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Fans at a Seattle Seahawks match.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

It's been almost two years since the Seattle Seahawks lost the Super Bowl to the New England Patriots. This Sunday, the two teams meet for the first time since then in a game that's being called a Super Bowl rematch. 

Sports writer Dave Zirin said for some fans in Seattle, which voted overwhelmingly against Donald Trump, it will also be political grudge match.  


Lloyd McClendon, right, was fired from the Seattle Mariners after two seasons.
Flickr Photo/Dinur (CC BY NC ND 2.0) /http://bit.ly/1VJNyhS

Bill Radke speaks with writer and radio host John Moe about the next team to take up the mantle of loveable losers in Major League Baseball. The Chicago Cubs gave up the title Wednesday night after winning the World Series. They ended a 108 year drought when they defeated the Cleveland Indians in Game 7.   


The neighborhood that surrounds Wrigley Field on the north side of Chicago is known, fittingly, as Wrigleyville. Wednesday night thousands of Chicago Cubs fans flooded its streets.

The Associated Press reports:

As the game ended, the roar from inside the bars and the throng of fans on the streets was deafening, before the crowds both inside and out sang "Go, Cubs, Go" at the top of their lungs.

As the celebration progressed, thousands of fans poured into the streets leading away from Wrigley, many of them singing "We Are The Champions."

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle Times reporter Geoff Baker about a new proposal from Chris Hansen to build a sports arena in Seattle's Sodo area. Hansen now says he doesn't need the public to chip in $200 million in public financing.

The New York Giants have released kicker Josh Brown over his admitted abuse of his then-wife, in a case that has previously raised questions about the NFL's willingness to punish players who commit acts of domestic violence.

"We believed we did the right thing at every juncture in our relationship with Josh," team President John Mara said in a statement. "Our beliefs, our judgments and our decisions were misguided. We accept that responsibility."

For many of us, simply running a marathon is a serious challenge.

But Michal Kapral, a 44-year-old editor from Toronto, had a more difficult goal in mind. He wanted to run a marathon ... while juggling ... without dropping a ball even once.

And he did it at the Chicago Marathon on Sunday, at the brisk clip of 2 hours and 55 minutes. That's a pace of about 6:40 per mile.

Football
Flickr Photo/Eierschneider (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Ok5MYl

Bill Radke talks with Dan Ericson, a football coach for Klahowya Secondary School in Silverdale, Washington. In light of four schools forfeiting against the "dangerously large" football team from Everett's Archbishop Murphy High School, Ericson explains that the rules are to blame. He sees a system that penalizes public schools, and harms teens who play all sports. 

Only one woman has been allowed to represent Iran in triathlons. Her name is Shirin Gerami, and this weekend the athlete faces her biggest test yet.

First, she'll swim 2.4 miles in choppy water. Then, she'll bike 112 miles. She'll top off the race with a full marathon, on a road that crosses a landscape described as "barren lava fields."

Daniel Brewer arrived in London on Sunday morning wearing a Jacksonville Jaguars onesie and face paint, complete with black whiskers, brown spots and a blue nose. He had come with fellow fans from the English city of Reading to cheer on the Jags as they took on the Indianapolis Colts beneath sunny skies at Wembley Stadium.

"None of us naturally are Jags fans," Brewer confided. "We all have our own roots, but because they signed a contract, they've got our hearts."

The Supreme Court has decided to hear a case that might decide whether the government can deny Washington's NFL team a trademark because it has deemed the team name is offensive.

The court granted certiorari on Lee V. Tam. If you remember, The Slants, an Asian-American rock band, sued the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office because it refused to trademark their name saying it proved offensive.

Courtesy of Seattle University/Yosef Chaim Kalinko

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is known for his record-setting feats in the NBA and as a best-selling author and cultural critic. His new book is “Writings on the Wall: Searching for a New Equality beyond Black and White.”

He spoke with journalist Art Thiel on September 8 at Seattle University. Jennie Cecil Moore recorded their talk.

Week 2 of the NFL season is now complete, and what once would have been unimaginable is now becoming commonplace.

I'm talking about protests — player protests — visible, controversial, much-talked-about displays during the playing of the national anthem, before NFL games, in stadiums, around the country.

These protests began nearly a month ago when San Francisco 49ers backup quarterback Colin Kaepernick chose to sit rather than stand while The Star-Spangled Banner was being played during a preseason game.

Saying it wants to make football safer for current and future athletes, the NFL is pledging to spend $100 million for "independent medical research and engineering advancements." A main goal will be to prevent and treat head injuries.

Announcing the pledge Wednesday, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said it is in addition to the $100 million the league already committed toward medical research of brain injuries and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the progressive degenerative disease that has been found in football players.

Over the course of her career, soccer star Abby Wambach scored 184 goals — more than any other man or woman in the history of international soccer. She won two Olympic gold medals and was named the 2012 FIFA World Player of the Year before retiring from the sport in 2015. And yet, she says she never wanted to be known "just as a soccer player."

Republican politicians in North Carolina are lashing out at the NCAA after the sanctioning body announced it was relocating seven championship sporting events because of a state law limiting civil rights protections for LGBT people.

The law, known as HB2, has drawn wide condemnation and had already cost the state the 2017 NBA All-Star game.

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