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Seattle Police Department

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Seattle officials plan to seek changes to the obscure union appeals process that has allowed reversals of police misconduct findings.

Flickr Photo/Crash Zone Photography

A new policy for the Seattle Police Department aims to change how officers handle crisis situations with people who are mentally ill or under the influence. The crisis intervention policy, which takes effect Monday, is part of the city’s federally-mandated police reforms.

Flickr Photo/ME659! (CC BY-NC-ND)

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray sets things straight after a reversal of police misconduct cases kicked up some dust.

State lawmakers reach a compromise over whether student test scores should factor in teacher evaluations, and the City Council regulates Seattle's ridesharing companies.

Steve Scher reviews these stories and more with Crosscut’s Knute Berger, Eli Sanders of The Stranger, news analyst Joni Balter and Livewire's Luke Burbank.

Balter: Seattle Mayor's Honeymoon Is Ebbing

Feb 27, 2014
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Ed Murray is two months into his new term as Seattle's mayor. Seattle Times news analyst Joni Balter says Murray was off to a strong start, but events in the past week mean "the hotel has slid the bill under the door, the honeymoon is winding down."

Flickr Photo/Dmitri Fedortchenko (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with retired judge Anne Levinson about how Interim Seattle Police Chief Harry Bailey is handling police officer misconduct cases. Levinson is the independent auditor for the Seattle Police Department's Office of Professional Accountability.

Courtesy of Seattle Police

It’s a terrible feeling: walking out of a Seattle farmers market with your fresh rutabaga only to find that your bike is missing from where you parked it.

Detective Sergeant Cindy Granard can relate. “That can be a great tragedy – being a former bike officer I understand that.”

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Workers protest outside Seattle's fast-food restaurants to draw attention to income inequality, and the Seattle's interim police chief's recent disciplinary decision raises questions about which direction police reform is headed.

Also Washington cuts the size of legal marijuana grows after receiving nearly 3,000 applications for a state license.

Steve Scher reviews these stories and more with Crosscut’s Knute Berger, Eli Sanders of The Stranger, news analyst Joni Balter and Livewire's Luke Burbank.

Seattle police patrol cars.
Flickr Photo/Brittney Bollay (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle City Councilmember Bruce Harrell about a proposal that would allow the Seattle Police Department to use facial recognition software to identify suspects from security footage.

Seattle police patrol cars.
Flickr Photo/Brittney Bollay

Marcie Sillman talks with Bill Hobson, executive director of the Downtown Emergency Service Center, about the Seattle Police Department's new policy for dealing with people who have mental illnesses or drug and alcohol issues. Hobson is also a member of Seattle's Community Police Commission.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

A legal organization in Seattle said that interim chief of the Seattle Police Department Harry Bailey’s comments about a recent officer-involved shooting will make it harder for investigators to do their jobs and undermine the troubled department's commitment to reform.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Seattle’s ongoing effort to reform the police department seems to be shifting to a new phase, from policy to implementation. Seattle Mayor Ed Murray says 2014 will be “the year of training” for Seattle cops.

Flickr Photo/Dmitri Fedortchenko

Steve Scher talks with Seattle Times reporter Steve Miletich about the changes at the Seattle Police Department.

NPR Photo/Martin Kaste

The Seattle Police Department made national headlines when officers gave away bags of Doritos at last year’s Hempfest. But some police officers were not supportive of the department’s lighthearted approach to marijuana users.

Flickr Photo/ME659! (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with former Seattle Police Chief Norm Stamper about a new city policy that allows the police chief to hire top command staff from outside the department.

Flickr Photo/Joe Szilagyi

Marcie Sillman sits down with new Seattle's Mayor Ed Murray to talk about a range of issues currently facing the city.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The eyes of the nation descended on Seattle city hall this week as Mayor Ed Murray and City Councilmember Kshama Sawant took office. In one of his first acts, the mayor named Harry Bailey Seattle's new interim police chief. Also, the Washington State Department of Transportation announced the 520 bridge project will need a lot more money to get completed.

We review these stories and more with news analyst Joni Balter, The Stranger's Eli Sanders and Crosscut's Knute Berger. Plus, we hear from Live Wire host Luke Burbank.

From Gerald Hankerson's Facebook page.

Marcie Sillman talks with King County NAACP president Gerald Hankerson about Murray's new appointment of Harry Bailey as the interim police chief.

