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Other than vodka, the Russian product most familiar to Americans is probably the anti-virus software made by Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab.

The crew of an unidentified 'sturgeon class' submarine like the U.S.S. Parche, in 1980
PHC Robert K. Hemmerly/Dept of Defense Still Media Collection,

Bremerton, just across the Puget Sound from Seattle, is a military town. On the ferry ride over, you can sometimes see aircraft carriers and submarines. But there’s another kind of defense industry set to grow in and around Bremerton, too. An industry that defends us against cyber warfare, and it benefits from the area’s military expertise.


2017 is the first full summer the Sea-Tac airport is using displays that show the wait time for each security checkpoint.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

The Port of Seattle is cutting down on passenger wait times at security screening checkpoints.

Washington state legislators appear to have bought extra time for travelers who use a standard driver's license to pass through airport security. The Oregon Legislature is plodding down a similar path to make identity card security upgrades demanded by the federal government.

The FBI said it is officially investigating Wednesday's mass shooting that killed at least 14 people in San Bernardino, Calif., as a terrorist act.

"We are now investigating these horrific acts as an act of terrorism," David Bowdich, assistant director of the FBI's Los Angeles office, announced during a news conference Friday. He said the shooters had attempted to erase their digital footprints and that agents had recovered two deliberately destroyed cellphones.

They connect via online services — especially Twitter — and in everyday life. Their ages range from 15 to 47, and their roles range from cheering attacks to plotting violence. And curbing their growth is a dynamic challenge without a simple solution: There are currently 900 active investigations into ISIS sympathizers in every American state.

Those are some of the findings of a new study that glimpses life "inside the bubble of American ISIS sympathizers, a diverse and diffuse scene that the FBI estimates include hundreds, if not thousands, of individuals."

A controversial government surveillance program has come to an end. As of midnight, the United States National Security Agency has stopped the bulk collection of the metadata from Americans' phone calls.

Ezra Stoller.

Mayor David Bowers of Roanoke, Virginia, doesn't want any Syrians resettled in his community. He suggested US officials draw inspiration for how to deal with Syrians from how Japanese Americans were treated during World War II. He even lauded the internment camps many Japanese Americans were confined to during the war.

Jay Inslee says he won't join the growing list of governors who say they don't want Syrian refugees within their state borders.

In an interview with NPR's Morning Edition, the governor of Washington state publicly welcomed refugees, citing the inscription on the Statue of Liberty, warning fellow governors against "fear," and insisting that background checks minimize whatever risk the refugees may pose.

A handful of fairly-famous Eastern Washington winemakers and cult foodies have strong roots in France. One of them, Walla Walla winemaker Gilles Nicault, has felt really far away from his family in the wake of the ISIS attack on Paris.

At a news conference in Turkey on Monday, President Obama defended his administration's strategy against ISIS, calling Friday's deadly terrorist attacks in Paris "outrageous." He said, however, the U.S. would not send additional ground troops into Syria to combat the Islamic State.

A Southern California college student studying abroad in Paris was one of the 129 killed Friday.

Nohemi Gonzalez was 23 years old.

Her family called her Mimi. She was left-handed and had a tattoo of Pocahontas on her left arm. At the vigil held for her at Cal State Long Beach on Sunday night, her classmates, family and faculty wore feathers in her honor as the choir sang.

It was a somber affair, but everyone who got up to speak talked about how Gonzalez was anything but.

People gather Saturday at La Parisienne bakery in Seattle's Belltown to show support after the terrorist attacks in Paris.
KUOW photo/Kate Walters

The French anthem and cries of "Vive la France" swelled in Seattle's Belltown after a minute of silence Saturday for those killed and injured in the Paris attacks.

The death toll in a coordinated and ruthless attack on six different targets in and around Paris has risen to 129, with 352 people injured, according to Paris prosecutor Francois Molins. He added that 99 people were critically wounded.

Speaking nearly 24 hours after the start of Friday night's attacks, Molins outlined the sequence of the attacks, and said investigators had traced records related to one of the vehicles they used to Belgium, where three arrests were made.

