technology

Internet Surveillance
2:16 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

How To Cover Your Digital Footprints

Credit Flickr Photo/rafolio

Want to evade the prying eyes of the NSA? Not that you have anything to hide; but even if you did, covering your digital footprints is complicated business. Just because you delete that racy video you uploaded to YouTube doesn't mean it's gone forever.

Realistically, no one can become a digital ghost. Your personal data is like a child you once clothed and fed; a child who has now left home and begun telling embarrassing stories about you to people you don't know.

There are methods, however, for protecting your reputation among regular people without NSA security clearance. Methods that involve obfuscating rather than obliterating your online legacy.

Full list of stories on KUOW Presents, June 12:

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Smart Phone Theft
10:52 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Tech Columnist Monica Guzman On Privacy And "Halfalogue"

A "halfalogue" is the one-sided part of the conversation you overhear when someon is on the phone, which can be unavoidable in public places.
Flickr Photo/Emiliano

 According to the Pew Research Center, the number of Americans with smart phones has just exceeded the halfway point. But more fancy phones could mean more cell phone theft. A recent Harris Poll showed that one out of every 10 mobile phone users has had their phone stolen at some point.

Seattle Times Tech columnist Monica Guzman had an article in the Sunday paper about smart phone theft specifically. She’s also a writer for GeekWire, and she appears regularly on The Conversation to talk about the latest tech news. This time she discusses cell phones and “halfalogue” with David Hyde.

Alternative Transportation
11:51 am
Wed June 5, 2013

Lyft, Uber And SideCar: Not Your Father’s Cabs

A Lyft car is always very recognizable by its bright pink mustache, but is that enought to compete with the traditional taxi service?
Flickr Photo/Liza Sperling

 Taxi cabs have a new breed of competitors. New companies like Lyft, Uber and Sidecar give smartphone users the ability to reserve a ride through an app on their phone. Some of the companies use private car owners as their main drivers. Will traditional taxis fall by the wayside? How are these new companies regulated? Ross Reynolds talks with KUOW’s transportation reporter, Derek Wang.  

Patent Battles
5:26 pm
Tue June 4, 2013

Bellevue-Based Intellectual Ventures Now Targeting Financial Firms

Intellectual Ventures co-founder Nathan Myhrvold giving a TED Talk in 2010.
Flickr Photo/Red Maxwell

After numerous high-profile lawsuits against tech companies, a Bellevue-based patent company is now setting its sights on the financial industry.

On Tuesday, Intellectual Ventures announced it has filed lawsuits against two banks, JP Morgan Chase and Fifth Third Bank, for patent infringement. This is Intellectual Ventures’ second round of lawsuits targeting financial firms in the past week. On May 29, the company filed suit against First National Bank of Omaha and PNC.

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Internet Privacy
12:04 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

How Are You Being Watched?

Flickr Photo/g4ll4is

You are under surveillance when you go online. The information gatherers include the government, advertising companies and brokers who sell your data. Christopher Soghoian, chief technologist for the national ACLU, explains that the constantly updating world of technology has  also changed the government's ability to spy Internet communications and mobile telephones.  

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The Fine Print
12:05 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

New Documentary About Those Terms And Conditions You Signed

Everyone who uses a computer these days likely agrees to many "terms and conditions" agreements every year. But what are you really signing? Ross Reynolds interviews director Cullen Hoback, who takes a closer look at questions of privacy and consumer rights in a new documentary.    

Zeppelin Comeback
1:26 pm
Thu May 30, 2013

A New Kind Of Airship May Herald Return To The Age Of Dirigibles

The Aeroscraft.
Credit Aeros

The 1920s and 1930s are sometimes called "the age of the dirigible." Dirigibles were giant, steerable blimps and zeppelins, and they used to be a popular way to transport crowds of people from place to place. But then there was the fiery Hindenburg disaster. And during wars airplanes could easily shoot them down. After that airships were pretty much reduced to flying above football games and other kinds of surveillance.

