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Tonight marks the end of an era for the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team. The World Cup champions play their final Victory Tour match against China in New Orleans. It's also the final game for one of their longtime stars: Abby Wambach.

The 35-year-old forward is hanging up her cleats after a stellar career. Consider:

File photo of rowers.
Flickr Photo/Cocoa Dream (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1IYnZnA

It doesn't matter if you're an athlete or not, you have to kind of shut up and suck it up sometimes. That’s the tough love of Seattle Storm owner Ginny Gilder.

Tough love in sports has been part of the debate over the recent firing of University of Washington women’s rowing coach Bob Ernst.

'Week in Review' panel Melanie McFarland, Dan Savage, Rob McKenna and KUOW's Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Was the UW women’s crew coach inspiring his athletes, psychologically abusing them,  or something in between? Also, how do we honor American history when it wasn’t always honorable? And, we all react to shooting after shooting after shooting.

Bill Radke’s guests inclue Stranger editorial director Dan Savage, former Washington Attorney General Rob McKenna, and McTelevision’s Melanie McFarland; plus Seattle Times sportswriter Geoff Baker.

Bill Radke speaks with Geoff Baker, sports writer for the Seattle Times, about the University of Washington's decision to fire women's crew coach Bob Ernst.

We also hear from Dan Savage, editorial director of the Stranger, Melanie McFarland, journalist and TV critic, and Rob McKenna, former Washington state attorney general, about tough love from sports coaches and whether it helps or hurts athletes.

Seattle Seahawks photo

Running back Fred Jackson spent eight seasons with the Buffalo Bills before coming to the Seahawks at the beginning of this season. His wife and four children have stayed back East for the school year. He talked to KUOW about what Thanksgiving means to him and how he'll celebrate the holiday this year in a new city.

If you watch sports on TV, you can't miss the barrage of advertising for fantasy sports websites. Washington and Montana are two of only six states that keep out fantasy sports operators such as FanDuel and DraftKings.

The VICIS helmet is seen in a testing apparatus.
Courtesy of VICIS

Bill Radke talks with neurosurgeon Dr. Samuel Browd about his company's anti-concussion football helmet. Browd is a neurosurgeon at Seattle Children's Hospital and co-founder of the company Vicis.

Instructor Megan Shaeffer takes participants in the state’s first women-only hunting class on Nov. 7 in Black Diamond through a scenario over whether it’s ethical, legal and safe to shoot.
Courtesy of Megan Shaeffer

David Hyde speaks with volunteer instructor Megan Shaeffer about the need for women-only hunter education classes.  She recently lead the state's first on Nov. 7 in Black Diamond. 

Shabana Khan stands in front of a painting at Pro Sports, Bellevue, that depicts members of her family playing squash. (Shabana is the one in blue, while her brother Azam is in the center of the painting at her left).
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The world championships for squash are in Bellevue this week -- and it's all thanks to one family. 

Azam Khan, one of the organizers, learned the sport from his dad. His dad grew up working at British squash courts in Pakistan and India. He was one of many boys who fetched stray balls for British officers. But the boys had a secret.

Sportswear giant Adidas announced Thursday that it would offer free design resources and financial assistance to any high schools that want to change their logo or mascot from Native American imagery or symbolism.

The company announced the initiative ahead of the Tribal Nations Conference at the White House, which Adidas executives attended.

In the past few years, the Pentagon spent $6.8 million to pay for patriotic displays during the games of professional sports teams.

That's according to a joint oversight report released by Arizona Republican Sens. John Flake and John McCain on Wednesday.

The Kansas City Royals have earned their first World Series title in 30 years, staging a dramatic Game 5 comeback to beat the New York Mets 7-2.

They took home the series four games to one.

The final game featured a stunning extra-innings turnaround. It started as a pitchers' duel: the Mets' Matt Harvey against Kansas City's Edinson Volquez.

Ross Reynolds talks to Doug Merlino, author of "Beast: Blood, Struggle, and Dreams at the Heart of Mixed Martial Arts," about the legacy of mixed martial arts in the Pacific Northwest — and the superstar it created.

In a wide-ranging interview, suspended FIFA President Sepp Blatter says the troubles for soccer's world governing body started with his rival Michel Platini — who Blatter says also helped to undermine a push to deliver the 2022 World Cup to the U.S., instead of to Qatar.

"The FIFA World Cup or the FIFA president is a ball in the big political power game," Blatter tells Russia's TASS news agency.

The World Cup-winning U.S. women's national soccer team was honored at the White House today, where Obama praised the champions.

"This team taught all of America's children that 'playing like a girl' means you're a badass," he said.

Key Arena May Get Second Chance At The NBA

Oct 26, 2015
KeyArena in Seattle Center.
Flickr Photo/Doug Kerr (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1WeuApa

Ross Reynolds sits down with Seattle Times reporter Geoff Baker to discuss why several maritime groups, including the port and longshoremen union, want the city to reconsider Key Arena as a site for potential NBA or NHL teams.

Ross Reynolds speaks with New York Times reporter Nick Wingfield about after school video game leagues for kids. Wingfield recently took his daughter to a sneak peek at one league in Seattle. 

Students at Skyline High School in Sammamish play Gaelic football, which looks a lot like soccer -- until you catch the ball with your hands.
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

Irish President Michael Higgins is visiting Seattle this week. Thursday morning, he traveled to Skyline High School in Sammamish to watch a game of Gaelic football, a sport many locals probably have never seen.

