technology

If you're trying out for a job in sales, the person who judges your pitch may not be a person — it could be a computer.

Job recruitment is the newest frontier in automated labor, where algorithms are choosing who's the right fit to sell fast food or handle angry cable customers, by sizing up the human candidates' voices.

When Online Rants Become Criminal Acts

Mar 20, 2015
Flickr Photo/Matthew (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with David Green, First Amendment attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, about social media rants and when online comments cross the line from hyperbole to a criminal act. 

A new technology called CRISPR could allow scientists to alter the human genetic code for generations. That's causing some leading biologists and bioethicists to sound an alarm.

Poop Water: Why You Should Drink It

Mar 19, 2015
Bill Gates challenges "Tonight Show" host Jimmy Fallon to guess which is the poop water made in the Omni Processor.
Screenshot from YouTube

Ross Reynolds speaks with Peter Janicki, the Washington-based creator of the Omni Processor, a machine which turns human waste into clean drinking water.

Also, Reynolds speaks with psychologist Carol Nemeroff about the psychological aversion many people have to recycled water.

When a 4-year-old comes home from pre-K proudly announcing that she spent her "choice time" playing on the computer, what's a parent to do?

Computer technology keyboard
Flickr Photo/Anonymous Account (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Deven McGraw, partner at the law firm Manatt, Phelps and Philips, about why medical data is so valuable to malicious hackers and what the industry needs to do about it.

Cockroaches are widely despised. They're attracted to filth. They frighten people, even give them nightmares.

But for a team of scientists at Texas A&M University, the roach is a hero: the first animal that humans might successfully transform into a robot, a hybrid of insect and machine that we can send anywhere to be our eyes and ears.

The Perfect Roach

Professor Hong Liang opens the door to a small laboratory with hundreds, maybe thousands, of cockroaches. It's not for the faint of heart.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Bruce Schneier, author of the new book, "Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles To Capture Your Data and Control Your World."

Participants at the 5th annual Compassion Research Day at Facebook's headquarters in Menlo Park, California. Facebook unveiled new tools on Feb. 25 to help prevent suicide.
Courtesy of Forefront/Katie Simmons

Marcie Sillman talks with Jennifer Stuber, director of Forefront, a suicide prevention organization at the University of Washington, about their partnership with Facebook.

Also, we hear from Stephen Miller, Forefront's operation's manager, about his own experience with Facebook and suicide. 

Idaho’s long stretches of open highway could be testing grounds for driverless cars under a bill the state Senate passed Thursday.

smart phone texting app
Flickr Photo/AdamFagen (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Ellen Selkie, who works in the Adolescent Medicine division at Seattle Children's Hospital, about her recent study on the effects of college cyber bullying. 

Customers line up at Starbucks, all the way outside.
Flickr Photo/oinonio (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Starbucks is set to expand mobile ordering to its Pacific Northwest stores. KUOW's Kim Malcolm talks with retail analyst Brian Sozzi of Belus Capital Advisors about why the not-just-coffee company wants to move you out of the line and onto your phone.

Marcie Sillman talks with GeekWire co-founder Todd Bishop about Apple's big event on wearable technology. 

The free dating app Tinder has launched a paid subscription service called Tinder Plus.

The paid tier offers more functions than the free app, but it comes with a catch: users over age 30 are being charged twice as much as younger subscribers for the same service.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson takes a look at Tinder Plus with Jason Bellini of The Wall Street Journal.

RP's husband works in the Seattle area on an H-1B  visa. They lived together in Seattle for a year and a half before RP returned to work in India, due to visa restrictions.
KUOW Photo/Harsha Vadlamani

Washington is one of the top states that brings in high-skilled foreign workers, filling thousands of jobs every year.

This week, those workers got some long-awaited news from the federal government: A blanket rule that barred their spouses from working will soon be lifted.

Pages