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Seattle Police Department

Seattle police officers observe marchers moving down 4th Avenue during the Black Lives Matter rally in Seattle on Saturday.
KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

The Seattle Police Department says bias and hate crime reporting continues to rise in Seattle.


A photo of Charleena Lyles stands in memorial.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

A wrongful death lawsuit was filed Friday against the two Seattle police officers who shot Charleena Lyles.

Candles surround a photograph of Charleena Lyles after a vigil was held at Solid Ground Brettler Family Place on Tuesday, June 19, 2017, in Seattle, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seven bullets riddled Charleena Lyles’ body earlier this summer when she was shot by Seattle police.

Those bullets struck her chest and arm and dug into into her hip, back and side.

And her uterus, blowing through a four-month old fetus.

It would have been a boy.

Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Two Seattle police officers who shot and killed Che Taylor, an African-American man, last year are suing City Councilmember Kshama Sawant for defamation.

Protesters sprayed Seattle Police with silly string moments before attempting to break the line. Seattle, August 13, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

A day after violent clashes between white nationalists and counter-protesters in Virginia, tensions were high during two opposing protests in Seattle.


Charleena Lyles' father, Charles Lyles, with his wife and attorneys
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

The family of Charleena Lyles has filed a legal claim against the city of Seattle. Lyles, an African American mother of four, was fatally shot by police in June.

This claim is the first step toward bringing a civil rights wrongful death lawsuit against the city and the Seattle Police Department.

Bill Radke speaks with Shankar Narayan, technology and liberty director of the ACLU, and Ron Hosko, president of the Law Enforcement Legal Defense Fund, about sureveillance by Seattle Police.

A new City Council ordinance requires greater oversight from the public over what kind of technology used for surveillance can be used by law enforcement.

Narayan believes this is a great first step in creating more public trust and providing people with more privacy, though he would like to see it go even further. Hosko believes that this kind of public scrutiny weakens a police force's ability to strategize and less access to tech may strain resources.

In this March 12, 2015, file photo, Seattle police officer Debra Pelich, right, wears a video camera on her eyeglasses as she talks with Alex Legesse before a small community gathering in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File

Seattle's police union leaders have filed a complaint against Mayor Ed Murray's body camera mandate. Murray issued an executive order this month to require all officers to wear body cameras while on duty.

Seattle Police Officer Louis Chan, center, talks with a man in Ballard about his erratic and threatening behavior. Chan is partnered with a social worker to help deescalate volatile situations.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

When it comes to policing, there’s a lot of history in the race for Seattle mayor.

Two of the candidates, Jenny Durkan and Mike McGinn, have faced off before. They negotiated the city’s consent decree between the Justice Department and the city of Seattle.

Seattle Police Department patch.
Facebook Photo/Seattle Police Officers Guild

Bill Radke talks to Seattle City Councilmember Tim Burgess and president of the Seattle Police Union Kevin Stuckey about how contract negotiations are affecting the progress of police reform. The union claims that they are being steamrolled while the city contends the union is being selfish.  

In this March 12, 2015, file photo, Seattle police officer Debra Pelich, right, wears a video camera on her eyeglasses as she talks with Alex Legesse before a small community gathering in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray has signed an executive order to require officers and sergeants to wear body cameras while on duty. The software has already been piloted in several Seattle neighborhoods.

But Seattle's police officer's union says the full rollout is too soon, because labor negotiations are still underway.


A march protesting the Seattle police shooting of Che Taylor on Feb. 21, 2016 moves through downtown Seattle on Feb. 25, 2016.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Seattle is a step closer to getting a law that prohibits biased policing.

The proposed legislation would take the Seattle Police Department's bias-free policing policies and incorporate them into city law.

Mourners at the internment of Charleena Lyles at Hillcrest Cemetery in Kent, Washington, on Monday, July 10, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Charleena Lyles was buried Monday.

Lyles’ friends and family filled the New Hope Missionary Baptist Church in Seattle’s Central District for her funeral, many wearing purple, her favorite color.


KUOW Photo/ Megan Farmer

In February of 2016 Andre Taylor was in L.A. when he got a phone call from his stepmom in Seattle.

She told him his little brother Che Taylor had been shot by the police. Che Taylor was standing next to the open door of a car. The two officers said he was reaching for a gun when they fired.

Dianne and Michael Murphy, parents of Miles Murphy who was shot by Seattle Police in 2009, were dismayed by the King County inquest process.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

For Michael and Dianne Murphy of Maple Valley, the inquest examining their son’s death left them completely disillusioned. “It was a joke,” Michael said.