Friday's attacks in Paris that killed more than 100 people could weigh heavily on tonight's Democratic debate, with White House hopefuls pressed anew on how they would combat terrorism and a growing threat from ISIS. The debate's initial focus will be on the attacks, as to be expected, according to a source with knowledge of debate preparations.

Updated at 12:10 p.m. ET

Paris is largely shut down Saturday, as investigators work to identify those behind Friday night's coordinated terror attacks, which killed 129 people and wounded more than 350. The Eiffel Tower and other public gathering spaces are closed.

World shows its support for France after deadly attacks

Nov 13, 2015
Shane McMillan

In speeches, light shows and across social media, an outpouring of support arose for France after terrorists shot through Paris in a series of attacks deadlier than anything the capital had seen since World War II on the night of November 13. 

President Barack Obama characterized the killings as  an attack on all of humanity, and US presidential candidates offered condolences. Germany offered to send security forces.

Updated 11:29 p.m. ET

Paris prosecutor Francois Molins says there have been six attacks in and around the city, and the death toll could exceed 120. The majority of those killed were in a concert hall.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports that French police stormed and took control of a concert hall, and two attackers there were killed. Molins says at least five attackers in total have been killed.

Victims lay on the pavement outside a Paris restaurant after an attack on Friday, Nov. 13, 2015.
AP Photo/Thibault Camus

Dozens of people were reported killed Friday night in shootings at several places in Paris, the BBC and The Associated Press reported.

After covert tests revealed major security failures, the acting director of the Transportation Security Administration has been reassigned.

In a statement, Jeh Johnson, secretary of homeland security, said Melvin Carraway will now work at the department's Office of State and Local Law Enforcement.

Three controversial provisions of the Patriot Act expired Sunday night, ending — among other things — the government's ability to collect bulk metadata on Americans' phone calls and emails.

The fight pits Sen. Rand Paul and other legislators fighting for greater privacy against fellow Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell and others who are in favor of extending the legislation as is. But if the lawmakers are looking to their constituents for direction, they might not get much help.

Fake and stolen passports have become a huge international problem — and it turns out security agents, who should be able to catch them, have blind spots like the rest of us.

Life After Blowing The Whistle On The NSA

Feb 6, 2014
Flickr Photo/Project On Government Oversight

Steve Scher talks with former NSA senior executive Thomas Drake about his experience before, during and after blowing the whistle on fraud and abuse in the United States government.

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode The End Of Privacy.

About Mikko Hyppönen's TED Talk

Virtually every international Internet user is being watched, says hacker and cyber security expert Mikko Hyppönen. He calls for digital privacy in the age of government surveillance.

About Mikko Hyppönen

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

Ross Reynolds talks with David Cole, a constitutional law professor at Georgetown University, about President Obama's proposed changes to the National Security Agency program.

Has President Obama Lived Up To His Promise To Protect Civil Liberties?

Dec 30, 2013
Obama arrives for a meeting with Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak at the presidential palace in Cairo June 4, 2009.
Flickr Photo/Muhammad Ghafari (CC BY 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/6uPiGf

Steve Scher talks with David Cole, constitutional lawyer and national security expert, about how the state of security has changed post 9/11 and whether or not President Obama's civil liberty record holds up to his promises.

UW Students Learn To Hack For Your Safety

Nov 14, 2013
Flickr Photo/Alexandre Dulaunoy

What do kids who play capture the flag on summer breaks do when they grow up and go to college? Turns out, the same thing – only the game evolves to computer security and privacy puzzles in a trend that’s being called “ethical hacking.”

2017 is the first full summer the Sea-Tac airport is using displays that show the wait time for each security checkpoint.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

The Transportation Security Administration has been quietly replacing passenger-screening machines at some of the nation’s largest airports. The TSA has been moving them to smaller airports and replacing them with security scanners that don’t use X-rays.

The New York Times says Washington state’s online voter registration system is not secure. Ross Reynolds talks with Washington's assistant secretary of state, Steve Excell.