Seattle | KUOW News and Information

Seattle

Caitlin Lee raises a Tax Amazon sign in front of Seattle City Council members on Monday, May 14, 2018, during a head tax vote at City Hall in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks about what the compromise head tax means for Seattle with KUOW reporter Carolyn Adolph. We also talk to Todd Biesold, owner and CFO of Merlino Foods, about how the head tax will affect his business.

Volunteers count the number of people experiencing homelessness during the annual King County Point-In-Time count on Friday, January 25, 2018, in Pioneer Square.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Is Seattle the sort of place where, if you can’t afford it, there’s no room for you?


The newly constructed Arbora Court Apartments, with 133 units, is shown on Monday, April 23, 2018, in Seattle. Forty of the apartments have been set aside for families transitioning out of homelessness.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Three years ago, the city told developers: You can either pay into a fund or build affordable housing units yourselves.

Listener Andrew Chinnici heard about that on KUOW and wanted to know: How is it working out?

Well, Andrew, so far there are permits for just 19 units through this fund.

Edouardo Jordan, right, works in the kitchen at JuneBaby on Wednesday December 6, 2017, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle Chef Edouardo Jordan kept one item off his menu when he opened Salare in 2015.

“I didn’t want to put fried chicken on the menu,” Jordan said in the Netflix documentary series, “Ugly Delicious.”

Elmer Dixon, left, laughs with Ben Abe, right, the current owner of the space where the Seattle Black Panther Party had their first office, while reminiscing about the location, on Wednesday, January 10, 2018, on 34th Avenue in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Madrona is a posh Seattle neighborhood with million-dollar homes. But 50 years ago, at the playground here, it was where hundreds of Black Panthers trained.

 


Saying they want to keep up the pressure on elected officials to pass new gun control measures, Seattle-area students joined a national school walkout on the 19th anniversary of the shooting at Columbine High School.

But they said Friday’s gathering was intended to shine a light on gun violence in the U.S. beyond shootings on school grounds. 

KUOW PHOTO / CASEY MARTIN

Lovable losers? Newbies with something to prove? A town on the cusp of reclaiming its glory?

Seattle sports fans, it's time to talk about who we are.

Let's dig into the city’s sports identity with panelists Michael-Shawn Dugar, Kate Preusser, and Geoff Baker. They cover everything from the new rugby team, impassioned Sounders fans and athletes reflecting fans' values.


Seattle lost a civil rights icon this weekend.

The Reverend Dr. Samuel B. McKinney died Saturday. He was 91. 

KUOW's Marcie Sillman spoke with arts advocate and former Seattle Arts Commission chair, Vivian Phillips, who knew McKinney personally about his life and work. 

On Sunday, April 8, 2018, 7,000 cyclists braved wind and rain to get the last ride across the viaduct.
KUOW Photo/Casey Martin

If you were driving through Seattle Sunday you may have noticed the Alaskan Way Viaduct was closed all morning.

Well, closed to cars that is. The bridge was open to bikes.


The Seattle School Board has announced the three finalists in the running to be the next Superintendent: Denise Juneau; Andre Spencer and Jeanice Swift.

There’s a line in “Where’d You Go, Bernadette,” by Maria Semple, that triggers pained recognition among locals.

“The drivers here are horrible,” she begins. “They’re the slowest drivers you ever saw.”

FLICKR PHOTO/Nathan Winder/https://flic.kr/p/bqTzXf

New protections may be on the way for Seattleites who can no longer afford rent.

Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant says she'll introduce a bill in the next few months that would require landlords to pay for relocation expenses if rent goes up by more than 10 percent.


The Granite Curling Club in Seattle's Bitter Lake neighborhood.
KUOW Photo/Casey Martin

The Winter Olympics are over — but there's good news for curling fans. You don't have to wait four years to enjoy more thrilling curling action.

The Granite Curling Club in Seattle's Bitter Lake neighborhood hosts league play and will teach you how to throw stones, sweep and score like the pros.  


Seattle skyline
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Ross Reynolds talks to Zaki Hamid, a program director for Humanities Washington, about why he calls Seattle home and what has kept him here. And we  take calls from listeners who share their stories of how they make it work in the changing region. 

KUOW photo/Kate Walters

Vera Page’s office is her car, a Chevrolet HHR. Her two phones chime and chirp as she sits parked in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood. Many of the calls she receives every day are from families in crisis, looking to Page for help.


Adra Boo and Jen Petersen talk about leaving and staying in Seattle
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks with Jen Petersen and Adra Boo about their respective decisions to leave Seattle (and the United States) and stay in the Puget Sound region. They reflect on what's changed and what hasn't and whether Seattle is living up to its progressive ideals. 

Allison Adams is shown through a foggy window as she works on her laptop at Storyville Coffee on Tuesday, November 21, 2017, on 1st Ave., in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

A warm front has brought lots and lots of rain to Seattle and surrounding areas this week. The weather is expected to continue through the weekend. Photographer Megan Farmer captured these shots around the Rainy City. 

