technology

Amazon.com logo
Flickr Photo/Guillermo Esteves (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Todd Bishop, co-founder of GeekWire, about Amazon's affect on brick and mortar retail.

Rhinos in Kwazulu Natal, South Africa. Seattle company is bioengineering rhino horns to cut down on poaching.`
Flickr Photo/Ian Turk (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Pembient co-founder Matthew Markus. The local biotech startup is bioengineering rhino horn powder with the hopes of curbing poaching in Africa.

Today marks the return of a cult public television hit — Foyle's War. It previously appeared as part of PBS's big Sunday night Masterpiece lineup, but it won't be on TV tonight. For now, viewers will have to stream the show digitally. Acorn, the company that produces Foyle's War, has embarked on something of a Netflix strategy — raising the question of whether a niche pay portal can be a going concern.

It’s long been against the law to text and drive in Washington, but the rules would get much stricter under a proposal introduced Wednesday in the legislature.

Waze, the popular navigation app boasting more than 50 million users worldwide, has a new critic: police officers. Over the past few weeks, law enforcement officials have been urging the app and its owner, Google, to disable a feature that allows users to report when they've spotted a police officer, in real time, for all other Waze users to see.

Sergio Kopelev, a reserve sheriff in Orange County, Calif., is one of the law enforcement officials behind the push to remove Waze's police tracker. He says he first discovered the feature through his family.

Dragon, SpaceX's version of an astronaut taxi to the International Space Station. The company announced it would be opening up a new office in Seattle for 1,000 employees.  Boeing is also getting in the space technology game with a rival spacecraft.
Wikipedia Photo/NASA

Marcie Sillman talks with GeekWire co-founder Todd Bishop about the new frontiers of space technology and what that industry will mean for Seattle. 

Sales of small, camera-equipped drones are soaring. Aside from air safety issues, these remotely-piloted aircraft can raise privacy concerns if they fly uninvited over your backyard or past your bedroom windows.

Author Andrew Keen.
Flickr Photo/SHARE Conference (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to author Andrew Keen about his new book, "The Internet Is Not The Answer." 

Microsoft store
Flickr Photo/Joe Wilcox (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Todd Bishop, editor and co-founder of GeekWire, about what's new in the Windows 10 operating system.

Flickr Photo/Douglas Woods (CC-BY-NC), edit by KUOW/Kara McDermott

Ross Reynolds talks with Cheezburger Networks' CEO, Ben Huh, about net neutrality and what that means for Washington business.

In Silicon Valley's youth-obsessed culture, 40-year-olds get plastic surgery to fit in. But IDEO, the firm that famously developed the first mouse for Apple, has a 90-year-old designer on staff.

Barbara Beskind says her age is an advantage.

This story is the latest in NPR's Cities Project.

Fifteen minutes north of the iconic Vegas Strip is the economically depressed downtown Las Vegas, a much-forgotten part of town. It's also an area of tremendous change in recent years, since it's the heart of tech billionaire Tony Hsieh's ambitious Downtown Project — an effort that's part urban revitalization, part social experiment.

Three years in, it's not going as quickly as he expected.

Twelve years into a struggle with bulimia and anorexia, Jessie Joachim says she still feels guilty whenever she tells her therapist out loud that she has purged a meal.

Amazon's "Transparent" received two Golden Globes on Sunday.
Facebook Photo/Transparent

Marcie Sillman talks with Todd Bishop, GeekWire co-founder, about Amazon's big win at the Golden Globes. They also discuss the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. 

A piece of the original Antikythera Mechanism. Divers found the first pieces off the coast of the Greek island Antikythera in 1901.
Wikimedia Commons

Jeannie Yandel talks with University of Puget Sound professor James Evans about the Antikythera Mechanism, which is believed to be the world's first computer. Evans and a colleague recently found the mechanism may be as old as 205 BC, which is 50-100 years older than originally thought.

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