technology

Aereo, the company that lets subscribers watch TV stations' video that it routes onto the Internet, violates U.S. copyright law, the Supreme Court has ruled. The court's 6-3 decision reverses a lower court ruling on what has been a hotly contested issue.

A gun that fires only in the hands of its owner isn't science fiction anymore. A so-called smart gun is already on sale in Europe. But you won't find it on store shelves in this country — in part because of an obscure New Jersey law that's had unintended consequences for the rest of the nation.

Basically, the Childproof Handgun Law of 2002 says that once "personalized handguns are available" anywhere in the country, all handguns sold in New Jersey must be smart guns within 30 months.

Wikipedia Illustration/Tom-b (CC BY-SA)

David Hyde talks with Matthew Prince, CEO of CloudFlare, about what he says is the fastest growing cyber attack sweeping the nation: distributed denial of service, or DDoS.

Flickr Photo/Laia Ros (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Slate writer Katy Waldman about the new trend in activism called clicktivism.

From Wikipedia

Here’s the plot: A man suffering from dystonia – a neurological disorder that causes twisting and abnormal postures – goes to a doctor. The doctor gives the man local anesthesia, drills into his head, inserts spaghetti-like electrodes and then hooks him up to a pacemaker to send electrical currents into his brain.

University of Washington, Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence

When you do an image search on the web, you might find what you're looking for. Those searches use captions and other text around pictures to give you results. But what if a computer could recognize a horse because it was shaped like a horse? That's what a new program called LEVAN can do.

Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington professor Joe Janes about online reputation management.

Flickr Photo/Andreas Eldh (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde interviews author David Zweig about his new book, "Invisibles: The Power Of Anonymous Work In An Age of Relentless Self-Promotion."

Marcie Sillman talks to Todd Bishop about Amazon's new phone and the company's Prime music service. Also, tehy discuss  Seattle a booming tech city? The New York Times thinks so.

Power To The Health Data Geeks

Jun 16, 2014

A computer programmer and a kid in a Batman suit walk into a pancake house ...

It sounds like a joke, but it really happened, and now the programmer — Dave Vockell — has a new product to bring to market. It's an app to help seniors talk to their doctors about medical care.

"Like all great health care breakthroughs, it happened at the International House of Pancakes," he says, half-jokingly.

Bellevue, Washington-based Expedia just announced that it will start accepting bitcoin for hotel bookings. The online travel site is embracing the volatile, virtual currency on what it calls a "test-and-learn" basis.

Flickr Photo/Nick Bonzey (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to University of Washington law professor Ryan Calo about the Federal Aviation Administration's decision to allow BP to use drones in Alaska.

Flickr Photo/Eric P. (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Bruce Katz, vice president of the Brookings Institute, about the infrastructure behind having an "innovation district," and the benefits one can provide.

Flickr Photo/Sam Agnew

The Obama administration must restore trust in U.S. technology companies and uphold America’s fundamental liberties, Microsoft’s chief counsel wrote in a strongly-worded blog post.

A year ago this week, The Guardian and The Washington Post first published stories that came out of revelations from NSA leaker Edward Snowden.

The leaks brought new focus onto U.S. intelligence agencies themselves — and how they keep their secrets safe. The same themes come up in a new spy thriller from author and veteran Post columnist David Ignatius.

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