Seattle Police Department

Ross Reynolds speaks with Capt. Chris Fowler, commander of the Seattle Police Department's West Precinct, about the Neighborhood Response Team. The group of six officers patrols a nine-block area in downtown Seattle, using a new kind of policing to fight what business owners have called "downtown disorder."

Seattle police have arrested a suspect in a recent gang-related shooting in the New Holly neighborhood.

The arrest is connected to a drive-by shooting two weeks ago that left 20-year old Zakariya Issa dead on the street.

Capitol Hill rainbow crosswalk at 10th Ave & East Pike Street.
Flickr Photo/Gordon Werner (CC BY SA 2.0)

More rainbow crosswalks are coming to the hub of the Seattle gay community on Capitol Hill. That’s just one item in the mayor’s action plan to improve safety for LGBTQ people in the city. 

A view of Lake Union from Seattle Harbor Patrol 2. Drownings often occur on sunny days and because of drunk boating.
KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Seattle Police Officer Mark Mulvanny remembers a time about 10 years ago when he spotted a drunk boater.

He was patrolling Lake Union when he saw the boat speeding northbound, heading straight for him.

Christopher Monfort is escorted into the courtroom on the first day of his trial for murdering SPD Officer Timothy Brenton, along with other charges, on Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Christopher Monfort should spend the rest of his life in prison without parole for the ambush slaying of a Seattle police officer, a King County Superior Court jury decided Thursday.

Guards wheel Monfort from the courtroom on Wednesday. Monfort is paralyzed from the waist down.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Closing arguments continue Thursday in the penalty phase of the trial of Christopher Monfort. Monfort ambushed two Seattle police officers in 2009, killing one of them. 

The state wants to see Monfort executed. The defense hopes Monfort gets life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Seattle's proposed ban would apply to people lighting up tobacco products. Washington state law prohibits marijuana smoking in public places.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole says the police department could use help from city lawmakers about how the city should handle tickets for public marijuana use.

It's against state law to consume marijuana in public. And current policy requires officers to respond to complaints when people break that law.

Lauris Bitners, a North Capitol Hill resident who had a sign stolen from in front of his house,  is fighting back using a GoPro camera.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle’s primary election is just weeks away, and campaign signs are sprouting in people’s yards. With so much at stake in this election, you can bet some of those yard signs will get stolen.

That’s what happened to Lauris Bitners. He lives in a fancy neighborhood on North Capitol Hill. It’s not exactly ground zero for the debate on rent control. Bitners jokingly describes his neighborhood as “a bastion of white affluence.”

Neighbors, police and pastors gather at a vigil for Torrence Spillers.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Members of Seattle's black clergy mourned the recent shooting death of a black man in his 30s in Seattle's Central Area. The man, identified by those at the vigil as Torrence Spillers, was killed on Thursday afternoon. 

Andrea Sigler Castro, one of Spillers' teachers, spoke at the vigil. She said Spillers struggled.

Marcie Sillman talks with Jeremy Bradford, an early participant in Seattle's Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion Program, about his journey from a homeless addict to a small business owner.

Joshua Curtis stands behind a foosball table.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Westlake Park in downtown Seattle has a lot going on. Besides the café tables, the foosball tables and the park rangers, you’ll find free classes almost every day. On Monday at 10 a.m., kids will be building stomp rockets out of paper. Tuesday evening there’s a Yoga class.

But the park is better known for drug dealing than downward dog.

The new activity is part of the city’s efforts to bring more people into downtown public spaces to reclaim them for everybody.

Officer Michelle Vallor and community leader Vung It.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Seattle police officers don’t get involved in immigration issues as a rule – but that doesn’t mean their relationship with refugees is easy.

The city wants to change that by bringing together officers and people who often avoid them – like Officer Michelle Vallor and 19-year-old Vung It.

Kimberly Rodriguez, a new recruit for the Seattle Police Department, on her first day at the police academy. That class of 30 recruits included eight women, which was unusual. Most classes have between one and five female recruits.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

The Seattle Police Department’s initiative to put body cameras on all its officers isn’t a simple matter of just buying some hardware and software.

First, says Mike Wagers, the department’s chief operating officer, that’s about 650 cameras. And those cameras will be generating terabytes of video, he told KUOW’s Marcie Sillman.

The Seattle Police Department's "Safe Place" decal.
Seattle Police

David Hyde speaks with officer Jim Ritter, LGBTQ Liaison for the Seattle Police Department, about the new Safe Place program which aims to keep the city's LGBTQ community safe from harassment and violence. 

Lee Townsend with the Metroplitan Improvement District checks his "hotspots" in Belltown for litter...and worse.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Over the past year, street sweepers in downtown Seattle saw a dramatic increase in the number of syringes on the ground. But those numbers have declined since March. They’re a data point in the larger debate over policing and drug use downtown.

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