Driving in rural, southern Hungary, especially at night, you're likely to see people emerging from dark forests along the side of the road. They trudge along the highway's narrow shoulder and sometimes flag down passing cars, asking for help.

They're migrants and refugees who've entered Hungary by the tens of thousands in recent months, mostly en route to Germany and other northern European countries.

But it's illegal for civilians in Hungary to help them get there.

A tall rectangular building juts out of a mountainside on a Norwegian island just 800 miles from the North Pole. Narrow and sharply edged, the facility cuts an intimidating figure against the barren Arctic background. But the gray building holds the key to the earth's biodiversity.

Liz Jones

Over Labor Day weekend, a grassroots community meeting in Seattle quickly came together. The topic: how to help and resettle Syrian refugees in Washington state. 

With thousands of Syrian refugees and other migrants finally reaching havens in Germany and other European countries — and thousands more arriving daily — the Obama administration says it's "actively considering" ways to help, including allowing more refugees into the U.S.

The migrant crisis has placed stress on infrastructure in Greece, Macedonia and Hungary. It has also highlighted divisions between European Union countries.

What exactly is going on in Syria?

Sep 7, 2015
Rodi Said/Reuters

The position of Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad is getting weaker, analysts say.

His regime has been battling a rebellion that began in the spring of 2011, as unrest spread across the Arab world.

Editor's Note: The photos in this story may be distressing to some viewers. The original version has been updated to include additional details.

The numbers associated with today's migration crisis are huge: 4 million Syrians fleeing their country; 3 million Iraqis displaced. But it was the image of a solitary child — a toddler in a red T-shirt, blue shorts and Velcro sneakers, found face-down on a Turkish beach — that shocked and haunted the world this week.

The 20-year-old activist who died trying to help rebuild a city

Jul 21, 2015
Hatice Ezgi Sadet's Instagram.

Before she was killed by a suicide bomber, before her Instagram photos were shared and liked by thousands, Hatice Ezgi Sadet was a 20-year-old art history student from Turkey looking forward to going on an archeological excavation trip and using her newly obtained driver’s license.

The U.N. estimates that more than 4 million Syrians have fled the country since the start of the civil war there four years ago, making it the worst refugee crisis in a quarter century.

The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees says the total number of refugees that have left Syria could be more than 4.25 million by the end of the year. An additional 7.6 million people are internally displaced.

Ross Reynolds talks with Rep. Rick Larsen, D-Wash., about his decision to vote for a measure to train and equip moderate Syrian opposition forces to fight against the militant Islamic State.

Flickr Photo/The White House (Pete Souza) (CC)

Marcie Sillman speaks with U.S. Representatives Jim McDermott and Denny Heck about their response to President Obama's strategy in Iraq and Syria against the terrorist group ISIS.

Number Of Refugees On The Rise

May 21, 2014
Flickr Photo/United Nations Photo

Ross Reynolds talks with Judith Kumin, former United Nation's official and current professor of International Human Rights at the University of New Hampshire, about why the number of displaced people in the world is on the rise.

Joel Migdal's book "Shifting Sands."

Steve Scher talks to University of Washington professor Joel Migdal about his new book "Shifting Sands: The United States and The Middle East."

On a sunny afternoon in the dusty, overcrowded Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, a group of Syrian girls recites a familiar pledge and hope to change their future. The youngsters promise to serve God and country, to help people at all times and live by the laws of the Girl Scouts.

The troop was organized by Hanna Vazquez, a volunteer with Mercy Corps, a U.S.-based humanitarian group.

"We are going to do the Girl Scout music badge," she says, as the girls gather around.

AP Photo/Khalil Hamra

Steve Scher talks with Edward Chaiban, UNICEF's director of Emergency Programmes, about how the conflict in Syria has affected the local children.

UNICEF recently released a report that stated at least 10,000 children were killed in the violence, and almost 3 million children in Syria and in neighboring countries are unable to go to school on a regular basis.

The complicated situation in Ukraine is headed toward an important moment, as a vote on an interim government has been scheduled for Thursday. But tensions are running high in the region, with Russia ordering military exercises along its border.