Seattle Police Department

Demonstrators at a Seattle march on Nov. 25, 2014, in response to the Ferguson grand jury decision.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Marcie Sillman speaks with Sarah Stuteville, co-founder of the Seattle Globalist, about protester concerns about policing in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood.

Protesters in response to the Ferguson and Eric Garner grand jury decisions converge on downtown Seattle on Dec. 4, 2014.
Flickr Photo/Scott Lum (CC-BY-NC-ND)

  What did the Seattle protests accomplish? There were plenty to look at. We’ll separate Westlake Christmas tree chants from anarchist rocks. Also, with the Harvard Exit movie theater closing and the Stowell/Sendak Nutcracker ending, is Seattle losing its soul? And just how clean will the Duwamish River get (and how gentrified will its riverbanks become)?

Bill Radke reviews the news with Eli Sanders, Knute Berger and Joni Balter. Plus, KUOW EarthFix reporter Ashley Ahearn.

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle-King County NAACP President Gerald Hankerson about police reform in Seattle in the wake recent events in Ferguson, Missouri. 

Is Seattle Any Different Than Ferguson?

Nov 25, 2014
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones
Liz Jones / KUOW

“Hands up, don’t shoot,” protesters chanted, their hands up as they streamed down Seattle streets on Monday night and Tuesday. “Black lives matter.”

They were protesting a Missouri grand jury’s decision to not indict a police officer in the fatal shooting of black teenager Michael Brown. As they protested, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray held a news conference, saying the city is committed to the goals of racial and social justice.

"We are failing our young African-American men," he said.

Beloved sandwhich shop Paseo closed suddenly this week, leading to a lot of foodie grief in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Rocky Yeh (CC-BY-NC-ND

A beloved Cuban sandwich shop falls apart. A gun-rights rally is coming to Olympia. Should police bother to find who broke into your car? Is our lieutenant governor a slacker? And what would you put into a Washington state time capsule?

Bill Radke is with Crosscut’s Knute Berger, Northwest News Network’s Phyllis Fletcher and LiveWire’s Luke Burbank to answer these questions.

Marcie Sillman speaks with KUOW reporter Amy Radil  about the changes Seattle Mayor Ed Murray made this week concerning police accountability. He’s making a citizen oversight group called the Community Police Commission permanent.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Someone pursuing a complaint about a Seattle police officer no longer needs to enter the Seattle Police Department to do so. Instead, the department’s civilian oversight director has moved his office into a space he says will be more welcoming.

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Hate crimes are up in Seattle despite the increasing efforts of Seattle Police to fight them.

Capitol Hill and downtown Seattle are hotspots for crime that involves hatred of targeted groups of people, according to Seattle Police.

Marcie Sillman sits down with KUOW reporter Amy Radil to talk about a recent meeting at the Capitol Hill precinct where Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole addressed police use of force and tickets that were issued for smoking marijuana in public.

Seattle Police cars
Flickr Photo/ Eric Peacock (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with NPR law enforcement correspondent Martin Kaste about his two-part NPR story on the debate over use-of-force, and how it applies in Seattle.

Flickr Photo/Tariq Abdel-Monem (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seattle police officers are not using enough force.

That’s according to an internal email sent last week. The email, obtained by KUOW, says that hesitancy to use force could pose risks to officers and the public.

KUOW Photo/Michael Clinard

In the first six months of its new ordinance, the Seattle Police Department issued about 100 citations for smoking pot in public.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Ross Reynolds talks with Jenny Durkan, U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Washington, who announced that she will step down at the end of the month. She looks back at her role in Seattle Police Department reform, preventing cyber crime and shaping state marijuana laws.

KUOW Photo/Jamala Henderson

Crime is up in Southeast Seattle, according to Seattle Police say.

At a crime prevention meeting Wednesday night, South Precinct Captain David Proudfoot said their highest priority  is to tackle the rise in street crime.

KUOW/Kara McDermott

When Seattle Police Department officials dug into the data from its first report about marijuana enforcement they found that 80 percent of tickets were issued by one officer.

One apparently very frustrated officer.

In one citation, the officer refers to Washington state's legal pot law as “silly.” He also added at the bottom of the citations, "Attn: Petey Holmes," a snarky reference to Seattle's city attorney, Pete Holmes.

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