Actors playing characters in the Halo video games prep for the release of "Halo 5: Guardians" at the Microsoft store at Seattle's University Village on Monday, Oct. 26, 2015. From left: Melissa Kirbyson, Gabe Schulz, Cassie Karst and Aliya Matthews.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Stand in the rain for nearly 22 hours just to buy a video game? Julian Yarbrough was all about that as he waited Monday evening at Seattle's University Village for the release of "Halo 5: Guardians."

Ross Reynolds speaks with New York Times reporter Nick Wingfield about after school video game leagues for kids. Wingfield recently took his daughter to a sneak peek at one league in Seattle. 

Bruce Pavitt and Adam Farish show off the 8Stem app, which they expect to launch to the public next year.
KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

When you play recorded music you can turn the volume up and down or adjust bass and treble – that’s about it.

Bruce Pavitt, co-founder of Sub Pop records, the record label that unleashed Nirvana on the world, thinks that’s pretty boring. So he’s teaming up with inventor Adam Farish to develop a new music format called 8Stem.

Pavitt and Farish told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds that it will upend recorded music by letting listeners engage more deeply with what they hear.

Illustration of human heart and circulation.
Wikipedia Photo

UW Medicine is moving ahead with clinical trials to repair damaged hearts, thanks to a $10 million grant from a local foundation.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S. When a person has a heart attack, one of the arteries gets blocked, often by a clot. Without oxygen, the heart muscle dies off pretty quickly.  

In this Sept. 10, 2014 file photo, detained immigrant children line up in the cafeteria at the Karnes County Residential Center in Texas. About 70 children from the border have been placed with foster families in Washington state.
AP Photo/Eric Gay

Expansion plans are underway for an immigration program linked to Microsoft, but it's something that has nothing to do with computers or technology.

It’s a non-profit called KIND, or Kids In Need of Defense, and it provides free attorneys to immigrant children who face deportation.

WikiLeaks has released a cache of documents that the website says come from the AOL email account of Central Intelligence Agency Director John Brennan.

The documents purportedly include Brennan's security clearance application with personal information as well as the names, addresses and telephone numbers of many of his acquaintances, including high-profile ones like former CIA Director George Tenet. In another document, Brennan appears to give advice on how to deal with Iran to the incoming Obama administration. is under fire after an article from the New York Times lambasted its workplace atmosphere.
Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC BY 2.0)/

Jeannie Yandel talks with Geekwire co-founder Todd Bishop about why Amazon responded to the New York Times' piece about its work culture two months after the fact, why the video messaging app Snapchat secretly opened a Seattle engineering office, and what the closure of the Urbanspoon office says about the Seattle tech landscape.  

Few images can put life's trivialities into perspective quite like the sight of our planet in the interminable blackness of space.

And at the very least, it's a cool view.

On Monday, NASA announced that this view will be available every day on a new website dedicated to publishing images from a satellite camera 1 million miles away from Earth.

Consumer drones look like child's play after you get a look at the unmanned, water-dropping helicopter that was pitched to the federal government Wednesday. The K-MAX chopper is the largest of several remotely-piloted firefighting aircraft to get a tryout this year.

Pluto is not dead. That's the bottom line, according to new research published in the journal Science. The dwarf planet is home to mountains, glaciers and a hazy atmosphere that stretches for a hundred miles above the surface.

Tens of thousands of cars that drive themselves are about to hit the streets. Sort of. Last year, the electric carmaker Tesla started putting cameras and sensors into its Model S vehicles — making it possible, one day, for the devices to become the driver's eyes, ears and even hands. And today is the day.

The way Tesla has chosen to deliver this feature to car owners is peculiar, but let's start with what self-driving even means.

Football's popularity has made it among the most lucrative business franchises. So it should come as no surprise that the NFL and other organizations holding the broadcasting rights to games felt very strongly about Deadspin and SB Nation, popular sports publications, attracting readers by posting highlights on Twitter.

What came next were complaints of copyright violations. Then came Twitter's suspension of the accounts. Now comes the question: Do GIFs of sports highlights qualify as fair use?

Michael Mattmiller in one of Seattle's secret data centers. He says data helps government work better, but he's trying to cut back a bit and disseminate a uniform data privacy policy across all city departments.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Somewhere in an office tower in downtown Seattle is a floor filled with data servers. Some of that data is about you. You might show up in a traffic camera video. Your personal information might show up in a utility bill.

Seattle collects a lot of such data. But data can be hacked and information can be misused. That’s why the city’s rethinking how and when it collects your personal data.
Flickr Photo/Soumit Nandi (CC BY NC ND)/

David Hyde speaks with Todd Bishop about why Amazon (is rumored to be) opening a brick and mortar store in Seattle, and how he got his hands on some blueprints. Also: the device that could save Microsoft.

Christina Lomasney, CEO of Modumetal
Courtesy of Modumetal

Imagine a highway guardrail crafted from a new kind of metal that doesn’t rust. Or a car that you design yourself one day, is delivered to your door the next and weighs a fraction of what current vehicles do.

The first exists, thanks to a Seattle startup called Modumetal. The latter … well, that might take a little longer, CEO Christina Lomasney told KUOW’s David Hyde.