Standing Rock | KUOW News and Information

Standing Rock

A Dakota Access pipeline protester defies law enforcement officers who are trying to force them from a camp on private land in the path of pipeline construction, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016 near Cannon Ball, N.D.
AP Photo/James MacPherson

Jeannie Yandel sits down with Seattle Times reporter Lynda Mapes to talk about the latest in the standoff over the construction of a proposed oil pipeline in North Dakota. 

In North Dakota, tension over the 1,200-mile Dakota Access oil pipeline is escalating. Police and National Guard troops arrested more than 140 protesters near a construction site Thursday.

The Standing Rock Sioux have sued to stop the pipeline from crossing under the Missouri River next to their reservation, claiming the project would destroy sacred sites and threaten the water supply.

'Week in Review' panel Sherman Alexie, Phyllis Fletcher, Rob McKenna and Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

What do you do if you’re an anti-Trump Republican or anti-Hillary Democrat? Should you vote for a third party candidate?          

And this week the Brady Walkinshaw campaign released its first attack ad against opponent Pramila Jayapal in the 7th Congressional District race. After the ad was released Jayapal's campaign accused the ad of being racist and misogynistic. Was the ad “Trump-like?”

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times environment reporter Lynda Mapes Thursday morning about the Dakota Access Pipeline protests. Mapes is on the scene in North Dakota where the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and hundreds of supporters are continuing a months-long protest against the construction of a pipeline. 

Police moved in on Thursday to disperse protesters who have moved the front line of their demonstration onto private land. 

Amy Goodman — the host of the left-leaning Democracy Now news program will not face criminal charges for her coverage of an oil pipeline protest in North Dakota last month. At least not for now — prosecutors say they may still bring charges later.

On Sept. 3, Goodman and her crew captured images of security teams with dogs trying to keep protesters from entering a pipeline construction site. She wanted to know if security members were "telling the dogs to bite the protesters?"

The fight over transporting crude oil has spread across the northern U.S., with protesters disrupting pipelines that carry crude from Canada into the U.S. At least one protester has been injured and dozens have been arrested since Monday.

Northwest tribes continue to show support for the Standing Rock Sioux Indians and their opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline. Over the weekend, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville delivered hand-smoked salmon and firewood to North Dakota.

When she was growing up, Dina Gilio-Whitaker was constantly asked, "How much Indian blood do you have?" She could never figure out how to respond, which is not to say she didn't know who she was.

"I knew that I was Native, I knew that I was Colville, I knew my family up there on the reservation," she said recently. "But what I grew up with was a process of not being seen and not being recognized as being Native, because I was completely out of context.

KUOW photo/Bond Huberman

After last week’s announcement by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray to put the plans for the new North Precinct building on hold, protesters interrupted a City Council meeting. What new issues are they raising with the city?

Gabe Galanda is an attorney specializing in Native American law
KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Bill Radke sits down with Seattle-based lawyer Gabe Galanda to talk about the protests surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota. Galanda opposes the pipeline and joined the protests in North Dakota earlier this month.

He also helped draft a resolution in opposition to construction of the pipeline that was introduced at a Seattle City Council meeting Monday.

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Andrew Cullen/Reuters

For weeks, members of the Standing Rock Sioux have gathered in Cannonball, North Dakota standing against what's known as the Dakota Access pipeline.

The 1,172-mile pipeline is a $3.7 billion dollar project that would carry about 470,000 barrels of crude oil a day from North Dakota to Illinois.

Its route would take the pipeline under the Missouri River, just upstream from the Standing Rock reservation, and Sioux tribal members say this would threaten their drinking water and sacred sites.

In North Dakota, work has stopped on one section of the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline. Still, over the weekend protesters continued to stream into camps set up near the construction site.

One protest camp is about an hour's drive south of Bismarck. A prairie there is covered with tepees, tents and RVs. Flags from tribes around the country line the dirt road into the camp.

Members of eight Washington tribes took lessons they learned last spring with them to North Dakota last week, where the Standing Rock Sioux are opposing the construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline.

Construction of a controversial crude oil pipeline set to span at least 1,168 miles from North Dakota to Illinois has temporarily been halted in North Dakota amid protests by Native American tribes.

Members of the Standing Rock Sioux fear the pipeline could potentially contaminate their local drinking water and lands sacred to the tribe.

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