Seattle Police Department

Seattle Police patch.
Facebook Photo/Seattle Police Officers Guild

Ross Reynolds talks with Ron Smith, president of the Seattle Police Officers' Guild, about his efforts to balance collaborating with the Seattle Police Department while also representing the interests of the Guild's 1,200 officers and sergeants.

SPD Bust Targets Motel Managers

Apr 1, 2015

Ross Reynolds speaks with Lieutenant Jim Fitzgerald from the Vice and High Risk Victims Unit which carried out a bust on the Orion Motel on Aurora.

The child protection unit in West Midlands, in the U.K.
Flickr Photo/West Midlands Police (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle Police Department Captain Mike Edwards about a legislative proposal to increase funding for investigating and prosecuting child pornography cases. Edwards leads the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force.

This Week's News Calls For New Leadership

Mar 13, 2015
File Photo: Kathleen O'Toole speaks after being introduced by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray as his nominee to be Seattle's new Chief of Police, May 19, 2014.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Is a shakeup of the Seattle Police Department’s top ranks a sign of progress? Should a franchise be considered big business when it comes to Seattle's $15 minimum wage law? And is there hope for Seahawks fans soaked by Super Bowl ticket scammers?

Luke Burbank steps in for KUOW's Bill Radke to make sense of those stories and more of the week's news with Seattle Channel's Joni Balter, Crosscut's Knute Berger and Eli Sanders of The Stranger.

Amazon Vice President Greg Russell wants to help the Seattle Police Department make better use of technology.
Amy Radil

Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O’Toole has announced a long-awaited leadership shakeup, looking outside and within the department for four new assistant chiefs.

File Photo: Kathleen O'Toole speaks after being introduced by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray as his nominee to be Seattle's new Chief of Police, May 19, 2014.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Marcie Sillman speaks with Seattle Times reporter Steve Miletich about Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole's appointment of four new assistant police chiefs.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about the personnel shakeup at the Seattle Police Department. Police Chief Kathleen O' Toole is replacing four assistant police chiefs.

Crowds of homeless people often gather on the sidewalks of downtown Seattle near social-service providers.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Ross Reynolds speaks with Katherine Beckett, co-author with Steven Herbert of the book, "Banished: The New Social Control in Urban America," about her research into interactions between the Seattle Police Department and people experiencing homelessness in downtown Seattle.

Reporter Dominic Holden at his going-away roast after departing The Stranger,  Nov. 1, 2014. Holden submitted a complaint to the SPD after an incident in July 2013.
Joe Mabel

In the summer of 2013, Seattle journalist Dominic Holden, a reporter for The Stranger, filed a complaint with Seattle’s Office of Professional Accountability, saying a police officer tried to harass and intimidate him. The OPA sustained his complaint, saying the officer had broken rules on professional courtesy and deserved a one-day suspension without pay. The case was closed.

Then in February last year, Holden heard indirectly that the officer had appealed the finding. Interim SPD Chief Harry Bailey had reached a settlement with the officer in which the misconduct finding was, in fact, reversed.

Seattle Police guard a building during protests on Dec. 6, 2014, in response to the killings of Michael Brown in Missouri and Eric Garner in New York.
Flickr Photo/Scott Lum (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Lisa Daugaard, policy director for the Public Defender Association and a long-time follower of police reform in Seattle, about how a decades-old city ordinance may hinder Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole's efforts to reform the department.

OPA Director Pierce Murphy moved his offices out of SPD last year to make them more accessible for the public.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Complaints to Seattle’s police oversight office have risen dramatically in the first weeks of 2015. But officials say that’s not necessarily an indication of problems at SPD. It just means word about the organization is getting out.

TRANSCRIPT

If a Seattle resident has a complaint about an interaction with a police officer, they’re supposed to contact the city’s Office of Professional Accountability.

Only a fraction of those public inquiries are ultimately investigated for possible misconduct and officer discipline.

File photo of Seattle Police at Greenwood Parade in 2008.
Flickr Photo/Natalie Wilkie (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Sue Rahr, executive director of the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission, about a  police training program called Blue Courage. Rahr hopes this program will be a step toward changing police culture.

New York Police Department officer Joshua Jones wears a VieVu body camera on his chest during a news conference, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014 in New York.
AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

Ross Reynolds talks with Washington state Sen. Pramila Jayapal about a proposed bill that would place tight restrictions on footage collected by police body cameras. Reynolds also talks with James McMahan, policy director for the Washington Association of Sheriffs & Police Chiefs.

12 seahawks
Flickr Photo/Yuri Levchenko (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seahawks fever is alive and well across the state, with cities taking on nicknames in advance of the new name: Shermmamish, Pete Angeles, Hawkilteo. We could go on… and we will. Also, this week: Why did a Seattle police officer hassle a 69-year-old man over a golf club? Will Washington state abolish the death penalty? Should cyclists have to pay a toll to roll on the new 520 bridge? And why is Bill Gates worried about artificial intelligence?

Bill Radke makes sense of these stories and more with Crosscut's Knute Berger, The Stranger's Eli Sanders and news analyst Joni Balter.

Since his arrest last year, William Wingate, a 70-year-old veteran and retired bus driver, no longer stands up for the Seattle Police Department in conversations with his siblings.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The Seattle Police officer involved in a case involving the arrest of a senior citizen has been reassigned to a job where she has no contact with the public.

The move follows public outcry over a dashboard video showing the arrest of William Wingate, an elderly black man who had been standing on a Capitol Hill corner, leaning on his golf club.

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