sports

Flickr Photo/Wrote (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to John Miller, assistant executive director at the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association, about how research into risks associated with school sports is changing attitudes and activities in Washington state and beyond.

Flickr Photo/whitneyinchicago

Marcie Sillman talks to clinical nutritionist Mary Purdy about the nourishment needed for training.

Purdy explains why you need nourishment after long workouts. You need to replenish your glycogen stores (the principle storage form of glucose, which your body uses for energy) with carbohydrates. Protein is also important, to help rebuild and repair your muscle.

The game announcers called it "the play of the game." We'd be foolish not to agree.

During last night's Blue Jays-Rangers game, a boy catches a foul ball. Without a thought, he turns around and gives the ball to a much older girl, who flashes a major smile.

You're thinking, wow, what a smooth operator. But the replay reveals the kid is slicker than you imagined. Just watch:

h/t: Deadspin.

AP Photo/Michael Conroy

Ross Reynolds talks with Dave Zirin, sports editor at The Nation, about Michael Sam — the first openly gay football player to be drafted by a National Football League team.

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Steve Scher talks with Seabury Blair Jr., a local author of hiking books, about where to go in the Cascades and on the Olympic Penninsula when you get an itching to head for the hills.

Blair is author of Day Hike! Olympic Peninsula, part of the Day Hikes! series of books from Sasquatch Press.

While sports fan in the U.S. have been focused this week on the Donald Sterling scandal, European soccer fans have been talking about another racial incident. At a match between FC Barcelona (popularly known as Barça) and Villareal CF in Spain this past weekend, Brazilian player Dani Alves was setting up to take a corner kick when a banana, thrown by a fan, landed in front of him on the pitch. (You know, because racist taunts are never subtle.)

A family-owned sporting goods company in suburban Seattle is confronting the tension between honoring tradition and embracing innovation in the sport of baseball.

Flickr Photo/David Jones (CC BY-NC-ND)

On Tuesday, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver ordered that Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling be banned from the team and the NBA for life. The announcement came after Sterling's racist remarks were made public in a secretly taped recording.

Update: The NAACP issued a press release on Thursday advising that Leon Jenkins has resigned his post as president of the Los Angeles chapter. The national organization said it is "developing guidelines for its branches to help them in their award selection process."

"The Los Angeles NAACP intention to honor Mr. Sterling for a lifetime body of work must be withdrawn, and the donation that he's given to the Los Angeles NAACP will be returned."

Saying the Seattle Seahawks kept San Francisco 49ers fans from being able to pull for their team in January's NFC title game, a 49ers fan is suing the NFL, claiming the practice of limiting ticket sales to pro-Seahawks markets amounts to "economic discrimination." He is seeking $50 million in damages.

As hosts of the playoff game, the Seahawks limited credit-card sales of tickets to accounts with billing addresses in a list of nearby states. California wasn't on that list, which included parts of Canada and Hawaii. As a resident of Nevada, John E. Williams III was shut out.

Monitors flash Kaji Sherpa's vital signs as he recovers in the ICU of Katmandu's Norvic International hospital. Miraculously, the 39-year-old senior climber survived the wall of deadly ice and snow that crushed 16 of his colleagues in the largest loss of life in a single day on Everest, the mountain Sherpas call "Mother Goddess of Earth."

The team had been preparing a path for their clients, fixing ropes on a treacherous stretch known as the "Popcorn" ice field, so-called for its bulging chunks of ice.

"There was a small hill" that acted as a buffer, Kaji says.

In the men's field of the 118th Boston Marathon, American Meb Keflezighi ended a 31-year drought for U.S. runners, after holding off Wilson Chebet of Kenya in a race that came down to the final mile.

According to race officials, Keflezighi, 38, ran a 4:56 split at mile 23, when he built a 20-second lead. That lead dwindled as the runners neared the finish line, but Keflezighi held off all challengers to win the race with an unofficial finishing time of 2:08:37.

We don't need to go on at length about why today's running of the Boston Marathon is important.

Eight runners entered in the 2014 Boston Marathon are documenting their race preparations for NPR in a Tumblr blog. Demi Clark is one of the eight, and this is her story.

Thanks to late-season snow that fell at many area Cascade ski areas will welcome skiers and snowboarders well past Easter.

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