Ross Reynolds talks to KUOW reporter Amy Radil about Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's appointment of former assistant chief Harry Bailey as the new interim police chief to replace Jim Pugel.

Flickr Photo/Blanca Garcia Gil

Marcie Sillman interviews Jim Pugel, Seattle Police Department's interim chief, about new policies on the use of force that was signed off by a federal judge.

Wikimedia Commons/Joe Mabel

Beginning next year Seattle police officers will be required to carry at least one weapon such as pepper spray in addition to their service revolvers.

From Wikipedia.

The world remembers Nelson Mandela, the Seattle Police Department shakes up its top ranks and supporters of a $15-an-hour minimum wage walk from SeaTac to Seattle. We talk over those stories and more of the week's news with Joni Balter of the Seattle Times, The Stranger's Eli Sanders and Crosscut's Knute Berger.

Week In Review Extra

Seattle police patrol cars.
Flickr Photo/Brittney Bollay

Steve Scher talks with Seattle Times reporter Steve Miletich about federal monitor Merrick Bobb's draft report on reform efforts at the Seattle Police Department.

AP Photo/Royal Canadian Mounted Police

UPDATE 10/23/13, 6:20 p.m. PT: According to Dan Donohue, spokesman for the King County prosecutor office, the assault claim against Michael Sean Stanley remains under investigation and has not yet been referred to prosecutors.

Original Post

A man described by Canadian police as a sexually violent predator pleaded not guilty in court on Wednesday morning to the misdemeanor charge of harassment after being arrested on Tuesday in West Seattle. 

Flickr Photo/Crash Zone Photography

Pierce Murphy is the new civilian director for Seattle Police Department's Office of Professional Accountability. Both SPD and OPA have been under tight scrutiny since a Department of Justice's 2011 investigation found evidence of biased policing and unlawful use of force. Murphy says his first task is restoring credibility for the OPA. Marcie Sillman talks with Murphy.

AP Photo/Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Update: Michael Sean Stanley has registered as a sex offender in Washington state. 

A man described by Seattle police as a “sexually violent predator” has been located in downtown Seattle but will not be arrested.

Google Maps

A woman in her 20s was found shot dead at 4:30 a.m. on Friday morning just off the Burke-Gilman trail in Seattle’s Wallingford neighborhood.

Police believe this was a targeted hit and that the woman was not killed at random. Officers have not yet identified the woman, according to a police spokesman.

A passerby found the woman on the popular trail at North Northlake Way and Eastern Avenue North and called 911.

Homicide detectives initially cleared the area and have since reopened the trail to pedestrians and cyclists.

Flickr Photo/clappstar

The Seattle Police Department has had a difficult couple of years. A strongly critical Department of Justice report found widespread excessive use of force. A federal judge is now overseeing a plan to fix the problem. 

But one bright spot in the media has been the police presence on the web and social media. Contrary to what you might expect, SPD's blog is pretty entertaining. For example one web post, MarijWhatNow, about how Seattle police would deal with legalized marijuana, drew worldwide attention and earned the "best new thing in the world today" title from the Rachel Maddow Show.

Seattle police patrol cars.
Flickr Photo/Brittney Bollay (CC BY-NC-ND)

Three out of four Seattle residents think the Seattle Police do a good job keeping the public safe.  But the police get much worse reviews from the city’s African-American and Latino communities. Seventy percent of African-Americans and 62 percent of Latinos think the department often uses excessive force.

Courtesy Lincoln Beauregard and Lee Rousso.

Attorneys for a man convicted of stealing a car in South Seattle two years ago have filed suit against the Seattle Police Department and one of its officers.

Flickr Photo/Vancouver Film School

  SPD Interim Chief Jim Pugel
Thirty-year SPD veteran Jim Pugel was appointed interim police chief in April. He took over a department facing major reforms to address federal claims of biased policing and excessive use of force. What progress is being made to comply with Department of Justice reforms? Is the SPD making progress on Mayor Mike McGinn’s 2020 police reform plan? What questions do you have for Seattle police chief Jim Pugel? Send a message to Weekday.  
 
A Visit To Stunt School
Summer movies are full of stunts performed by professionals. Ever wonder how they’re trained? Often, they go to stunt school. Katy Sewall stopped by while students were learning how to safely kick someone in the groin.

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

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