technology

A study says that iPhone's Siri program -- which can be used without hands or eyes -- is a huge distraction for drivers.
Flickr Photo/Elizabeth Press (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The Washington Traffic Safety Commission is taking another run at an expanded distracted driving law. A proposed bill is sitting at the governor’s office now. The legislation would expand the current ban on texting or holding a handset to the ear to include touching a mobile device while driving.

Though the proposal addresses more of the ways people are interacting with their devices, it leaves out one major distraction:  Siri.

"Text neck," the posture formed by leaning over a cellphone while reading and texting, is a big problem, according to the author of a newly published study in the National Library of Medicine.

Kenneth K. Hansraj, chief of spine surgery at New York Spine Surgery & Rehabilitation Medicine, says the bad posture can put up to 60 pounds of pressure on the upper spine — sometimes for several hours a day, depending on how often people look at their devices.

Pujpha Bania, 33, and her daughter Manisha, 8, are migrant workers from Odisha state in northeast India. They travelled several days by train to work at a brick kiln near Hyderabad, India.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

HYDERABAD, INDIA – The road to Hyderabad winds through a landscape of ancient boulders – some three or four stories high. The earth-colored stones fill wide gaps between the sleek, high-rise towers that push the city’s skyline and suburbs to new limits.

Students sit in a computer science class taught by professor Chakravarthy Bhagavati at the University of Hyderabad.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

HYDERABAD, INDIA – If you ask engineering students in India about their career paths, the conversation often leads to America and if they’d like to go there.

“Obviously,” is a typical response.

Flickr Photo/Fabien Lavocat (CC BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with  Todd Bishop, co-founder of GeekWire, about Microsoft's fate in the sea of successful tech giants.

The Washington governor's office unveiled draft rules for government use of drones Monday. It would replace legislation that Democrat Jay Inslee vetoed earlier this year.

GeekGirlCon programming director Jennifer K. Stuller kicks-off a viewing of "Supergirl" at a 2013 event at Central Cinema.
Flickr Photo/GeekGirlCon (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Jennifer K. Stuller, local writer and a co-founder of Seattle's GeekGirlCon, about the Gamergate controversy and diversity in geek culture. 

On the same morning net neutrality demonstrators showed up at FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler's house to protest a plan that could let broadband providers charge for "fast lanes" to the Internet, the demonstrators found unexpected support from the White House.

Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Nick Wingfield, tech reporter for the New York Times, about Microsoft's decision to offer its Office software for free on smartphones and tablets.

Seattle streets, seen from the 40th floor of the Seattle Municipal Tower.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle's new parking meters, scheduled to replace 2,200 outdated meters, are kind of a big deal. Their guts and brains are state of the art, with speedy cellular service, bigger screens and a numeric keypad capable of ingesting complex kinds of information, such as license plate numbers.

What's in your home, always on, ready to listen to you and constantly adapting to the way you talk? Why, it's Amazon's Echo speaker. Think a less portable Siri or Google Now, but hands-free.

Are you ready to bring an eavesdropping device that's connected to the cloud into the privacy of your abode?

Army Eyes 3-D Printed Food For Soldiers

Nov 4, 2014

Army scientists have spent decades concocting meals that last without refrigeration and survive high-altitude airdrops. And now, the Army is eyeing a new form of cooking: 3-D printing! Yes, food that comes fresh out of a printer, for our troops.

Lauren Oleksyk, a food technologist leading the team at the Army's Natick research center, lays out the vision.

Imagine soldiers who are strapped, head to toe, with sensors that measure if they're high or low in potassium or cholesterol.

Flickr Photo/MaxVT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with GeekWire co-founder Todd Bishop about this week's tech news, including recent praise for Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and Apple moving work into the Seattle area.

In what could be a major setback for commercial space tourism, a manned spaceship has crashed in California's Mojave Desert.

The Virgin Galactic Spaceship Two was on a test flight this morning, with two pilots aboard. Minutes after its rocket fired, the company announced on Twitter that spacecraft experienced an "anomaly."

Capt. Tom Ellison of Kern County Fire Department said that Spaceship Two had a malfunction shortly after it separated from White Knight Two, the rocket that gives Spaceship Two a lift up to 45,000 feet.

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