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Seattle Police Department

Crowds of homeless people often gather on the sidewalks of downtown Seattle near social-service providers.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Ross Reynolds speaks with Katherine Beckett, co-author with Steven Herbert of the book, "Banished: The New Social Control in Urban America," about her research into interactions between the Seattle Police Department and people experiencing homelessness in downtown Seattle.

Reporter Dominic Holden at his going-away roast after departing The Stranger,  Nov. 1, 2014. Holden submitted a complaint to the SPD after an incident in July 2013.
Joe Mabel

In the summer of 2013, Seattle journalist Dominic Holden, a reporter for The Stranger, filed a complaint with Seattle’s Office of Professional Accountability, saying a police officer tried to harass and intimidate him. The OPA sustained his complaint, saying the officer had broken rules on professional courtesy and deserved a one-day suspension without pay. The case was closed.

Then in February last year, Holden heard indirectly that the officer had appealed the finding. Interim SPD Chief Harry Bailey had reached a settlement with the officer in which the misconduct finding was, in fact, reversed.

Seattle Police guard a building during protests on Dec. 6, 2014, in response to the killings of Michael Brown in Missouri and Eric Garner in New York.
Flickr Photo/Scott Lum (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Lisa Daugaard, policy director for the Public Defender Association and a long-time follower of police reform in Seattle, about how a decades-old city ordinance may hinder Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole's efforts to reform the department.

OPA Director Pierce Murphy moved his offices out of SPD last year to make them more accessible for the public.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Complaints to Seattle’s police oversight office have risen dramatically in the first weeks of 2015. But officials say that’s not necessarily an indication of problems at SPD. It just means word about the organization is getting out.

TRANSCRIPT

If a Seattle resident has a complaint about an interaction with a police officer, they’re supposed to contact the city’s Office of Professional Accountability.

Only a fraction of those public inquiries are ultimately investigated for possible misconduct and officer discipline.

File photo of Seattle Police at Greenwood Parade in 2008.
Flickr Photo/Natalie Wilkie (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Sue Rahr, executive director of the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission, about a  police training program called Blue Courage. Rahr hopes this program will be a step toward changing police culture.

AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

Ross Reynolds talks with Washington state Sen. Pramila Jayapal about a proposed bill that would place tight restrictions on footage collected by police body cameras. Reynolds also talks with James McMahan, policy director for the Washington Association of Sheriffs & Police Chiefs.

12 seahawks
Flickr Photo/Yuri Levchenko (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seahawks fever is alive and well across the state, with cities taking on nicknames in advance of the new name: Shermmamish, Pete Angeles, Hawkilteo. We could go on… and we will. Also, this week: Why did a Seattle police officer hassle a 69-year-old man over a golf club? Will Washington state abolish the death penalty? Should cyclists have to pay a toll to roll on the new 520 bridge? And why is Bill Gates worried about artificial intelligence?

Bill Radke makes sense of these stories and more with Crosscut's Knute Berger, The Stranger's Eli Sanders and news analyst Joni Balter.

Since his arrest last year, William Wingate, a 70-year-old veteran and retired bus driver, no longer stands up for the Seattle Police Department in conversations with his siblings.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The Seattle Police officer involved in a case involving the arrest of a senior citizen has been reassigned to a job where she has no contact with the public.

The move follows public outcry over a dashboard video showing the arrest of William Wingate, an elderly black man who had been standing on a Capitol Hill corner, leaning on his golf club.

In this screenshot from a video provided by the Seattle Police Department, William Wingate is seen using a golf club like a cane when confronted by Officer Cynthia Whitlatch on July 9, 2014, in Seattle.
YouTube

Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole has ordered a review of an officer in the East Precinct.

The police department said the officer was involved in the controversial arrest of a 69-year-old man last summer who was holding a golf club. SPD said it has apologized for the arrest.

A national campaign has highlighted the thousands of untested sexual assault kits held by police. Now the Seattle Police Department has pledged to send every sexual assault kit for testing by the state crime lab.

Jeannie Yandel talks with Mary Ellen Stone about a new Seattle Police Department policy to conduct DNA testing on all sexual assault evidence kits. Stone is executive director of the King County Sexual Assault Resource Center. Yandel also talks with KUOW reporter Amy Radil about SPD's new policy.

Christopher Monfort is escorted into the courtroom on the first day of his trial for murdering SPD Officer Timothy Brenton, along with other charges, on Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Opening arguments were heard Tuesday in the trial of Christopher Monfort. He’s accused of killing Seattle Police Officer Timothy Brenton in 2009.

Jurors will have to determine whether they believe Monfort was sane at the time of the shooting.

Monfort was shot and paralyzed during his arrest by police. He uses a wheelchair; court sessions will be shorter than usual to accommodate his medical concerns.

Opening arguments start today in King County Superior Court in the trial of Christopher Monfort, accused of killing Seattle police officer Timothy Brenton in 2009. If found guilty, Monfort could face the death penalty. Bill Radke talks with KUOW reporter Amy Radil ahead of the trial.

