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Franklin County Coroner Dan Blasdel has been fighting for a juried-review into the shooting of a Pasco, Washington, farmworker for more than a year. Wednesday, Franklin County officials promised they’d fund the inquest on the death of Antonio Zambrano-Montes.

Two of the three brothers accused in last week’s fatal shooting at a Seattle homeless encampment have juvenile records. But neither qualified for supervised parole after they were released from juvenile lock-up.

Schools shooters often threaten violence before they act. But according to an FBI guide to school shootings, students who hear these threats rarely tell an adult.

Security forces are now in control of a university in Pakistan, hours after militants stormed the campus firing on students and teachers. Officials are still tallying the casualties; so far, at least 20 people are reported dead.

The four attackers died in the gun battle that followed the attack, according to local reports. No clear claim of responsibility has been made; an initial claim that attributed the violence to Pakistan's Taliban has been cast into doubt.

NPR's Philip Reeves reports:

Here's one topic Americans can bank on hearing about in next week's State of the Union address: gun control. The reaction to President Obama's announced gun-control measures this week was swift and entirely as expected. Gun-control advocates and many Democrats applauded his efforts; gun-rights groups and many Republicans loudly denounced the orders as executive overreach.

Oregon lawmakers spent the day Thursday looking at ways to prevent and respond to active shooter attacks. It comes two-and-a-half months after a gunman killed nine people at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg.

Enrique Marquez, the man who purchased the guns used in the San Bernardino, Calif., mass shooting this month, is facing criminal charges, the Department of Justice has announced.

Marquez has been charged with conspiring to commit acts of terrorism — for aborted plans authorities say he hatched with Syed Farook, the San Bernardino shooter, in 2011 and 2012 — as well as with unlawfully purchasing the firearms used in the San Bernardino attack.

A view from the Columbia Tower in downtown Seattle. Sheriff John Urquhart offered three tips on what to do if a shooter enters a building: run, hide or fight like hell -- in that order.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Three things you can do when a mean-mugging man with an assault rifle blazes into your office, according to King County Sheriff John Urquhart:

“The first is run,” Urquhart said. “Go out a back door, go out the front door if you can, break out a window, climb out a window.”

Plan B: Hide. Go into an office, barricade the door and keep quiet until you’re sure police are on the other side of that door.

Your third option is to be fierce.

President Obama's request that American Muslims help "root out" and confront extremist ideology in their communities is getting mixed reactions. Muslim leaders say they want to help, but some are not happy that they are being singled out.

Aliya, Batoul and Amina Al-Sadi. Aliya Al-Sadi, a student at the University of Washington, spoke with her older sister Amina, a KUOW producer, about how she processed the San Bernardino shootings.
Courtesy of Amina Al-Sadi

After the deadly shooting in San Bernardino, California last week Muslims across the country held their breath.

Was the shooter a Muslim? They hoped not.

On the day of the mass shooting in San Bernardino, Calif., the city's SWAT team was training for an active shooter situation just minutes away from the scene of the massacre.

"We were just working through scenarios when this call went out," says Lt. Travis Walker, the SWAT team commander.

This post was updated Dec. 1, 2016, with information regarding the victims in the year following the shooting

The San Bernardino County Sheriff's office released the names of the 14 people killed during a mass shooting at Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, Calif., on Wednesday.

The victims ranged in age from 26 to 60.

'Week in Review' panel Melanie McFarland, Dan Savage, Rob McKenna and KUOW's Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Was the UW women’s crew coach inspiring his athletes, psychologically abusing them,  or something in between? Also, how do we honor American history when it wasn’t always honorable? And, we all react to shooting after shooting after shooting.

Bill Radke’s guests inclue Stranger editorial director Dan Savage, former Washington Attorney General Rob McKenna, and McTelevision’s Melanie McFarland; plus Seattle Times sportswriter Geoff Baker.

Guns line the walls of the firearms reference collection at the Washington Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Washington, D.C.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

“Crazy.” “Frustrated.” “Cynical.” “Disgusted. It makes me embarrassed to be a human being.”

Those are some KUOW listener responses to the mass shooting that left 14 people dead in San Bernardino, California. Friday on KUOW's Week in Review, Bill Radke talked to Dan Savage of The Stranger, journalist and TV critic Melanie McFarland and former state Attorney General Rob McKenna about gun control in the aftermath.

A story about a deadly terrorist attack briefly inspired a frenzied media scrum Friday morning in Southern California when dozens of reporters and TV news crews entered the home of the two shooters in the San Bernardino massacre.

The FBI said it is officially investigating Wednesday's mass shooting that killed at least 14 people in San Bernardino, Calif., as a terrorist act.