Audio from a broadcast of the Hindenburg disaster in 1937

A Persistent Problem Overcome

Dirigibles never regained popularity because of a basic problem: they could only dock at special places where they could be tied down. Otherwise, they'd spring up into the air the moment you off loaded the cargo.

Now engineers have overcome that problem by simply compressing the helium upon landing. It's such a simple fix that its inventors are kicking themselves for not having thought of it sooner, and because dirigibles can lift extremely heavy loads much more efficiently than airplanes, the new airship's inventors believe we could see a new age of dirigibles.

Full list of stories from KUOW Presents, May 30:

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Charging Station Delays
12:29 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Where Are The Electric Car Charging Stations?

Flickr Photo/Fifth World Art

 You can’t drive your electric car if you can’t plug in and recharge, and the build-out on electric car chargers is behind schedule. Ross Reynolds talks with WSDOT's Jeff Doyle about the gaps in the grid for electric car charging. 

Gaming
10:54 am
Tue May 21, 2013

What Does The New Xbox Mean For Microsoft’s Future?

The Xbox 360 conroller, pictured, will get some upgrades though the shape will stay largely the same for the new Xbox One.
Flickr Photo/mybroetchen

 Microsoft's new Xbox is being unveiled today at a live event in Redmond. With features like video streaming, this Xbox’s got more than games. But what does it mean for the future of the company? Ross Reynolds talks to Ian Sherr, reporter for The Wall Street Journal.

Internet Fluency
11:33 am
Mon May 20, 2013

Can Washington State Solve The Digital Literacy Divide?

Flickr Photo/espensorvik (CC-BY-NC-ND)

 An estimated 1 in 6 Washingtonians don’t use the Internet. Ross Reynolds speaks with Zach Leverenz of Connect2Compete, which offers free digital literacy training. 

Seattle Start-ups
11:56 am
Fri May 10, 2013

GeekWire's John Cook: Seattle's Start-up Businesses Get A Boost

John Cook, Co-founder of Geekwire
Credit John Cook

Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn announced a new start-up business initiative Thursday May 9  to support and boost technology business start-ups in Seattle. Technology reporter and GeekWire co-founder John Cook was part of the advisory group that aided the city’s process.

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Education In America
12:12 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Smart Enough To Get Into College, Not Smart Enough To Go?

Flickr Photo/Ted Major

Nearly half of all US undergraduates show up to their first day of class unprepared for the rigors of college life. Many of these students require extra education to ready them for their college courses.

These extra classes cost time and money, leading students to drop out or pile on additional debt. To solve this, some colleges are turning to the fast-growing supply of online courses to help prepare their freshmen for college.

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Language and Technology
12:03 pm
Mon April 29, 2013

Lean Back And LOL: Texting Is Not Ruining Language

Flickr Photo/Maryland GovPics

Texting has become an incredibly common way of communicating in the 21st century. Back in 2011, the Pew Research Center reported that young adults between the ages of 18 and 24 sent around 110 text messages per day. The texting craze has also given rise to an entirely new vocabulary — texters of all ages abbreviate, punctuate and accentuate in ways that are totally unique to the cell phone age.

So one question arises: Is texting killing our language? Ross Reynolds LOLs with professor John McWhorter and discusses the possible impact of txting and the feared f8 of language.

Social Media
2:30 pm
Thu April 25, 2013

Overheard In The Green Room: Monica Guzman

Monica Guzman in the KUOW green room.
KUOW Photo/Amber Cortes

Monica Guzman is a columnist for The Seattle Times and Northwest tech news site GeekWire. I caught up with her in the KUOW green room before her interview with Ross Reynolds to talk about the latest tech goodies on her radar and in her smartphone, her new vlog, and what she does to get away from it all.

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Pew Report
12:10 pm
Thu April 25, 2013

Political Activity Skyrockets On Social Media

Tweeting for politics.
Flickr Photo/Maryland GovPics

Nearly 40 percent of Americans engaged in political activity on social networking sites like Facebook or Twitter in the 2012 campaign.  That’s a dramatic increase from 2008 when only 26 percent of the population even used a social networking site, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center.  KUOW’s Ross Reynolds takes a closer look at the new study with Pew researcher Aaron Smith.

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