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Seattle

Seattle’s first black cop meets a killer over checkers

Jul 12, 2018
Horace Cayton was the first black deputy in Seattle.
KUOW Illustration/Teo Popescu

Horace Cayton was an African-American sociologist born in Seattle in 1903. His father was born a slave; his mother was the daughter of the first black U.S. Congressman. This is an excerpt from his autobiography, The Long Old Road, published in 1963.

A walk in Seattle with my father, who was born a slave

Jul 12, 2018
Horace Cayton Jr., the author of Long Old Road, as an adult.
Library of Congress

Horace Cayton was an African-American sociologist born in Seattle in 1903. His father was born a slave; his mother was the daughter of the first black U.S. Congressman. This is an excerpt from his autobiography, The Long Old Road, published in 1963.

Horace Cayton Jr., center, as an adult. Cayton worked many jobs before becoming an esteemed sociologist in Chicago — longshoreman and Seattle's first black deputy, among others.
Library of Congress

Horace Cayton was an African-American sociologist born in Seattle in 1903. His father was born a slave; his mother was the daughter of the first black U.S. Congressman. This is an excerpt from his autobiography, "The Long Old Road", published in 1963.

The Seattle dog, with grilled onions and cream cheese, was born in Pioneer Square in the late 1980s. This is a Polaroid of that era.
Courtesy of Hadley Long

Mara Dillinger stood at a hot dog cart in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood, eating her fourth hot dog of the night.

Flickr Photo/Howard Ignatius (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/nZ4Mz1

In honor of the summer solstice, we asked listeners about their favorite summer songs. You came through with the nostalgic, the playful, and some truly excellent 80s throwbacks. 


Seattle has three times the number of households in the top 1 percent as the national average according to Mark Long, a professor in the Evans School at the University of Washington
KUOW Graphic/Teodora Popescu

Seattle got richer in the last decade. You know that.

But how many of those in the top 1 percent income bracket live here?

KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

The next time you walk by Third Avenue and James Street in downtown Seattle, you might notice a cluster of bronze leaves on the street.

They bear the names of some of the homeless people who have died over the last 15 years.


KUOW PHOTO / CASEY MARTIN

An American flag for every grave marker in Seattle's Evergreen Washelli Veterans Memorial Cemetery. 

That was the mission for dozens of volunteers at 7 o'clock Monday morning. 

Veterans, scouting troops, and family of service members scooped up their flags and started walking the rows, planting one U.S. flag for each white marble gravestone. 

Over 5000 times, in all.


KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle is a growing city. Roads have gotten more congested, trails more crowded and housing prices have been on a steady climb up.  So what brings people into the city, and once they are here, why do they stay? 

Homeless families outside a shelter in downtown Seattle
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Seattle made some big shifts in its approach to homeless services last year, including signing new contracts that gave the city the ability to ding service providers that don’t get enough people into permanent housing.

For the first time in more than a decade, the city competitively bid roughly $34 million in service contracts, which included “pay for performance” measures.

Now the city has softened on this policy. Providers who don’t meet the standards in the first quarter of this year will get a pass. 

Marco Collins, Bill Radke and Karen Mason-Blair at KUOW
KUOW Photo/Brie Ripley

Pearl Jam is coming to Safeco Field this summer. Ichiro is back with the Mariners. Sea-Tac Airport plays a message from Sir Mix-A-Lot. Is it fair to say that Seattle can't get over the 90s? We look at a Seattle Met article that asks, "Why can't Seattle quit the '90s?" Who are the city's cultural icons of today?

Bill Radke asks Seattle DJ Marco Collins and grunge photographer Karen Mason Blair. Also restaurateur Tom Douglas joins us to weigh in on his position as an icon of the 1990s.

Caitlin Lee raises a Tax Amazon sign in front of Seattle City Council members on Monday, May 14, 2018, during a head tax vote at City Hall in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks about what the compromise head tax means for Seattle with KUOW reporter Carolyn Adolph. We also talk to Todd Biesold, owner and CFO of Merlino Foods, about how the head tax will affect his business.

Volunteers count the number of people experiencing homelessness during the annual King County Point-In-Time count on Friday, January 25, 2018, in Pioneer Square.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Is Seattle the sort of place where, if you can’t afford it, there’s no room for you?


The newly constructed Arbora Court Apartments, with 133 units, is shown on Monday, April 23, 2018, in Seattle. Forty of the apartments have been set aside for families transitioning out of homelessness.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Three years ago, the city told developers: You can either pay into a fund or build affordable housing units yourselves.

Listener Andrew Chinnici heard about that on KUOW and wanted to know: How is it working out?

Well, Andrew, so far there are permits for just 19 units through this fund.

