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In the misty rain, surrounded by Rio de Janeiro's green hills, police officer Eduardo Dias was buried last week. He was shot, purportedly by gang members, as he was leaving his post inside the favela, or shantytown, where he worked as a community cop.

The killing took place a few hundred feet from the Maracana Stadium, where the opening ceremony of the Summer Olympics will be held on Aug. 5. As family members wept by the graveside, the pastor raised his hands.

Bill Radke talks with former Seattle Supersonic Spencer Haywood about his legal battle with the National Basketball Association and how his Supreme Court case paved the way for a generation of NBA stars.

After retests of samples from the 2008 Beijing Olympics, 31 athletes from 12 countries in six sports could be banned from this summer's Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, the International Olympic Committee said Tuesday.

In a statement, the IOC said it retested 454 samples from the 2008 Beijing Games, using "the very latest scientific analysis methods." The retesting yielded suspicious results from dozens of athletes.

"All those athletes infringing anti-doping rules will be banned from competing at the Olympic Games Rio 2016," the statement from the IOC said.

One of just a handful of American distance runners picked as likely to medal this summer at the Olympic Games is transplanted Northwesterner Evan Jager. His success in the steeplechase could draw new converts to this entertaining but slightly obscure track and field event.

In fact, Beaverton, Oregon, has already quietly become a hub of world-class steeplechasers.

Amir Attaran, a professor in the School of Public Health and the School of Law at the University of Ottawa, isn't afraid to take a bold stand.

He has written a commentary for the Harvard Public Health Review, published this week, with the headline, "Why Public Health Concerns for Global Spread of Zika Virus Means that Rio de Janeiro's 2016 Olympic Games Must Not Proceed."

'Week in Review' panel Zaki Hamid, Bill Radke, Pamela Banks and Bill Finkbeiner.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

A dramatic “no” vote on a Seattle basketball arena leads to a misogynistic backlash, how do we get anything done in this city? And can we have Husky cheerleaders without being all kinds of exclusive? What are Trump and Clinton nostalgic about – and how about you?

Top read: Yes, I live in the Jungle. And so do 400 other people

Bill Radke gets wistful about the week gone by with the Urban League’s Pamela Banks, Humanities Washington’s Zaki Hamid and former Washington Republican state Senate Majority Leader Bill Finkbeiner. 

The UW Men's Rowing team practices along the Montlake Cut.
KUOW Photo/Matt Mills McKnight

Hundreds of boaters will converge at Seattle’s Montlake Cut Saturday for opening day of the boating season.

The Windermere Cup rowing regatta is a chance to see the national champion University of Washington crew in action.

A frenzy of last minute bidding on eBay Thursday produced a nice payday for two-time Olympian Nick Symmonds of Seattle.

Olympic Runner Puts Body Up For Auction

May 3, 2016

A two-time Olympian from the Pacific Northwest is renting out part of his body on eBay to make a point about the earning prospects for elite American runners. This week's auction is the latest gambit by outspoken middle-distance runner Nick Symmonds to take on his sport's governing boards.

Jeannie Yandel talks with Seattle Times reporter Geoff Baker about what happens to plans for a new sports arena in Sodo after the Seattle City Council said no to selling the developer a key public right-of-way.

The University of Washington men's rowing team prepares to launch their shells during an early morning practice.
KUOW Photo/Matt Mills McKnight

The old wooden rowing shell that hangs in the University of Washington crew team’s dining hall doesn’t look all that remarkable. You see boats like it in many nautical-themed restaurants.

But this particular wooden boat — the Husky Clipper — is special.

It carried nine UW athletes to an Olympic gold medal at the 1936 games in Berlin.

Bill Tytus took over Pocock Racing Shells in 1985 from Stan Pocock, the son of founder George Pocock.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

It takes about six minutes for the University of Washington’s top men’s rowing team to power the latest model Pocock racing shell on their home course through the Montlake Cut. 

But it took the factory in Everett, Washington, 260 work hours to get the boat to that point.

The University of Washington Men's Rowing team prepares for an early morning practice.
KUOW Photo/Matt Mills McKnight

The early morning water is usually calm in Seattle. That makes it the preferred time for rowers.

It’s beautiful as the sun rises over the water as the University of Washington’s rowing team heads out for practice.

But the peace doesn’t last.

Sodo stadiums century link safeco
Flickr Photo/SDOT Photos (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/bZhk8f

Few expected this Seattle City Council decision.

The council voted against giving up a street in Sodo to make way for a proposed arena. An investor group hoping to bring the NBA to Seattle needed that street to build its arena.

Washington State University cheer squad advice graphic
Facebook Photo/Washington State University Cheer

The University of Washington cheerleading team took some flak for an image they posted on Facebook showing the dos and don’ts for the right tryout look: athletic physique, false lashes, but not too much makeup.

The graphic was intended to give advice to aspiring cheerleaders, but others called the image offensive, exclusionary and ignorant.

A vote in Seattle City Council Monday afternoon could affect basketball fans, the Port of Seattle and traffic in SODO. Council members will decide whether to give up part of Occidental Avenue to allow for a new arena on the site.

