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A group of recent studies on technology in education, across a wide range of real-world settings, have come up far short of a ringing endorsement.

The studies include research on K-12 schools and higher ed, both blended learning and online, and show results ranging from mixed to negative. A deeper look into these reports gives a sense that, even as computers become ubiquitous in classrooms, there's a lot we still don't know — or at least that we're not doing to make them effective tools for learning.

First, a quick overview of the studies and their results:

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Courtesy of the Diamond Foundry

Silicon Valley is a playground of sci-fi wonders: Driverless cars. Virtual reality arcades. The robots that will soon replace your dog.

I’m here to check out the latest: A diamond mine the size of a passenger van that can be controlled with an iPhone.

When you sink $40 million into a state-of-the art digital two-way radio system, you don’t expect to hear complaints. But delays, dead air and garbled transmissions have bedeviled a new Washington State Patrol radio system.

Todd Bishop of GeekWire
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bill Radke talks to Geekwire's Todd Bishop about Apple's purchase of the Seattle company Turi and what that means for our region. 

There was a time when people went to bars to talk to other people, maybe even meet someone new. But that was in the BC era — before cellphones.

"I've been in the pub industry for a long time, and progressively it's become less and less social and more and more antisocial," Steve Tyler, the owner of the Gin Tub in Sussex, England, tells NPR's Scott Simon.

To be human is to be constantly at war between our lofty goals and our immediate impulses.

Future Me wants me to run five miles. Right Now Me wants a cookie.

Unfortunately, that totally understandable tendency is one factor that can stop people from completing their education:

  • Ninety-three percent of high school seniors say they intend to go to college, but 1 in 10 of those never apply.
  • Between 10 and 15 percent of those who are admitted never register for classes.

Kim Malcolm talks with Melissa Crowe, research director for the Puget Sound Business Journal about the challenges faced by victims of revenge porn.


Baltimore County police shot and killed Korryn Gaines, a 23-year-old black woman, after an hours-long standoff on Monday — during which Facebook and Instagram, at police request, temporarily shut down Gaines' accounts.

New York Bans Registered Sex Offenders From Pokémon Go

Aug 2, 2016

At least 22 percent of Pokémon Go's millions of users are minors, according to a Survey Monkey study obtained by Forbes. With that many kids and teens playing the game — which is rated for users 9 years old and up — they become potential targets for child sex offenders.

A few years ago, Silicon Valley engineer Bindu Reddy was raising money for a new startup. An investor offered to contribute — not because of what she was trying to do, but because she was a woman.

That rubbed Reddy the wrong way, and she wrote about it — then the backlash began.

Marissa Mayer will go down in history as the last CEO of Yahoo. The great Internet pioneer is having its core business auctioned off to Verizon. When Mayer came on board four years ago, Yahoo was in a critical, make-or-break moment. It needed a decisive leader.

But in interviews with Mayer and people who worked with her, a different truth emerges: The CEO treated Yahoo more like a think tank than a sinking ship.

The trip had mechanical setbacks, and the plane's average speed would be legal on many American streets. But when the Solar Impulse aircraft touched down in Abu Dhabi in the early morning darkness Tuesday, it successfully completed a round-the-world voyage using only solar power.

Swiss pilots Bertrand Piccard and André Borschberg took turns flying the single-seat aircraft that began its trip on March 9 of 2015, flying more than 26,700 miles in a total of 17 stages (23 days) as they soared under the sun's power and then glided through the night.

Verizon is buying Yahoo for $4.8 billion, acquiring its "core Internet assets" — search, email, finance, news, sports, Tumblr, Flickr — in essence writing the final chapter of one of the longest-running Internet companies.

"My name is Becki," says a young woman standing in a convention center turned comic book bazaar. Then she flips a mane of orange hair and launches into Scottish accent. "And today, I am Merida from Brave."

This year at San Diego Comic-Con, one of the biggest phenomena isn't just inside the convention center, it's all around. Yes, there are billboards and installations trumpeting things like Doctor Strange and Fear the Walking Dead. But the crowds of people here aren't looking up; they're mostly staring down at their phones, playing Pokémon Go.

People who live in the country who want to play Pokémon Go have a problem.

There are a lot of techie reasons why Pokémon stops are found more often in cities. But generally speaking, where there are more players or people there is usually more Pokémon activity on the game -- it just works better.

Some players in an emerging technology industry in central Washington state are about to face higher electric bills. That’s because a major utility wants to protect itself from the uncertainties surrounding the trade in virtual currencies such as bitcoin.

The thing about the tech industry and employee diversity reports is they can feel like Groundhog Day:

  • Google, 2014: "Put simply, Google is not where we want to be when it comes to diversity."
  • Google, 2016: "We saw encouraging signs of progress in 2015, but we're still far from where we need to be."

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about why Silicon Valley is wading into presidential politics with an open letter to Donald Trump.

More than 2 tons of supplies and gear are speeding toward the International Space Station, after a SpaceX Falcon rocket launched early Monday from Cape Canaveral, Fla. The cargo includes a new port that will standardize how spacecraft connect to the station.

When Julian Castro assumed the post of Housing and Urban Development secretary in 2014, the U.S. government already had a few programs aimed at expanding Americans' access to the Internet. It's the sort of thing that is paramount to success in the modern economy, long advocated by President Obama and other government officials.

A new Seattle-based app helps part-time workers swap shifts.
Brie Ripley

Kim Malcolm speaks with Bloomberg News Tech Reporter Dina Bass about a new Seattle-based app, Shyft. The app is designed to help part-time shift workers trade schedules with other workers. 


Editor's note: This story contains language that some may find offensive.

Flickr Photo/scottlum (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/rgPsj9
Flickr Photo/scottlum (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/rgPsj9

Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, Laquan McDonald, Walter Scott. 

"These are all shootings that could've been prevented," said Norm Stamper, former chief of the Seattle Police Department.
 

There are some big companies out there that you've probably never heard of, that know more about you than you can imagine.

They're called data brokers, and they collect all sorts of information — names, addresses, income, where you go on the Internet and who you connect with online. That information is then sold to other companies. There are few regulations governing these brokers.

It's been an eventful weekend for Pokémon trainers — even without Team Rocket around.

After being released Wednesday, the mobile app Pokémon Go is currently the top downloaded free app, and the top grossing app, in both the Apple and Android stores.

DoNotPay, the service helping folks get out of parking tickets, is coming soon to Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Mark Lyon (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/99xWhv

Bill Radke speaks to Stanford student Joshua Browder about his service DoNotPay that helps people get parking tickets dismissed with the help from a "lawyerbot."

DoNotPay is available in London and New York City, and it will be coming to Seattle in September. 

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José Cabezas/Reuters

Millions of Salvadorans, including many in the country's poorest neighborhoods, have cellphones. 

But when those impoverished Salvadorans are victims of abuse at the hands of police, few dare to use their mobile devices to record the misconduct. 

Why not?

Salvadoran American youth advocate Susan Cruz asked young residents of the heavily policed San Salvador suburb of Soyapango if they would use their phones to document police wrongdoing. 

Independent radio producer Brie Ripley.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Bill Radke asks independent radio producer and millennial Brie Ripley for help deciphering a slang-heavy invite from a Microsoft recruiter calling interns 'bae" for an event involving 'hella noms' and 'getting lit on a Monday night'. 

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Mauricio Fidalgo/Reuters

Residents of Rio de Janeiro’s Maré complex of poor favela neighborhoods were too terrified to walk down the street.

Nighttime police raids and daytime shootouts between police and a drug gang last week killed three civilians, wounded two officers and kept people shut inside a classroom for hours while bullets whizzed outside.

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