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Sound Transit

The Big Horn Wind Farm in Klickitat County, Washington.
Flickr Photo/Alex Williams (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8c39me

Puget Sound Energy is launching a program that will bring a new wind farm to the state. PSE’s new Green Direct program is set up as an alternative way for major utility customers to buy their energy.

Sound Transit's light rail shot from the SeaTac Airport Station.
Flickr Photo/Michael @NW Lens (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9P9hnJ

Bill Radke speaks with Sound Transit CEO Peter Rogoff about the future of mass transit in Seattle. Rogoff also answers questions from callers and social media. 

Sound Transit bus.
Flickr Photo/wings777 (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/63X142

Sound Transit has agreed to work with the state legislature on concerns over car tab fees.

Voters approved an increased car tab tax when they voted for the Sound Transit 3 package in November. However, as car-tab bills began arriving, the increases shocked some voters. And there's growing outrage over the way the tax is calculated.

Some drivers in the Puget Sound region are experiencing sticker shock over their car tab renewals. That’s because of the formula Sound Transit uses to assess vehicle values as it implements a new tax for light rail expansion.

traffic commute transportation car
Flickr Photo/JBLM (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Light rail planners aren't wasting any time after voters approved the transportation package known as Sound Transit 3.

The full project list will take up to 25 years to complete. Residents in Ballard and Everett will get light rail service in about 20 years. It's a shorter timeline to West Seattle and Tacoma — about 15 years.

Bill Radke speaks with Port of Seattle spokesman Brian DeRoy about planned improvements to the walkway between Sound Transit's Airport Station and Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. Among the improvements to the approximately quarter-mile walk: wind screens, heat lamps and golf carts.

King County Executive Dow Constantine and others tried to spin Sound Transit's win into a reason to stay optimistic as presidential politics and Pacific Northwest values seemed to go in opposite directions.
KUOW Photo/Ann Kane

In Washington state, the presidential election didn’t go the way most voters wanted. But one thing drew faint, complicated cheers in the greater Seattle Area: Sound Transit 3 passed.


Detta Hayes, 9 year driver for Microsoft's connector bus and vanpool service. Hayes is prone to frequent bursts of laughter, such as when I asked her if her bus ever gets stuck in traffic.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Chuck Collins is the guy who ran Metro in the 1970s.

He should be the kind of guy who salivates over light rail. But instead, he’s dreaming of more vanpools.

'Week in Review' panel Sydney Brownstone, C.R. Douglas, Brier Dudley and Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Did Governor Jay Inslee and Bill Bryant change any minds during this week's gubernatorial debate? What are the arguments for and against spending $54 billion on Sound Transit 3? And this week, Seattle teachers, students and parents wore Black Lives Matter shirts to class - what did we learn? Finally, should presidential candidates be doing stand-up comedy?

Sound Transit's Capitol Hill Station, prior to opening, 25 January 2016.
Flickr Photo/Don Wilson (CC BY-SA 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/Efv737

Money keeps pouring into the battle over the Sound Transit 3 ballot measure, with Mass Transit Now, the campaign working to pass the $54 billion transit package, up to nearly $3 million in contributions.

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Sound Transit's newest light rail station opened Saturday at Angle Lake, just south of Sea-Tac International Airport, to live music, dance troupes and protests.

Celestino Rocha, a.k.a. The Fish Killer, has tattoos that say Fear No Fish. He takes fishing in lakes like Angle Lake very seriously and will teach you if you ask.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

A new light rail station opens at Seatac’s Angle Lake this weekend. 

A lot of train riders are asking: What’s Angle Lake?

It’s a lake in Seatac that’s shaped like an angle. There’s a park there, and if you want, you can walk there in your swim suit from the train. The park has a checkered past and likely a brilliant future.


Kitsap Transit

A Seattle-area transit initiative takes in money from real-estate interests who could profit if the initiative passes. Commuters would face higher taxes, but many could also get to work faster.

No, we’re not talking about the $54 billion proposal to expand Sound Transit service (that campaign has been largely funded by $1.1 million from the construction industry, with the real-estate sector coming in second.) 

Screenshot of Mass Transit Now ad on Facebook

Construction firms and other big businesses have pumped more than $2 million into the campaign to pass a Sound Transit ballot measure this fall.

While Microsoft is the biggest single donor, at $300,000, the construction industry has the most invested in the transit measure passing: $1.1 million and counting.

Sound Transit's light rail shot from the SeaTac Airport Station.
Flickr Photo/Michael @NW Lens (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9P9hnJ

In one month, Sea-Tac airport will no longer be the last stop on the Sound Transit light rail line. Sound Transit plans to open the Angle Lake train station on September 24, several years ahead of schedule.

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