, Don Fitz-Roy.

"So we're gonna be talking about digital citizenship today."

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