technology

What's Trending On Instagram? A Battle With Twitter

Jun 23, 2015

Consider yourself warned: Instagram rolled out an update Tuesday, and the photo-sharing app may be about to eat up a lot more of your time.

More substantial than other recent makeovers touting new filters, this change will transform Instagram into a stream of real-time updates from around the country. Following in the footsteps of Twitter and Facebook, Instagram wants to be a source for your news.

Computer scientist and author Ramez Naam
Courtesy of Ramez Naam

Ross Reynolds interviews Seattle computer scientist and science fiction writer Ramez Naam about the latest technology in human enhancement.  Naam is the author of the 2010 book, “More Than Human: Embracing the Promise of Biological Enhancement."

broadband router internet
Flickr Photo/Tom Page (CC BY 2.0)

Ross Reynolds interviews Christopher Mitchell about what steps Seattle might take to provide affordable broadband internet for all. Mitchell is the director of the Community Broadband Networks Initiative for the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.

Michael Dalder/Reuters

Today, computer and information technology is advancing faster than at any time in human history. Tons of money is being invested into and earned from the industry. Technology giants like Google, Facebook and Apple are changing the world through technological innovations.

Chandra LeGue and David Calahan are facing a bit of a problem. They’re at the Sundown Trailhead near Southern Oregon's Applegate Valley. And they’re standing in the middle of a cloud.

Normally hiking in foggy weather isn’t a big deal. But on this day LeGue wanted it to be clear so the Google Trekker apparatus she’s carrying on her back can photograph the trail.

Cynthia Tee is the executive director of Ada Developers Academy, a coding school for women in Seattle.
Courtesy of Cynthia Tee

In a nondescript classroom in downtown Seattle, young women hunch over laptops, staring at lines of code.

These women, most of them in their 20s and 30s, are enrolled at Ada Developers Academy. This competitive program offers women free tuition and a stipend – all in the name of getting more women into the tech industry.

The annual Electronic Entertainment Expo is underway in Los Angeles this week. The gaming trade show is a showcase for new games, consoles and new developments from major franchises, such as Halo, Call of Duty and Grand Theft Auto. This year, virtual reality is a major focus. Re/code associate editor Eric Johnson talks to Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about what he’s seeing at this year’s E3.

Marcie Sillman speaks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about Seattle's broadband debacle. An independent consultant says it's just too expensive for Seattle to build a gigabit broadband system and operate it as a public utility, but advocates still want an alternative to Comcast and Century Link.

As cyberattacks continue, analysts are seeing a new pattern: Hackers are focused on stealing personally identifiable information. That includes the security clearances of U.S. intelligence officers, with the reported theft of background information. It also includes information that's less sensitive but far-reaching — like Social Security numbers.

Jesse Jackson visited Seattle on Wednesday, asking that the tech industry focus on hiring more people of color and women.
KUOW Photo/Jamala Henderson

Rev. Jesse Jackson called out Amazon during a visit to Seattle on Wednesday.

“The board of the directors is all white in 2015,” Jackson said at Northeastern University’s newest building on South Lake Union. “Our challenge is not just to point the blame, but to point out the solution. Which is inclusion.”

Ross Reynolds speaks with Joaquin Uy, a board member of the Filipino Community Center and communications director for the Low Income Housing Alliance, about how important fast internet is to immigrant and low-income communities.

Also, Reynolds talks with Michael Mattmiller, Seattle’s chief technology officer, about the release of a feasibility study for municipal run broadband internet that city officials say makes it too expensive to compete with private companies like Comcast and Century Link. 

Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with University of Washington philosophy professor Michael Blake about the ethics of proposals by companies in this region -- like Microsoft -- to hire more foreign workers.

In 2001, Tim Hunt won a share of a Nobel Prize. In 2006, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II. But in 2015, he's being widely criticized for his recent remarks about women in science, including: "when you criticize them, they cry."

Hunt, a biochemist, made that and other comments during a speech this week at the World Conference of Science Journalists that's being held in South Korea this week. He was quoted in a tweet that's since been shared hundreds of times, asking the audience to "let me tell you about my trouble with girls."

A few short years after voice mail was developed in the late 1970s, it quickly became an essential business tool.

But in the past few years, its use has been in decline. And some offices have opted to get rid of it altogether.

After JPMorgan Chase said last week it was canceling voice mail for most of its employees, I sent the bank's public relations department an email.

A bit later, there was that familiar red light on my desk phone:

On Friday, 24 robots and their masters will be going head-to-head in California for a $2 million prize. The robotics challenge is sponsored by the Pentagon's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

Those fearing the Pentagon-sponsored prize could signal the dawn of Terminator-style cyborgs needn't worry. "Even though they look like us, and they may look a little bit mean, there's really nothing inside," says Gill Pratt, the program manager running this competition. "What you're really seeing is a puppet."

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