UPDATE: The City Council rejected the proposal in a vote, 5 to 4.

Bellevue High School fans cheer during the first half of the team's Class 3A high school football championship game against Eastside Catholic, Friday, Dec. 4, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

When you think high school, do you think math class? Or do you think about the Friday night lights, the pep rallies and the spirit days?

Let's face it, high school sports are big in this country. By placing such a big emphasis on sports, some schools are sending kids the wrong message, said Amanda Ripley, an education journalist and author.

Note: This video contains offensive and abusive language.

[Youtube]

Two Chicago-area sports journalists were tired of being the target of abusive online comments from men, so they gathered up the degrading tweets that had been directed at them and asked other men to read them to their faces. The result is a video that has been viewed more than a million times.

Bellevue running back Isaiah Gilchrist, left, leaps to avoid a tackle attempt by Eastside Catholic's Noah Failauga during the first half of the Class 3A high school football championship Friday, Dec. 4, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Bill Radke talks with investigator and former federal prosecutor Carl Blackstone and Bellevue Wolverines Booster Club president John Connors about the recent investigation into Bellevue High School's football program.

A federal appeals court has reinstated Tom Brady's four-game suspension over his involvement in the "Deflategate" scandal.

In a 2-1 decision, a three-judge panel of the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a lower court ruling that found NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell was not fair when he handed down the suspension.

Early morning light filters into the cavernous gymnasium as Neetu lunges, climbs and contorts her body into impossible positions. She shimmies up a thick rope that dangles from the two-story ceiling, her heavily muscled arms propelling her upward. She races through calisthenics with 25 other young women in the boot camp atmosphere of Chhotu Ram Stadium and Wrestling Center, in the Indian state of Haryana, known for its wrestling tradition.

The grueling twice-a-day practice– 4 hours in the morning and 3 1/2 in the afternoon-- is her ordinary routine.

'Week in Review' panel Erica C. Barnett, Bill Radke, Gyasi Ross and Matt Manweller.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Should Seattle create designated drinking zones? Also, Bellevue High School football wins – but who loses if the recruitment is called into question? Should Harriet Tubman and Andrew Jackson have to share a home on a bill?

Bill Radke talks currency and current events with state Rep. Matt Manweller, writer Erica C. Barnett and attorney Gyasi Ross.

Anyone who has run more than a few miles with some regularity has experienced what is usually called a "runner's high," an overwhelming feeling of euphoria and well-being that makes the running experience something far more rewarding than just moving forward toward an end point.

As a dedicated endurance trail runner, I can attest to this feeling and the craving for more. Although this is not the only reason why people run, we come back, again and again, hoping for these almost magical moments, that come and go as we move along the road or the trail.

Bellevue running back Isaiah Gilchrist, left, leaps to avoid a tackle attempt by Eastside Catholic's Noah Failauga during the first half of the Class 3A high school football championship Friday, Dec. 4, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Supporters of the Bellevue High School football team are hitting back after an independent investigation found facts about the program breaking recruiting rules. 

news release issued last week indicated that the investigators have found the football program's boosters club paid for football players to attend an alternative private school and that false addresses were used to make out-of-district players eligible for the team. 

File photo of the Sodo area of Seattle.
Flickr Photo/camknows (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/cyojwG

A Seattle City Council committee has passed a key measure regarding the plans for a new sports arena.

It would close two blocks of Occidental Avenue South to make room for the arena.

Brazil is battling a recession, political chaos, high crime and the spreading Zika virus. All these factors seem to be conspiring to drive potential ticket buyers away in advance of the Summer Olympic Games set to open Aug. 5 in Rio de Janeiro.

Blisters are the bane of weekend hikers and Olympic marathoners alike. Stanford researchers say they've found a simple, cheap method to help prevent them.

That humble hero is paper surgical tape, which often costs less than a dollar and is sold at most any pharmacy.

Their study, published Monday in the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, found that the paper tape reduced the instance of blisters by 40 percent.

Manny Pacquiao defeated rival boxer Timothy Bradley Jr. in Las Vegas on Saturday night, in what the star has called the final fight of his career.

Pacquiao, who is Filipino, won the welterweight fight by unanimous decision from the judges. The fight at the MGM Grand was Pacquiao's first since his loss to Floyd Mayweather last May in what had been dubbed the "fight of the century."

'Week in Review" panel Paul Guppy, Bill Radke, Maud Daudon and Sydney Brownstone.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Advertising is coming to an outdoors near you, can commercialism save our state parks? Also, should Seattle give heroin users a safe place to inject? And, should we give over a Sodo street for a basketball arena?

Bill Radke runs the the fast break with The Stranger’s Sydney Brownstone, Washington Policy Center’s Paul Guppy and Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce CEO Maud Daudon.

File photo of the Sodo area of Seattle.
Flickr Photo/camknows (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/cyojwG

Bill Radke leads a discussion of whether or not the Seattle City Council should approve the development of a sports arena in the Sodo neighborhood. Radke speaks with Brian Robinson, site manager at sonicsrising.com, who supports the development, and land use attorney Cleveland Stockmeyer, who opposes the development.  

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