"We are now investigating these horrific acts as an act of terrorism," David Bowdich, assistant director of the FBI's Los Angeles office, announced during a news conference Friday. He said the shooters had attempted to erase their digital footprints and that agents had recovered two deliberately destroyed cellphones.

As yet another mass shooting claimed the lives of 14 people Wednesday in San Bernardino, Calif., a familiar refrain echoed from the lips of politicians: Pray.

But for many fed up with the now seemingly routine shootings and the resulting inaction from each over how to stop another tragedy, pleas to God weren't enough anymore.

Two suspects died in a gunfight with police after a mass shooting in San Bernardino, Calif., on Wednesday. The attack at a county employee holiday party at the Inland Regional Center left 14 people dead and 17 others wounded.

San Bernardino Police Chief Jarrod Burguan said Syed Farook, 28, an American citizen, and Tashfeen Malik, 27, were killed when police chased the suspects' SUV and exchanged fire.

Bryan Soriano holds a photo of him with daughter Gia before her first and only Homecoming dance.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Before the first anniversary of the shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School, some family members of the victims appeared publicly to press for access to records related to the case.  

Last Oct. 24, freshman Jaylen Fryberg shot five students in the school cafeteria; one survived. Fryberg then shot himself.

Guns line the walls of the firearms reference collection at the Washington Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Washington, D.C.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Jeannie Yandel sits down with security professional Scott McArthur to discuss the rise of threat assessment teams across the county that work to intervene and prevent violent incidents like mass shootings. McArthur is president of the Northwest chapter of the Association of Threat Assessment Professionals. 

Rebecka Carnes, Quinn Cooper and Lucas Eibel were memorialized in separate services Saturday in Myrtle Creek and Roseburg, Oregon. The 18-year-olds were were shot dead in class at Umpqua Community College October 1.

As the debate over gun ownership and gun control is renewed following the shooting deaths of nine people, including the gunman, at an Oregon community college earlier this month, there's the voice of an evangelical leader whose views might be different from what some would expect.

After Thursday's mass shooting at an Oregon community college, which left nine people dead and more injured, President Obama aired his frustration over gun laws in the U.S. At a news conference Friday, he called on voters to push their representatives to take action.

"You just have to, for a while, be a single-issue voter, because that's what is happening on the other side," Obama said. "And that's going to take some time. I mean, the NRA has had a good start."

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

"It can not be this easy for somebody who wants to inflict harm on other people to get his or her hands on a gun," President Obama said Thursday.
AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

President Obama gave impassioned remarks Thursday calling for stricter gun laws following a deadly shooting in Oregon. He spoke for just over 10 minutes, excoriating Congress for refusing to pass gun reform legislation. He also called on state legislatures, governors to act and on regular Americans to "think about how they can get our government to change these laws" which, he said, "will require a change of politics on this issue."

An aerial view of the Umpqua Community College campus, where a mass shooting took place on Thursday.
Google Earth

ROSEBURG, Ore. — Armed with multiple guns, a 26-year-old man walked into a writing class at the community college in this rural Oregon town and opened fire.

At least nine people were killed by the gunman and seven others were wounded Thursday. One witness said the attacker demanded to know students' religion before shooting them. It was the fourth day of class at Umpqua Community College.

People upset about the decision not to charge three Pasco, Washington, police officers after the fatal February shooting of Mexican orchard worker Antonio Zambrano-Montes are planning a vigil Thursday afternoon.

Photos of the students shot at Marysville-Pilchuck High School are seen in a memorial last year.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

  • The aunt of a teenage girl who dated the Marysville-Pilchuck High School shooter says releasing her text messages could inflame the community and haunt her for the rest of her life. 
  • The Everett Herald KUOW and other media organizations have filed briefs advocating for the texts to be made public.
  • Her request is expected to be heard in Snohomish County Superior Court on Thursday. 

Advocates for a teenage girl caught up in the investigation of last year’s shootings at Marysville-Pilchuck High School say releasing her personal text messages from that time would re-traumatize her and potentially subject her to threats and reprisals.

The girl did not attend the high school but was the former girlfriend of Jaylen Fryberg and friends with his victims.

Art in the halls at Marysville-Pilchuck High School following the mass shooting last October.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

As students at Marysville-Pilchuck High School head back to class, the devastating shooting last fall will return to headlines.

A report scheduled to be released Monday is said to contain horrific details from hundreds of students who were in the cafeteria that day.

Neighbors, police and pastors gather at a vigil for Torrence Spillers.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Get outside. Talk to your neighbors.

That’s the advice of Minister Gregory Banks of First A.M.E. Church.

He was talking about the recent spate of shootings in central and south Seattle. Shooting incidents in the city have increased 33 percent over last year.

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