It's sort of like soccer, except you can catch the ball. And then dribble it, or punt, or bump, or punch.

When it comes to feats of speed and strength, Homo sapiens is a pretty pitiful species. The list of animals that can outsprint us is embarrassing. There's the cheetah, of course, but also horses, ostriches, greyhounds, grizzly bears, kangaroos, wild boars, even some house cats.

Juanita High School football field in Kirkland, Washington.
Flickr Photo/Henry Alva (CC BY NC ND)/http://bit.ly/1PnqHtM

David Hyde talks to Geoff Baker, investigative reporter at the Seattle Times about the accusations of a culture of hazing at Juanita High School in Kirkland. 

Jeannie Yandel talks with Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation, about the role of professional sports in conversations about race, gender and social justice.

Football's popularity has made it among the most lucrative business franchises. So it should come as no surprise that the NFL and other organizations holding the broadcasting rights to games felt very strongly about Deadspin and SB Nation, popular sports publications, attracting readers by posting highlights on Twitter.

What came next were complaints of copyright violations. Then came Twitter's suspension of the accounts. Now comes the question: Do GIFs of sports highlights qualify as fair use?

It's a place where girls can play volleyball. They can do ballet (of course).

But soccer is a no-no.

That's the way it goes in Brazil, the country that famously loves soccer. There was once a legal ban — from 1941 to 1979 — noting that "women will not be allowed to practice sports which are considered incompatible to their feminine nature."

That law is no longer on the books. So things have changed. Brazil has a women's national team (although there's only room for a few elite players). The Brazilian player Marta is an international superstar.

Football
Flickr Photo/Eierschneider (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Ok5MYl

If America's gun debate is stuck, what would un-stick it? Is it time to ban youth football? Was Renoir that bad at painting? And who else is overrated?

Bill Radke discusses the week’s news with writer Sherman Alexie, Washington state Sen. Pramila Jayapal and Paul Guppy of the Washington Policy Center.

Lloyd McClendon, right, was fired from the Seattle Mariners after two seasons.
Flickr Photo/Dinur (CC BY NC ND 2.0) /http://bit.ly/1VJNyhS

Ross Reynolds speaks to Art Thiel, co-founder of Sports Press Northwest, about why the Seattle Mariners new general manager Jerry Dipoto is getting rid of manager Lloyd McClendon after just two seasons.  

Updated 6:02 p.m. ET

On Thursday morning, the ethics committee of soccer's world governing body banned the group's president and other leaders for 90 days, citing ongoing investigations into allegations against FIFA President Sepp Blatter, UEFA President and FIFA Vice President Michel Platini and FIFA Secretary-General Jérôme Valcke.

The suspensions go into effect immediately and could be extended by 45 days, FIFA says.

Football
Flickr Photo/Eierschneider (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Ok5MYl

Jeannie Yandel talks to Dr. Stanley Herring, co-director of UW Medicine's Sports Health and Safety Institute, about the safety of high school football players and other teen athletes. Herring is also medical director of Spine, Sports and Orthopedic Health at UW Medicine and a team doctor for the Seattle Seahawks and the Seattle Mariners. 

Herring said he would allow a child to play football, or another sport, only under these terms: The program has well-trained coaches; there is an emergency medical action plan in place; coaches, parents and athletes were educated about the risk of all injuries – not just concussions; and there was a plan for practices and games that limited unnecessary exposure to injury.

This September alone, three high school football players died after injuries sustained on the field. The latest, a 17-year-old quarterback from New Jersey, suffered a ruptured spleen during a game just over a week ago.

In some high schools across the U.S., deaths such as these — and an increased focus on the risk of head injury and concussions — have raised concerns among parents and diminished interest in the sport. At others, like the Maplewood Richmond Heights High School in suburban St. Louis, the football programs have disbanded altogether.

Community members gather for a candlelight vigil for those killed in a shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Ore., Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015.
AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli

We'll bring you the latest on investigations into the Roseburg, Oregon, shooting and last week's fatal Aurora Bridge crash. Plus: Shell’s Arctic oil abandonment as seen from the Aleutian Islands. Where did all the I-405 drivers go? And now that the Seattle Mariners have named Jerry Dipoto as their new general manager, will they finally put the right pretty Lego castle pieces in place and leave them there?

Bill Radke figures out the week’s news with former Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn, journalist Erica C. Barnett, former state lawmaker Bill Finkbeiner, KUOW’s John Ryan reporting from Alaska, Seattle Times reporters Lewis Kamb and Geoff Baker, Northwest News Networks’s Chris Lehman and WSDOT tolling director Craig Stone.

Kim Little (left) of Seattle Reign FC plays at Memorial Stadium in Seattle during an 2015 NWSL match/
Courtesy of Seattle Reign FC

This morning, NPR listeners heard Frank Deford’s take on why women’s sports get so little attention:

There aren’t that many women’s team sports. You look at the Women’s World Cup in soccer, it got tremendous coverage. Good grief, it really led coverage for a week or so. But once it was over, there was no carry over -- there was no women’s soccer league to go on and to pick up that attention.

Northwest soccer fans took to social media to point out that, um, what about Seattle Reign FC? A team that, by the way, will play Kansas City FC in the National Women’s Soccer League championship on Thursday. 

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