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The Seattle Times
Flickr Photo/Mr T In DC

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton considers Burt Lancaster, Frances Farmer, Vivien Leigh and others in the movie business who would have turned 100 this year. Geekwire's Todd Bishop reviews what's happening in tech, including a dust-up between Microsoft and online advertisers over a new browser privacy setting, rumors of an "iWatch" coming from Apple, and the new digital paywall at The Seattle Times.

In its bid to reshape itself for the future, Yahoo is returning to a workplace culture of the tech industry's past. The Internet giant has reportedly notified its employees they'll no longer be allowed to work from home.

Sony rolled out their next generation video game console, the PS4, this week. But gaming has steadily been moving away from consoles to phones. What’s the future for video games? Ross Reynolds talks to Universtiy of Washington Professor Ken Rufo.

Cyberattacks on dozens of American companies have been traced to an area on the outskirts of Shanghai that houses a Chinese military unit, according to a report out Tuesday by Mandiant, a U.S. cybersecurity company.

The 60-page document, first reported by The New York Times, says the group behind the attacks — nicknamed "Comment Crew" — is the most prolific the company has ever tracked and has been hacking U.S. companies since at least 2006.

Mandiant says the hackers' real identity is Unit 61398 of China's People's Liberation Army, or PLA.

Berkman Center for Internet & Society

The Mechanical Turk was a fake chess playing robot that fooled Napoleon and Benjamin Franklin. Today the Mechanical Turk is a service Amazon provides, linking workers with people who need tasks done. Some pay as little as a penny. Critics call Mechanical Turk a digital sweatshop. Ross Reynolds talks with Jonathan Zittrain, co-director of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School, about working for points, Mechanical Turk and artificial-artificial intelligence.

Prime minister Stephen Harper
(AP Photo/ Manish Swarup)

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper tweets about his cat and pet chinchilla. Film critic Robert Horton discusses the renowned French comedian Pierre Etaix. The Northwest Film Forum is showing his five films this week as a tribute to his comedic impact on cinema. Then, Todd Bishop talks tech business news and latest on Microsoft’s new tablet.

Joi Ito / Flickr

Ross Reynolds interviewed Boing Boing blogger, journalist, science fiction author, and digital rights activist Cory Doctorow. Below are highlights from his interview on The Conversation

Boeing 787
AP Photo/Stephan Savoia / Associated Press

The Boeing Co. said today that there has been no negative financial impact as a result of the FAA's grounding of the 787 Dreamliner. The news dampened a wave of speculation over the potential cost of its safety troubles with its 787 which was grounded two weeks ago.

Matthew Yglesias / Flickr

Matthew Yglesias is a business and economics correspondent for Slate Magazine. In March he published his latest book titled "The Rent is Too Damn High." Today Ross talks to him about everything from Patty Murray to Spotify to policies on immigration.

Microsoft TechNet blog

In the old days, when Microsoft Corp. unveiled new software you might have gone to the store, paid for it once, and brought it home in a box.

But with Microsoft’s new service unveiled Tuesday, Office 365, the box is gone. It’s been replaced by a digital subscription that allows you to get almost everything you need from the web. In a promotional video, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer said the service offers a “complete office in the cloud,” which he touted as a major leap forward.

KUOW Photo/Amber Cortes

What kind of record are we leaving behind for the next generation? Physical objects get damaged in floods and fires, or simply get moldy in the basement. Think you're better off going digital? Think again. Hard drives crash. Compact discs deteriorate. And cloud-based computing companies get shuttered or go out of business.

Our personal records seem so vulnerable. It leaves one wondering: Are we leaving any kind of a lasting record? Ross talks with archivist John Bolcer and a digital media expert Cathy Marshall. Do you want to protect something of yours for the future? Today's guests will tell you how.

Eddie Codel / Flickr

Drunk drivers, speeding tickets and parking could be a thing of the past. Google is developing driverless cars that use sensors to transport people safely and efficiently to any location. They claim driverless cars will reduce traffic accidents by 90 percent. Does it sound like something from science fiction? Ross finds out by talking to Forbes Magazine contributor Chunka Mui.

Are Traditional Libraries In Jeopardy?

