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Seattle Seahawks

What Happened This Week? Thanks For Asking

Jan 16, 2015
Seattle Seahawks' Marshawn Lynch watches the closing moments of an NFL football game against the Arizona Cardinals on Dec. 21, 2014.
AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin

An engineer said “catastrophic failure” in the same breath as “Bertha” – what does that mean? Washington state has America's most regressive tax system, is that about to change? Should Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch have to talk to the media if he doesn’t want to? And if you weren’t born in the Pacific Northwest, can you ever truly fit in?

The Patriots and Seahawks host the AFC and NFC Conference Championship games on Sunday. New England meets the Indianapolis Colts for the AFC crown. Seattle entertains the Green Bay Packers for the NFC crown.

The winners of those two games will kick off against each other in Super Bowl XLIX on Sunday February 1 in Glendale, Arizona. Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca joins host Robin Young to preview the games.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The Green Bay Packers are the only community-owned NFL team.
Flickr Photo/Ken Fager (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Dave Zirin, sports editor of The Nation magazine, about the Green Bay Packers, the only community-owned NFL team.

Flickr Photo/U.S. Fish & Wildlife (CC-BY-NC-ND)

There is no such thing as a seahawk, but you super fans probably knew that already.

“Seahawk is one of those colloquial terms much like a sparrowhawk or buzzard or seagull,” said ornithologist John Klicka of the University of Washington's Burke Museum. “From a sort of a scientific perspective there's no such thing.”

Seattle running back Marshawn Lynch makes a run against the Baltimore Ravens at CenturyLink Field in 2011.
Flickr Photo/JBLM PAO (CC0-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks to John Vidale who explains how local seismologists are harnessing the power of Seahawks fans to test new earthquake sensor technology. Vidale is a professor of earth and space science at University of Washington and the director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, which allows you to track the shaking of CenturyLink Field during the Seahawks game.

Seattle Seahawk fans at Century Link Field.
Flickr Photo/Joe Parks (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Yes, you're loud. But it's not drowning out the opposing team or pumping up Marshawn Lynch that's giving the Seahawks an edge at home. Bill Radke talks with Sports Illustrated's Jon Wertheim about what home-field advantage really boils down to.

Century Link Field, Seattle.
Flickr Photo/John Seb Barber (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Dave Zirin, sports writer for The Nation, about how the recent federal raids to inspect illegal drug use are just one of many signs that the relationship between the federal government and professional football is changing.

Agents from the Drug Enforcement Agency conducted surprise inspections of the staff of at least three National Football League teams on Sunday.

CNN reports:

"The DEA questioned the medical and training staffs of the San Francisco 49ers following the team's 16-10 victory at the New York Giants, agency spokesman Rusty Payne told CNN.

Jason Fox shaves the Seahawks logo into a loyal 12's hair.
KUOw Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Jeannie Yandel talks with barber Jason Fox about shaving the Seattle Seahawk into the hair of Seahawks fans outside CenturyLink Field before Seahawks home games. 

Flickr Photo/Jory (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

To improve Seattle traffic, what if your child in the backseat no longer gets you into the HOV lane? Good idea? Also: Is Backpage.com liable for sex trafficking through its site? Would expanded gun background checks lead to gun confiscation? And will anyone really give marijuana candy to trick-or-treaters? Really?

Bill Radke’s guests this week: Dan Savage, Rob McKenna and Joni Balter; plus Slate’s Mike Pesca, LiveWire’s Luke Burbank and the NRA’s Catherine Mortensen.

AP Photo/John Froschauer

Yesterday, at the end of the fourth quarter, the Seattle Seahawks and Denver Broncos were tied. That triggered overtime. The referee tossed a coin, Denver's quarterback called tails and it was heads. So Seattle got the ball, scored a touchdown -- and the game was over.

That’s it.

Denver never got the ball, never got a chance to score.

Flickr Photo/Hammerin Man (CC-BY-NC-ND)

School is back in session. Washington state lawmakers are not in session, but they were still in the principal's office this week. Also in trouble: bikini baristas and Christopher Columbus. Bill Radke discusses it all with Joni Balter, Knute Berger, Essex Porter and Luke Burbank.

Flickr Photo/scottlum (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Sport Press Northwest co-founder Art Thiel about his new book about the Seattle Seahawks' Super Bowl-winning quarterback called "Russell Wilson: Standing Tall."

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Cornerback Richard Sherman may be the most famous ranter on the Seattle Seahawks, but last Tuesday the team signed a player known for his own tirade.