Seattle Police officers in the old uniform (left) and newly redesigned uniform (right).
Courtesy of Seattle Police Department

The Seattle Police Department is rolling out new looks for its shield, uniforms and police cars. Gone are the “light blue bubble” cars and “theme park” uniforms as the department ushers in a darker, sleeker style.

Cal McAllister, founder of local advertising agency The Wexley School for Girls, told KUOW’s Marcie Sillman on The Record that in a lot of ways it’s an improvement. The uniform retains a confident blue color, but is less busy and decorative.

King County Jail in downtown Seattle.
King County Photo

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray is protesting a new King County policy to release more felony suspects after booking them. King County says it’s a budget decision involving nonviolent offenders. The mayor says it’s a threat to public safety.

AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

Ross Reynolds talks with Fusion correspondent Dan Lieberman about the impact of police body cameras on police shootings and use-of-force incidents.

Timothy Clemans (left) and Seattle Police COO Mike Wagers at the hackathon, Friday, December 19, 2014.
KUOW Photo/John O'Brien

The Seattle Police Department took an unusual step Friday to address issues surrounding the release of police video recordings: They invited area tech experts to the department’s first ever hackathon.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Mike Wagers, chief operating officer at Seattle Police Department, about how an anonymous computer programmer with an outsized data request helped prompt the Seattle Police Department's first-ever Hackathon.

Seattle Police guard a building during protests on Dec. 6, 2014, in response to the killings of Michael Brown in Missouri and Eric Garner in New York.
Flickr Photo/Scott Lum (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole about the police's response to recent Seattle protests to suspected racial bias in policing. 

In this file photo, King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg talks to reporters at a press conference in 2009.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Ross Reynolds speaks with King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg about why he decided not to bring felony charges against Seattle Police Officer Adley Shepherd.

Shepherd punched Miyekko Durden-Bosley, 23, in the face after she resisted arrest during a domestic violence call. Durden-Bosely sustained multiple fractures to her orbital socket.

File photo of homeless person in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/~C4Chaos (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Once upon a time, Jeremy Bradford saw his life spread before him; years of infinite possibility.

The Seattle native had his life together. A successful stint in the Marines had led him to a sales career. Bradford was on an upward trajectory at one of the city's best-known department stores. 

Demonstrators at a Seattle march on Nov. 25, 2014, in response to the Ferguson grand jury decision.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Marcie Sillman speaks with Sarah Stuteville, co-founder of the Seattle Globalist, about protester concerns about policing in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood.

Protesters in response to the Ferguson and Eric Garner grand jury decisions converge on downtown Seattle on Dec. 4, 2014.
Flickr Photo/Scott Lum (CC-BY-NC-ND)

  What did the Seattle protests accomplish? There were plenty to look at. We’ll separate Westlake Christmas tree chants from anarchist rocks. Also, with the Harvard Exit movie theater closing and the Stowell/Sendak Nutcracker ending, is Seattle losing its soul? And just how clean will the Duwamish River get (and how gentrified will its riverbanks become)?

Bill Radke reviews the news with Eli Sanders, Knute Berger and Joni Balter. Plus, KUOW EarthFix reporter Ashley Ahearn.

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle-King County NAACP President Gerald Hankerson about police reform in Seattle in the wake recent events in Ferguson, Missouri. 

Is Seattle Any Different Than Ferguson?

Nov 25, 2014
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones
Liz Jones / KUOW

“Hands up, don’t shoot,” protesters chanted, their hands up as they streamed down Seattle streets on Monday night and Tuesday. “Black lives matter.”

They were protesting a Missouri grand jury’s decision to not indict a police officer in the fatal shooting of black teenager Michael Brown. As they protested, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray held a news conference, saying the city is committed to the goals of racial and social justice.

"We are failing our young African-American men," he said.

Beloved sandwhich shop Paseo closed suddenly this week, leading to a lot of foodie grief in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Rocky Yeh (CC-BY-NC-ND

A beloved Cuban sandwich shop falls apart. A gun-rights rally is coming to Olympia. Should police bother to find who broke into your car? Is our lieutenant governor a slacker? And what would you put into a Washington state time capsule?

Bill Radke is with Crosscut’s Knute Berger, Northwest News Network’s Phyllis Fletcher and LiveWire’s Luke Burbank to answer these questions.

Marcie Sillman speaks with KUOW reporter Amy Radil  about the changes Seattle Mayor Ed Murray made this week concerning police accountability. He’s making a citizen oversight group called the Community Police Commission permanent.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Someone pursuing a complaint about a Seattle police officer no longer needs to enter the Seattle Police Department to do so. Instead, the department’s civilian oversight director has moved his office into a space he says will be more welcoming.

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Hate crimes are up in Seattle despite the increasing efforts of Seattle Police to fight them.

Capitol Hill and downtown Seattle are hotspots for crime that involves hatred of targeted groups of people, according to Seattle Police.

Marcie Sillman sits down with KUOW reporter Amy Radil to talk about a recent meeting at the Capitol Hill precinct where Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole addressed police use of force and tickets that were issued for smoking marijuana in public.

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