Edouardo Jordan, right, works in the kitchen at JuneBaby on Wednesday December 6, 2017, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle Chef Edouardo Jordan kept one item off his menu when he opened Salare in 2015.

“I didn’t want to put fried chicken on the menu,” Jordan said in the Netflix documentary series, “Ugly Delicious.”

Elmer Dixon, left, laughs with Ben Abe, right, the current owner of the space where the Seattle Black Panther Party had their first office, while reminiscing about the location, on Wednesday, January 10, 2018, on 34th Avenue in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Madrona is a posh Seattle neighborhood with million-dollar homes. But 50 years ago, at the playground here, it was where hundreds of Black Panthers trained.

 


Saying they want to keep up the pressure on elected officials to pass new gun control measures, Seattle-area students joined a national school walkout on the 19th anniversary of the shooting at Columbine High School.

But they said Friday’s gathering was intended to shine a light on gun violence in the U.S. beyond shootings on school grounds. 

KUOW PHOTO / CASEY MARTIN

Lovable losers? Newbies with something to prove? A town on the cusp of reclaiming its glory?

Seattle sports fans, it's time to talk about who we are.

Let's dig into the city’s sports identity with panelists Michael-Shawn Dugar, Kate Preusser, and Geoff Baker. They cover everything from the new rugby team, impassioned Sounders fans and athletes reflecting fans' values.


Seattle lost a civil rights icon this weekend.

The Reverend Dr. Samuel B. McKinney died Saturday. He was 91. 

KUOW's Marcie Sillman spoke with arts advocate and former Seattle Arts Commission chair, Vivian Phillips, who knew McKinney personally about his life and work. 

On Sunday, April 8, 2018, 7,000 cyclists braved wind and rain to get the last ride across the viaduct.
KUOW Photo/Casey Martin

If you were driving through Seattle Sunday you may have noticed the Alaskan Way Viaduct was closed all morning.

Well, closed to cars that is. The bridge was open to bikes.


The Seattle School Board has announced the three finalists in the running to be the next Superintendent: Denise Juneau; Andre Spencer and Jeanice Swift.

There’s a line in “Where’d You Go, Bernadette,” by Maria Semple, that triggers pained recognition among locals.

“The drivers here are horrible,” she begins. “They’re the slowest drivers you ever saw.”

FLICKR PHOTO/Nathan Winder/https://flic.kr/p/bqTzXf

New protections may be on the way for Seattleites who can no longer afford rent.

Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant says she'll introduce a bill in the next few months that would require landlords to pay for relocation expenses if rent goes up by more than 10 percent.


The Granite Curling Club in Seattle's Bitter Lake neighborhood.
KUOW Photo/Casey Martin

The Winter Olympics are over — but there's good news for curling fans. You don't have to wait four years to enjoy more thrilling curling action.

The Granite Curling Club in Seattle's Bitter Lake neighborhood hosts league play and will teach you how to throw stones, sweep and score like the pros.  


Seattle skyline
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Ross Reynolds talks to Zaki Hamid, a program director for Humanities Washington, about why he calls Seattle home and what has kept him here. And we  take calls from listeners who share their stories of how they make it work in the changing region. 

KUOW photo/Kate Walters

Vera Page’s office is her car, a Chevrolet HHR. Her two phones chime and chirp as she sits parked in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood. Many of the calls she receives every day are from families in crisis, looking to Page for help.


Adra Boo and Jen Petersen talk about leaving and staying in Seattle
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks with Jen Petersen and Adra Boo about their respective decisions to leave Seattle (and the United States) and stay in the Puget Sound region. They reflect on what's changed and what hasn't and whether Seattle is living up to its progressive ideals. 

Allison Adams is shown through a foggy window as she works on her laptop at Storyville Coffee on Tuesday, November 21, 2017, on 1st Ave., in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

A warm front has brought lots and lots of rain to Seattle and surrounding areas this week. The weather is expected to continue through the weekend. Photographer Megan Farmer captured these shots around the Rainy City. 

The sunset is shown from a suspended scaffolding below the new rotating restaurant in the Space Needle on Monday, November 6, 2017, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Construction on the first phase of the Space Needle's Century Project will be complete in May of 2018. When the project is done, the 55-year-old landmark will feature the first ever rotating restaurant with a glass floor.

“It’ll just be you and the view,” said Karen Olson, chief marketing officer for the Space Needle. 

Flickr Photo/Aaron Brethorst (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/wZ2bfe

Here in Seattle, we're innovators in tech, business, medicine, music and art. KUOW is exploring why Seattle is a magnet for people with big dreams. At a recent Seattle Public Library event called Invent Together, we asked people why Seattle is a hub for innovation. 

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