science

A 26-part series on genetically modified food was not Nathanael Johnson's idea. And he didn't realize it would take six months, either.

Last year, Johnson was hired as the new food writer for Grist, a website for environmental news and opinion. Grist's editor, Scott Rosenberg, was waiting with an assignment: Dig into the controversy over GMOs.

Big, fierce animals — lions and tigers and bears, for example — are relatively scarce in nature. That's normal, because if you have too many, they'll eat themselves out of prey.

But top predators are now so rare that many are in danger of disappearing. That's creating ripple effects throughout the natural world that scientists are still trying to figure out.

What they're exploring is ecology — the interplay of animals and plants in nature. It's not rocket science. It's harder.

A new cable reality show features rugged Northwesterners tromping through the region’s beautiful landscapes. They’re searching for a Northwest icon -- Sasquatch.

Ross Reynolds talks with double-RFID implantee and self-described DIY biohacker Amal Graafstra who runs a business called Dangerous Things that helps people implant RFID chips into their body to open doors, start motorcycles and log onto computers. 

University of Oregon

For years, museum conservators and paleontologists have yearned for a way to duplicate fragile fossils without damaging them. Now scientists with the University of Oregon say they have found a way to do just that, with the help of a relatively inexpensive 3-D printer.

Flickr Photo/etringita (Cc-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman interviews Patricia Kuhl about her new study on the benefits of “parent-ese," or baby talk. Kuhl is a professor and co-director of the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences at the University of Washington.

As the year winds down, The Record looks back at some of our favorite KUOW stories from 2013.

For President Obama, 2013 wasn't just the year of Obamacare. It was also the year of the brain.

In April, Obama announced his Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative — an effort to unlock "the mystery of the three pounds of matter that sits between our ears."

KUOW Photo/Sara Lerner

As the year winds down, The Record looks back at some of our favorite KUOW stories from 2013 and beyond.

Is An Ice Age Boulder Blocking Bertha?

Dec 23, 2013
Flickr Photo/WSDOT

Jeannie Yandel talks with University of Washington geology professor Terry Swanson about glacial erratics and how one might be blocking the tunneling machine named Bertha.

Twitter Photo/AstrobiologyNAI

Forget selfies, geeks and science. The word of the year is astrobiology.

According to KUOW.org’s web trends, a search for the term "astrobiology" was the way many of you found your way to our website.*

From Ellen Forney's Facebook page, University of Washington

Marcie Silman discusses the art of storytelling with University of Washington geologist David Montgomery and Ellen Forney, cartoonist and author of "Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo and Me."

Fred Hutch Photo/Bo Jungmayer

Imagine if rivals Boeing and Airbus teamed up on a new plane, or Microsoft and Apple built a computer.

That’s a bit like what Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center are attempting. Together, the two have launched a start-up, the goal being to develop a new cancer treatment that targets immune cells in the body and turns them into cancer-fighting soldiers.

Roy Baumeister and John Tierney's book "Willpower."

Ross Reynolds speaks with psychologist Roy Baumeister and science writer John Tierney about their book “Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength.”

Cristina Sevin knows the drill. Her 15-year-old son Isaac's first alarm goes off at 6:05 a.m.

When he sleeps right through it, Mom starts the nudging. But she also has to wake up 16-year-old Lily. She flips on the bedroom lights. "Lily, you gotta get up!"

They have to be out the door before 6:35 a.m. in their Annapolis, Md., neighborhood in order to catch the bus for a 7:17 school start. "I wish I didn't have to be awake right now," says Lily.

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