sports

A pair of experienced long distance hikers are more than halfway through a full traverse of the Pacific Crest Trail - in the dead of winter.

Flickr Photo/U.S. Fish & Wildlife (CC-BY-NC-ND)

There is no such thing as a seahawk, but you super fans probably knew that already.

“Seahawk is one of those colloquial terms much like a sparrowhawk or buzzard or seagull,” said ornithologist John Klicka of the University of Washington's Burke Museum. “From a sort of a scientific perspective there's no such thing.”

Seattle running back Marshawn Lynch makes a run against the Baltimore Ravens at CenturyLink Field in 2011.
Flickr Photo/JBLM PAO (CC0-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks to John Vidale who explains how local seismologists are harnessing the power of Seahawks fans to test new earthquake sensor technology. Vidale is a professor of earth and space science at University of Washington and the director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, which allows you to track the shaking of CenturyLink Field during the Seahawks game.

Seattle Seahawk fans at Century Link Field.
Flickr Photo/Joe Parks (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Yes, you're loud. But it's not drowning out the opposing team or pumping up Marshawn Lynch that's giving the Seahawks an edge at home. Bill Radke talks with Sports Illustrated's Jon Wertheim about what home-field advantage really boils down to.

Nathan Boss, 16, poses with his Airsoft gun before playing the game for the first time. Airsoft guns are sold with orange tips to make them look less realistic, but most players remove them.
Courtesy of Nathan Boss

RadioActive's Nathan Boss, 16, made his first foray into American gun culture through a real-life combat simulation game called airsoft, where players use guns that shoot non-lethal plastic pellets. This experience inspired him to examine whether playing with fake guns fosters real violence. 

The "field" is located down a high wire path, behind a Les Schwab in Maple Valley. After a couple hundred yards, I turn off of the path into a dense forest. I come to a clearing.

People are setting up, laying down gun bags and test firing guns. Most are military-looking types: short hair, good gear, well disciplined. Others have their faces adorned with bits of metal and their ears pierced. The smell of tobacco vapor fills the air.

Marcie Sillman talks with Jackson Brown, manager of the University of Washington's e-sports team, the Purple Castor Mignons, about the team's big win in 2014 and how e-sports is making a splash on the Seattle campus.

The 'Week In Review' panel would like to thank everyone who wears a beard cover when working with food.
Flickr Photo/Suzie's Farm (CC-BY-NC-ND)

It's not every week we get the chance to say "beard diaper" on the radio (it has to do with a story about ice cream and facial hair). Also making news this week: new laws and a new lawsuit. And what were the most important and most over-covered stories of 2014? Plus, the Seattle Seahawks and Macklemore: still a big deal in 2015?

A municipal court judge in Kirkland, Washington, is mulling whether to dismiss domestic violence charges against U.S. soccer star Hope Solo.

Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice sits on the sideline during a preseason game in 2007. Rice was the focus of a domestic violence controversy in 2014.
AP Photo/Nick Wass, File

Marcie Sillman talks with journalist Sam Eifling about the NFL's troubles in 2014 and why we can't stop watching.

The choice of Qatar as host for the Soccer World Cup in 2022 continues to cause controversy.

Bribery and corruption allegations about the original bid refuse to go away and human rights activists have criticized Qatar’s treatment of the vast migrant workforce employed in construction projects.

But what is the responsibility of the international companies who were awarded massive contracts in Qatar?

It was open season on the pineapple in ski country last week. Crystal Mountain posted a video bemoaning a recent run of warm, wet weather known as the pineapple express.
Screenshot from Vimeo

This year’s ski season is getting off to a slow start thanks to an old skiers’ nemesis: the pineapple express.

Unusually warm and wet weather has been washing away the snow on the region’s ski hills. Fresh snow finally started falling over the weekend.

But not before some innocent pineapples had to die.

The U.S. Women's National Soccer team finished its 2014 season with a second-place finish Sunday in the rainy final of the International Tournament of Brasilia. Brazil and the U.S. played to a 0-0 draw.

The University of New Hampshire Wildcats are heading into a do-or-die quarterfinal football game this week against the University of Tennessee, Chattanooga.

And whether they win or not, there's one thing you can say about the Wildcats: They are likely the only football team in America trying to reduce concussions by practicing without helmets.

Football has a concussion problem, from the National Football League down to Pee-Wee teams. And there are lots of efforts out there to fix it.

On Sunday, five St. Louis Rams players jogged onto the field with their arms raised by their heads, a stream of fog behind them: hands up, don't shoot.

The players — Tavon Austin, Kenny Britt, Jared Cook, Chris Givens and Stedman Bailey — were invoking the gesture that's been widely used in protesting the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown by police officer Darren Wilson. This followed the announcement that a grand jury would not indict Wilson in Brown's death, and the release of a hefty batch of evidence shown to the jury by St. Louis prosecutor Robert McCullough.

Soccer's governing body said today it will further review the bidding process for the 2018 and 2022 World Cups, reopening for scrutiny the mechanism by which Russia and Qatar were awarded the tournaments.

Pages