Offensive lineman Eric Winston was with the Kansas City Chiefs two seasons ago when his quarterback, Matt Cassel, got knocked out with a concussion during a home game.

Saying the Seattle Seahawks kept San Francisco 49ers fans from being able to pull for their team in January's NFC title game, a 49ers fan is suing the NFL, claiming the practice of limiting ticket sales to pro-Seahawks markets amounts to "economic discrimination." He is seeking $50 million in damages.

As hosts of the playoff game, the Seahawks limited credit-card sales of tickets to accounts with billing addresses in a list of nearby states. California wasn't on that list, which included parts of Canada and Hawaii. As a resident of Nevada, John E. Williams III was shut out.

Courtesy of Rae Ellen Bichell

About a dozen Seattle Seahawks and Sounders FC players visited the Darrington area Monday.

In a statement the Seahawks company said the teams wanted to offer a brief distraction for families devastated by the landslide near Oso, Wash.

KUOW Photo/Debrah Wang

Microsoft picks Satya Nadella to succeed Steve Ballmer as CEO, and hundreds of thousands of Seahawks fans pour into downtown to celebrate Seattle’s first-ever Super Bowl victory.

Steve Scher talks with Crosscut’s Knute Berger, Eli Sanders of The Stranger and news analyst Joni Balter about this week's top stories.

Seattle Celebrates Seahawks’ Super Bowl Victory

Feb 5, 2014
Flickr Photo/Anne and Tim

A sea of fans flooded downtown Seattle on Wednesday as the Seahawks Super Bowl victory parade crawled its way from Seattle Center to CenturyLink Field.

Flickr Photo/Washington State House Republicans

Steve Scher checks in with KUOW's Austin Jenkins about the latest news from Olympia, including how lawmakers are handling Seahawks fever.

Flickr Photo/Trevor Dykstra

Steve Scher and Marcie Sillman chat with Crosscut's Knute Berger and listeners about what the Seattle Seahawks' Super Bowl title means to them and to the city.

Flickr Photo/Russell Wilson

Marcie Sillman talks with Rob Asghar, Forbes' contributing writer and management and communications consultant, about the leadership style of Seattle Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll.

KUOW Photo/Deb Wang

Thousands of Seahawks fans in Seattle took to the streets to celebrate the team's first Super Bowl win Sunday night.

While the celebrations were largely peaceful, fans in the University District near Greek row used furniture to start bonfires. The Seattle Times reported one arrest in the area.

The Seattle Seahawks defeated the Denver Broncos 43-8 to win Super Bowl XLVIII at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. on Sunday night, the first Super Bowl victory in the team's history.

The game got off to an odd start on the first play from scrimmage when Broncos center Manny Ramirez snapped the ball past quarterback Peyton Manning, who was walking up to the line and didn't have his hands ready. That set the tone for the trouncing the Broncos would receive over the course of the night at the hands of the voracious Seahawks.

Courtesy of World Vision

While football fans are eagerly watching the Super Bowl, stores and manufacturers will be likewise poised for the final outcome to set in motion a landslide of merchandise to cater to the winners.

The deluge of hype, buildup, beer and pizza ads will be over on Sunday, because either the Seattle Seahawks or the Denver Broncos will rise victorious out of the swamps of Jersey — raising high the trophy that goes to the winner of Super Bowl XLVIII. Back in the hometowns, the fans are gearing up.

Flickr Photo/Mike Morris

Steve Scher checks in with Mike Pesca, NPR sports correspondent and voice on Slate's 'Hang Up and Listen' podcast, about why he thinks the Seattle Seahawks will come out victorious against the Denver Broncos this Super Bowl Sunday.

KPCC Photo/Ben Bergman

The Seattle Seahawks and the Denver Broncos will be facing off in New Jersey in Super Bowl XLVIII this weekend. In Los Angeles there will also be a contest, of two rival sports bars.

Flickr Photo/Matthew Black

David Hyde catches up with Jerry Brewer, Seattle Times columnist and radio host, about what it's like to cover the Super Bowl.

Flickr Photo/Mark Samia

A post-NFC championship game interview with Richard Sherman causes controversy. Is Seattle the "bad guy" in the Super Bowl narrative? Plus, Bertha stays stuck, and the Eastside Catholic School president steps down.

We review these stories and more with news analyst Joni Balter, Crosscut's Knute Berger and The Stranger's Eli Sanders. Plus, we hear from Live Wire host Luke Burbank.

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