seafood

This photo at the Nordic Heritage Museum exhibit shows Ivar Haglund 'surrounded by acres of clams,' a reference to his resaturant theme song.
Courtesy of Ivar’s

Think of a simpler Seattle in 1938: No Jeff Bezos, no Bill Gates, no dawn to dusk traffic jams. Instead there was Ivar Haglund, restaurateur and showman with a penchant for the preposterous.

Knute Berger told KUOW’s David Hyde that a new exhibit at the Nordic Heritage Museum tells Ivar’s story. It’s “part of that Northwest sensibility that leads you to grunge, leads you to … who wants to be New York? You know, we came here for other reasons,” Berger said. “And he really got that.”

Sea urchins are considered a culinary delicacy in many parts of the world, including Japan and the United States. The market for this "foie gras of the sea" is growing rapidly — so fast that supply can't keep up with demand.

But a scientist in Birmingham, Ala., says he's found a solution: He's built a sea urchin farm in his lab and has even developed a food for them to make them taste better. Now, he wants to take his tasty urchins out of his farm and into restaurants across the country.

The Business Of Toxic Fish

Apr 1, 2013
Flickr Photo/Steve Snodgrass

For almost 20 years Washington's Department of Ecology has known that the state's water pollution limits have meant some Washingtonians regularly consume dangerous amounts of toxic chemicals in seafood from local waterways.

The Environmental Protection Agency has urged the state to fix the problem. The Department of Ecology was close last year when Boeing and other business interests began lobbying against the changes. Robert McClure from Investigate West uncovered the story through interviews and government document requests and he gives an update to Ross Reynolds.

Flickr/Oceiana

Seattle and Portland are among the best cities to dine on seafood if you want the salmon, sole or halibut you order to actually be salmon, sole or halibut. The two Northwest cities emerged from a national report Thursday with some of the lowest rates of “fish fraud” in the country.

According to the research project by the marine conservation group, Oceana, 33 percent of the 1,215 samples of fish it had analyzed were not actually the fish that they were labeled as by the sushi bars, restaurants and retail outlets selling them.