The sunset is shown from a suspended scaffolding below the new rotating restaurant in the Space Needle on Monday, November 6, 2017, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Construction on the first phase of the Space Needle's Century Project will be complete in May of 2018. When the project is done, the 55-year-old landmark will feature the first ever rotating restaurant with a glass floor.

“It’ll just be you and the view,” said Karen Olson, chief marketing officer for the Space Needle. 

Flickr Photo/Aaron Brethorst (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/wZ2bfe

Here in Seattle, we're innovators in tech, business, medicine, music and art. KUOW is exploring why Seattle is a magnet for people with big dreams. At a recent Seattle Public Library event called Invent Together, we asked people why Seattle is a hub for innovation. 

A pro-Trump rally attendee listens to an organizer speak at Westlake Plaza in downtown Seattle on Monday, May 1, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

On Wednesday we aired an interview with a man who wore a Nazi armband in Seattle. According to people observing him on the bus and then downtown, this man harassed black people — by yelling and throwing bananas at them. 


Growth makes driving Seattle streets crazy - in front of schools, on narrow streets in old neighborhoods, and 59th St. and 22nd Ave NW  where this crazy thing went down. Our audience's question, by a landslide: where are the stop signs to restore order?
KUOW/Megan Farmer

As traffic has worsened in the Seattle area, drivers have taken to side streets to beat the brake lights.

This prompted one of our most popular Local Wonder questions: Why doesn’t Seattle have more stop signs?


KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The rising cost of housing in America's most desirable "creative" cities troubles Richard Florida, urbanist thinker and author. In those cities, the cost of housing is affordable only to the creative class themselves. The rest of the working population — those in service industry or manufacturing — struggle to keep up with rising housing prices.

Florida says what's happening in Seattle, specifically, is surprising even to someone like him, "supposedly in the know."

Carl Slater at the Good Shepherd Center in Wallingford
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle’s Wallingford neighborhood is known for its restored bungalows and for Gasworks Park. But some people worry it could lose its soul if the city’s affordable housing plan goes through. 


Aaliyah Konick, a senior at Nova, poses for a portrait on Thursday, September 7, 2017, outside of Nova high school in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

“Punk isn’t dead,” said Mariam Elbortoukaly, a sophomore at The Nova Project, an alternative Seattle high school in the Central District.

See that car in the middle lane zipping to the front of the line? You hate that driver, but they're actually doing the right thing, known as the zipper merge.
WSDOT

Three years ago, we ran a story about a little-known traffic tip known as the "zipper merge." 

In short: Drivers should use all lanes leading up to a merge point, rather than clog up one lane. Arrived at the front of the line, drivers in all lanes take turns merging. This is not cheating! (See image above for why the seemingly polite way gunks up traffic.) 

An Amazon Prime truck delivers an Australian fern to Amazon’s campus for the ceremonial first planting at The Spheres on Thursday,  May 4, 2017, in Seattle.
Stephen Brashear/AP Images for Amazon

Bill Radke speaks with Geekwire editor Todd Bishop and Slate Magazine tech writer April Glaser about what it could mean for Seattle that Amazon will set up a second headquarters in a different North American city. 

Are Seattle drivers really so terrible?

Sep 6, 2017
If we're terrible drivers, so is everyone else, because there's little difference between driver behavior across regions.
Flickr Photo/Susan Murtaugh (CC BY-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/7rdUUW

If there’s one thing Seattleites want to know, it’s this: Why is everyone else such a terrible driver?

The inside of the elevators at Amazon headquarters in Seattle.
Flickr File Photo/cheukiecfu CC BY-NC-ND: http://bit.ly/1MUXs0y

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times report Mike Rosenberg about his article that shows how Seattle has become a company town for Amazon.

Crosscut Columnist Knute Berger also joins the conversation to talk about how he has seen this same pattern with Boeing and Microsoft before.

We also hear from listener on how this change has impacted them.

KUOW PHOTO/Megan Farmer

The mayoral race in Seattle is heating up. King County Democrats have endorsed Cary Moon, and so has today’s panelist, former mayor Mike McGinn. Labor unions have come out in support Jenny Durkan. What’s the significance of this latest round of endorsements?

The City of Seattle is going to spend at least a quarter of million dollars defending legal attacks against the high earner income tax passed by City Council on a 9-0 vote. Is it common for a local or state government agency to pass laws they know they need to spend money to defend in court?

Is Seattle becoming Amazonia? And because we're still not sick of talking about the eclipse, we ask the panel where they watched the celestial show.

Listen to the show on Fridays at noon and join the conversation on Twitter using #KUOWwir.

A sketch of The Emerald, a 40-foot condominium tower planned at 2nd and Stewart near Pike Place Market in downtown Seattle. Chinese investors helped make the project possible.
Hewitt Seattle

Seattleites love to blame outsiders for skyrocketing housing prices.

Pages