science

Chris Hadfield
3:10 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Astronaut Embraces Social Media To Share The Wonders Of Space Travel

Expedition 35 Commander Chris Hadfield of the Canadian Space Agency rests after his capsule landed in Kazakhstan on May 14, 2013.
Credit Flickr Photo/NASA HQ Photo

Steve Scher talks to Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield about his time on the space station, his viral YouTube video and his new book, "An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth: What Going To Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, And Being Prepared For Anything.”

Neuroscience
3:55 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Can You Be Too Drunk To Remember Smoking Crack?

Flickr Photo/bwats2

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford has been making headlines after admitting to using crack cocaine, stating that it happened "probably in one of my drunken stupors."

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Science
4:06 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Defending Earth From Asteroids

Flickr Photo/Robert Davies

Ross Reynolds talks with Association of Space Explorers' Rusty Schweickart, former astronaut and founder of asteroid defense organization, B612, about defending this planet from space objects.

Environment
7:05 am
Fri November 1, 2013

Spread Of Stink Bugs Alarms Growers, Scientists

The brown marmorated stink bug is 1-2 centimeters in length.
Tom Banse Northwest News Network

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 10:27 am

A malodorous invasive bug has gone from a worry to a certifiable nuisance for some Northwest farmers and gardeners. The name of this insect is a mouthful: the brown marmorated stink bug.

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Neuroscience
4:16 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Brainy Babies: ‘Invisible Bungee Cords’ Explain Early Learning

It's so natural to play patty cake or invite an infant to mimic you - but what's going on in their brains at the time?
Flickr Photo/Evan Long

Stick your tongue out at a newborn, and it will attempt to stick its tongue back at you. Wave your hand, and the baby may wave back. Behavioral psychologists have known for some time how babies love to imitate, but new research from the University of Washington and Temple University sheds light on the neural processes happening within the brain.

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Cardiology
3:22 pm
Wed October 23, 2013

The Progress Of Heart Disease Treatment In The US

A human heart.
From Wikipedia

There have been many innovations in heart disease care and prevention, and former Vice President Dick Cheney has been the beneficiary of nearly every one of those innovations during his three-decade long struggle with the disease. 

It was those medical developments that kept him alive until he received a heart transplant at the age of 71.  Now the former vice president is opening up about his experiences in a book he co-wrote with his cardiologist, “Heart: An American Medical Odyssey.”

The Record’s Steve Scher spoke with Dr. Nahush Mokadam, the co-director of heart transplantation at the University of Washington Medical Center, to get an update on heart disease treatment in the US and determine whether Cheney’s experience was unique.

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Space Tourism
3:19 pm
Wed October 23, 2013

Take A Balloon Trip To Space

Flickr Photo/NASA Goddard Photo and Video

How much would you pay to float above the earth for a few hours? A company called World View Experience is hoping the answer is $75,000.

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Population Impact
5:00 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

How Many Humans Can The Earth Sustain?

Alan Weisman's book "Countdown."

There are 7 billion people on this planet today needing water, food and shelter. There will be another billion in 12 years. How many humans can the earth sustain? Steve Scher talks with Alan Weisman about strategies to ease the human impact on earth. Weisman has written “Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope For A Future On Earth.”

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Science
4:57 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

How Our Choices May Be A Question Of DNA

Douglas T. Kenrick and Vladas Griskevicius' book "The Rational Animal."

The classic observer of human behavior would tell you all of our decisions have a rational basis. But new research indicates that “rational” may not be based on any conscious factors, but instead, is more deeply hardwired in our DNA. Vladas Griskevicius is co author of a new book called “The Rational Animal: How Evolution Made Us Smarter Than We Think.” He talks with Marcie Sillman.

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Parenting
10:06 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Random Bedtimes Breed Bad Behavior In Kids

Play now, pay later: consistency matters when it comes to kids and sleep.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 10:06 am

Parents learn the hard way that late bedtimes make for cranky kids the next day. But inconsistent bedtimes may have a greater effect on children's behavior, a study says.

Kids who didn't go to bed on a regular schedule had more behavior problems at home and at school. When those children were put to bed at the same time each night, their behavior improved.

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Strange Fish
10:01 am
Tue October 15, 2013

18-Foot Oarfish Livens Up A 'Leisurely Snorkel' In California

People hoist the body of an 18-foot oarfish that was discovered in Toyon Bay at Catalina Island off the California coast.
Courtesty of Catalina Island Marine Institute

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 2:43 pm

A snorkeler off the coast of California found more than she bargained for on the ocean floor Sunday, when she saw the large eyes of an 18-foot fish staring back at her. It turned out to be a dead oarfish, a mysterious creature known to live in waters thousands of feet deep.

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Science
5:27 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Richard Dawkins On The Making Of A Scientist

The Record's Steve Scher speaks with writer Richard Dawkins about his new memoir, The Making of a Scientist. To get his points across to the general public, he uses, science of course, as well as math and sometimes, poetry, like this one by the writer,  Aldous Huxley.

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Shutdown Activities
12:49 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

NOAA Continues Only Essential Work In Seattle: Feeding The Fish

Access to the NOAA Sandpoint facility in Seattle is restricted to a skeleton crew of employees who are considered essential.
KUOW Photo/Audrey Carlsen

Paychecks and research have come to a halt at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Seattle due to the partial government shutdown. Some NOAA researchers have been given special dispensation to come in to work only to feed the fish and invertebrates they study.

Morale at NOAA is pretty low for the skeleton crew that continues to come in to forecast the weather. So on Thursday they held a potluck to raise their spirits, serving up dishes with names like sequester quencher soda and filibuster parfait.

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Science Radio
3:42 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Radiolab's Jad Abumrad And Robert Krulwich On Talking Science

Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich on stage in 2011 at the 5th Avenue Theatre in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Jared Kelley

Radiolab is a show about, as the creators simply say, curiosity. It looks into questions on science, philosophy and the human experience. This year, they are touring around the country with their live show, "Apocalyptical." Marcie Sillman talks with hosts Robert Krulwich and Jad Abumrad about their roots and translating science to radio.

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Strange Nature
11:49 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Salty Tanzania Lake Turns Birds Into Stone-Like Statues

Calcified Flamingo, Lake Natron, 2012
Courtesy of Hasted Kraeutler Gallery, NY/Nick Brandt 2013

Correction 10/9/2013: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Lake Natron was 402 miles wide. The lake is 402 square miles.

A lake in Tanzania has come into the spotlight recently thanks to a series of eerie photographs released by photographer Nick Brandt. In his book, “Across the Ravaged Land,” Brandt shows the world what happens to some wildlife when it’s submerged Lake Natron, and it’s not pretty.

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