File Photo: Kathleen O'Toole speaks after being introduced by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray as his nominee to be Seattle's new Chief of Police, May 19, 2014.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Show up.

That was the gist of an email from Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant to the police chief. A public forum was set for Tuesday on the shooting of Charleena Lyles.

Charleena Lyles' father, Charles, speaks to the crowd at the UW's Kane Hall as City Council members watch on Tuesday, June 27. 'She died on Father's Day. Every Father's Day I'll think of that,' he said.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

"We elected you. And you're going to do something this time."

That was one message to City Council members Tuesday night at a public forum on the shooting of Charleena Lyles.


The late Michael Taylor
Larry Taylor

You know about Charleena Lyles, the mom of four who was shot by Seattle police a week ago.

Last fall, a similar shooting happened the day when the Jungle, a homeless camp, was shut down. Police shot a man named Michael Taylor.


Twin sisters Makalah, 12, left, and Akalah, right, sit on the steps at the Solid Ground Brettler Family Place, on Monday.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

In the minutes after Charleena Lyles was shot by police, a 12-year-old girl slipped by police officers and ran up four flights of stairs.

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Ijeoma Oluo, editor at large of The Establishment, and Eula Scott Bynoe, co-host of HellaBlackHellaSeattle, about the conversations they've been having in the wake of the shooting of Charleena Lyles. 

What can prevent tragedies like Charleena Lyles?

Jun 21, 2017

Bill Radke talks with former Seattle Police Chief Norm Stamper and state Representative Morgan Irwin, also a Seattle police officer, about the shooting of Charleena Lyles by Seattle police and what, if anything, could have been done to prevent it.

Irwin says the officers followed proper protocol during a tragic, isolated incident. Stamper says it points to larger problems of implicit bias and how police perceive danger on the job. 

Brettler Family Place, part of the complex at Sand Point Housing
Solid Ground

Charleena Lyles lived in housing owned and operated by Solid Ground in Seattle's Magnuson Park. The nonprofit organization manages a campus with 175 housing units for people who have come through the experience of being homeless. Mike Buchman is the communications director at Solid Ground. He told Kim Malcolm that a neighborhood has been created at Sand Point for hundreds of people. 

A large crowd marches on Montlake Blvd. after a vigil honoring Charleena Lyles was held at Solid Ground Brettler Family Place on Tuesday, June 19, 2017, in Seattle, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Hundreds of people gathered in Seattle’s Magnuson Park Tuesday night to remember Charleena Lyles, the 30-year-old black woman who was fatally shot by Seattle police on Sunday.

Tiffany Rogers, a sister of Charleena Lyles, speaks during a vigil on Tuesday, June 19, 2017, at Solid Ground Brettler Family Place, in Seattle, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke speaks with Patricia Murphy about the latest updates on the fatal Seattle police shooting of Charleena Lyles Sunday morning. 

A state senator from Seattle is renewing his call to rewrite Washington’s police deadly force law. Democrat David Frockt represents the legislative district where Seattle police shot and killed Charleena Lyles, a pregnant mother of four on Sunday.

Jenny Henderson, Seattle mental health counselor
KUOW: Kara McDermott

The African American community in Seattle is in shock after city police shot and killed 30-year-old Charleena Lyles. Jenny Henderson is a therapist in Seattle whose clientele is mostly black. She tells Kim Malcolm that Lyles' mental illness was not taken into account. 

Candles surround a photograph of Charleena Lyles after a vigil was held at Solid Ground Brettler Family Place on Tuesday, June 19, 2017, in Seattle, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Reporter Patricia Murphy talks to Bill Radke about the fatal police shooting of 30-year-old Charleena Lyles that happened in her apartment near Magnuson Park Sunday morning. 

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle police officers are heard on an audio tape yelling “Get back! Get back!” before firing a volley of shots that killed a woman who had called in a burglary.

Charleena Lyles was shot Sunday morning. Police said she brandished a knife. But family members say police knew Lyles had mental health issues.

Dozens gathered Sunday evening, June 18, 2017, for a vigil held for Charleena Lyles, who was shot to death by Seattle police.
KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Dozens of people gathered at a vigil last night for Charleena Lyles, a mother of four who was shot by Seattle Police Sunday morning.

The shooting occurred in a Solid Ground housing complex for formerly homeless families in the Sand Point neighborhood shortly after 10 a.m.

Seattle Police Officer Louis Chan, center, talks with a man in Ballard about his erratic and threatening behavior. Chan is partnered with a social worker to help deescalate volatile situations.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

If people want to take pictures or video of police making an arrest they have the legal authority to do so in Seattle. The Seattle City Council passed a so-called "Public Safety Bill of Rights" on Monday.

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