Seattle City Council

In Seattle, Scoffing At The Word 'Scofflaw'

Aug 5, 2014
The Boston Globe archives

Sometimes the words we use cause offense we never intended. That’s what happened on Monday at a Seattle City Council meeting, when one word derailed a bill officials say could bring in $21 million in unpaid fines.   

The word: scofflaw.

Flickr Photo/Andrew Smith (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seattle City Councilmember Mike O’Brien is looking for affordable housing solutions – for a population that may be overlooked.

Speaking with KUOW’s Ross Reynolds, O’Brien said that systems are in place for those making around 30 percent of the area median wage, but not for those between 60 to 100 percent of the median (for a single person that’s between $37,000 and $50,000 a year).

Ann Dornfeld / KUOW

Patti Oliver Bailey sat on a sunny wooden deck in Seattle’s Rainier Valley on a recent afternoon, surrounded by toddlers digging through a box of pink sand and bright toys.

Amy Radil

On June 16, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray announced that a stakeholders group had agreed to lift restrictions on the growth of rideshare companies. In exchange, companies like Lyft and Uber would meet the same safety and insurance requirements as taxi drivers.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

In the wake of recent gun violence, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray said the city faces a crisis of confidence in public safety.

Flickr Photo/a.pasquier

The Seattle City Council voted on Monday to send two competing early childhood education initiatives to voters this fall. One initiative was proposed by council President Tim Burgess and Mayor Ed Murray, and the other by a union that represents child care workers.

Flickr Photo/urbanists (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray has announced a new way forward for car services.

Murray said a new agreement has been reached that does not cap the number of people who drive for Uber X, Lyft and other similar rideshare companies.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Last week, Seattle became the first city in the nation to establish a $15 minimum wage for all workers. The framework was established by a panel of business, labor and community leaders, which the City Council passed in record time.

In researching the Seattle City Charter, KUOW reporter Deborah Wang found the lyrics of the Seattle city song.

Courtesy Jillian Smith

A shooting on the campus of Seattle Pacific University on Thursday left one person dead and two others seriously injured. Seattle made history this week as the first city in the country to establish a $15 minimum wage for all workers. And the controversy surrounding Amazon's business practices continued to attract national media attention.

Steve Scher recaps those stories and more news of the week with Crosscut's Knute Berger, The Stranger's Eli Sanders, news analyst Joni Balter and Live Wire's Luke Burbank.

Week In Review Extra

President Obama this week announced new rules that would lead to a reduction in carbon emissions from U.S. power plants. He proposed new Environmental Protection Agency rules to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 30 percent by 2030. Is America up to the challenge?

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle Police Chief nominee Kathleen O’Toole met with the City Council Public Safety Committee on Wednesday. It was one of several question and answer sessions O’Toole will attend as part of her confirmation process.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

David Hyde gets the scoop from KUOW's Deborah Wang about what happened at the city council meeting Monday night when a historical $15 minimum wage was unanimously passed.

Then, Marcie Sillman speaks with Steve Caldiera, president and CEO of the International Franchise Association, about his plans to sue Seattle to overturn the minimum wage ordinance.

Last, David Hyde talks with the advocacy group 15 Now about whether they will move forward with their own ballot measure to raise the city's minimum wage faster.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

In a unanimous vote, to a standing ovation, the Seattle City Council approved a bill to increase the city’s minimum wage to $15 an hour.

The crowd cheered “We made 15 possible!” after the reading of the vote tally in a meeting marked with passionate pleas for its passage from the public as well as council members.

Failed Amendments

The packed crowd of vocal proponents for the passage of the bill, many of whom gave their personal stories during the section of public comment, booed the failure of four amendments to the City Council’s plan.

From DESC's Facebook page.

David Hyde talks with Bill Hobson, executive director of Downtown Emergency Service Center, about how his organization would implement the $15 minimum wage and why he's advocating that the city help.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Over a hundred members of the Seattle Police Department have filed a lawsuit against the federally-mandated reforms SPD has adopted. The Seattle City Council has come to an agreement on the minimum wage proposal.

Steve Scher recaps those stories and more news of the week with Crosscut's Knute Berger, The Stranger's Eli Sanders, news analyst Joni Balter and LiveWire host Luke Burbank.

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