Jan 28, 2013
emdot / Flickr

Thousands of librarians are gathering in Seattle for the annual ALA Midwinter Meeting, and they've got a lot to talk about. Ross Reynolds spoke with ALA President Maureen Sullivan about the future of libraries and how they survive in a digital age.

marc falardeau / Flickr

The Federal Trade Commission reports that in 2011, there were 4,853 complaints of identity theft filed in Washington state. Some of the victims included elderly citizens, medical patients, and even foster children. And the FTC complaints don’t include online data theft.

charred battery
NTSB Photo

The Boeing 787’s lithium-ion batteries are now the subject of intense scrutiny. The Federal Aviation Administration has grounded the entire 787 fleet in the US until it can get to the root cause of a fire hazard involving the batteries.

Steve Ballmer and Paul Jacobs
AP Photo/Julie Jacobson

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada, film critic Robert Horton joins us with a look at the movies, and Geekwire's Todd Bishop talks Windows 8, Amazon's new mp3 offer and the region's top tech startups.

Steven Senne / AP Photo

Futurist and author Ray Kurzweil thinks we’re headed for a future where machines will become more like people, people will integrate computers and machines into their bodies, and we will live longer — much longer. Ross Reynolds talks with Ray Kurzweil about his latest book, "How to Create a Mind."

UltraSlo1 / Flickr

According to a new study nearly 1 in 3 pedestrians is distracted by a mobile device like a smart phone when walking into high-risk intersections. Only 1 in 4 looked both ways before crossing the street.  

David Hyde talks with Dr. Beth Ebel who was the lead author on the study. She directs the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research center at the University of Washington.

Seattle is launching a pilot project to bring ultra high-speed broadband service the city. The city is working with the University of Washington and the tech company, Gigabit Squared, to launch the new service.

There will be 12 “demonstration fiber projects” in neighborhoods around the city. Ross Reynolds talks with Ed Lazowska, who holds the Bill & Melinda Gates Chair in computer science and engineering at the UW, about the pilot program.

LinkedIn profile photos

Ross Reynolds interviews two prominent Seattle investors about business and politics.  Nick Hanauer was the first non-family investor in Amazon.  He’s currently a venture capitalist with Second Avenue Partners and a major Democratic donor and activist involved with a variety of causes.  Richard Barton is a former Microsoft executive and the founder of the travel website Expedia and the real estate site Zillow.  He also supports a number of philanthropic causes, in part through the Barton Family Foundation.  

Todd Bishop
Flickr Photo/Randy Stewart

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada, film critic Robert Horton looks at actors and directors who did well for themselves in 2012, and Geekwire’s Todd Bishop reviews the latest in tech, including a new Seattle men's store that wants to use technology to change the way you shop.

Leafly.com
courtesy/Leafly.com

Marijuana has been historically cast as a dangerous drug for outcasts and societal dropouts. But with the passage of I-502, marijuana is going mainstream. A Seattle web entrepreneur is building tools for the masses to bring marijuana – and its users – into the 21st century.

Vaughn Palmer
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton surveys the new crop of Thanksgiving movie releases (including a remake of 1984's "Red Dawn"). Geekwire’s Todd Bishop reviews e-readers and tablets with the holiday shopping season in mind.

election party napkins
Flickr Photo/LaMenta3 (CC BY-NC-ND)

Hanson Hosein, director of the digital media program at the University of Washington, recommends top websites  to watch for election results and commentary on election night.

Hanson's Top 10 Resources For Election Night:

Flickr Photo/Cyprien

Many people are using their phone to find restaurants, and when they do, often they’re using UrbanSpoon based here in Seattle. Ross Reynolds speaks with Patrick O’Donnell, co-founder of UrbanSpoon.

On the cusp of the release of Windows 8,  Ross Reynolds talks to New York Times personal tech columnist, David Pogue, about the latest software and the future of Microsoft. 

A new online Seattle startup called Leafly is targeting medical marijuana patients.  The website (and mobile apps) feature information about medical cannabis strains and dispensaries based on tens of thousands of patient-generated reviews.  Ross Reynolds talks with Leafly’s CEO Brendan Kennedy about how the site works.

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton talks zombie movies and zombie metaphors. Then, we’ll get a look at what's happening in tech with Geekwire’s Todd Bishop.

As information becomes more accessible and more easily distributed, are secrets becoming a thing of the past? Ross Reynolds talks with Andy Greenberg about his new book, “This Machine Kills Secrets: How Wikileaks, Cypherpunks, and Hactivists Aim to Free the World’s Information.” 

Alex Alben
Yoyostring Media

Former RealNetworks executive Alex Alben says digital technology is leading to more connection and more alienation.  Alben talks to Ross Reynolds about what the rise of digital technology means for the future of America. 

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