science

Congressional Politics
10:00 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, Surviving Mass Extinction And Gardening

Annalee Newitz’s new book is about surviving the next big disaster.

Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers
Washington’s 5th Congressional District Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers joins us to talk about transportation priorities following the Skagit River Bridge collapse, federal budget talks, immigration reform and more.

Scatter, Adapt And Remember: How Humans Will Survive A Mass Extinction
Science writer Annalee Newitz’s new book is about hope. Hope that human kind will be able to survive the impending doom that threatens to send us into another mass extinction. Newitz outlines the current scientific discoveries that might help humans survive the next big disaster.

Greendays Gardening Panel
Our panel of gardening experts knows flowers, native plants and vegetables. They join us with garden guidance every Tuesday. Have a question? Send an email to weekday@kuow.org.

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Bridge Collapse
9:00 am
Fri May 24, 2013

I-5 Bridge Collapse, Science News, And The Folklife Festival

Google Maps has already removed the bridge from their maps.
Google Maps

UPDATES: I-5 Skagit River Bridge
We'll get updates from Travis Phelps, WSDOT communications manager, and Larry Ehl, publisher of Transportation Issues Daily and former WSDOT federal relations manager.

Science News
Alan Boyle is science editor for NBC News Digital. From 3-D printed pizzas to the effects of climate change on tornados, he brings us the latest news in the world of science.

Northwest Folklife Festival
The 42nd annual Northwest Folklife Festival kicks off today. What are the can't-miss performances, exhibits and events? We'll get a preview from Folklife's head of programming Debbie Fant. We'll explore  the history of organized labor in Washington state with labor archivist Conor Casey. And we'll hear the tunes of Celtic fiddle music duo Brandon Vance and Mark Minkler.

Social Issues
9:00 am
Fri May 10, 2013

The Tribes And Same-Sex Marriage, Science News, And Beverly Washburn

The Suquamish Tribe Recognized Same-Sex Marriage In 2011: Will Other Tribes?
In March, a Northern Michigan Indian tribe became the third in the US to recognize same-sex marriage. The Suquamish Tribal Council voted to recognize same-sex marriage in 2011. Other tribes have passed laws against. And the US Supreme Court is expected to issue a landmark marriage ruling this summer. Ron Whitener, executive director at Native American Law Center at the University of Washington, explains how the nation’s 563 recognized tribes are approaching the issue.

What’s New In Science News?  
Local virologists are tracking the latest flu in China, and the economics of studying science have led to some new ways to raise money for research. Sally James, Northwest science writer tells us what’s new in science news.

A Conversation With Former Child Star Beverly Washburn
Chances are you’ve seen Beverly Washburn perform, but you didn’t know her name. Have you seen Old Yeller? She was the little girl, Lisbeth. Washburn grew up performing opposite Hollywood greats like Lou Costello and Bing Crosby.   

Weekend Weather Forecast
How will the weather be for Mother's Day this Sunday? Nick Bond joins us with a look at the weekend weather.

International & Military News
9:00 am
Wed May 8, 2013

International Intervention In Syria, Sexual Assault In The Military, And Studying Hormone Levels

Lt. Col. Jeff Krusinski, chief of sexual assault prevention in the Air Force, was arrested and charged with sexual battery over the weekend.
Arlington County Police Department

How The World Is Responding To Syria
The US and Russia have agreed to convene an international conference to discuss ways of diplomatically settling the ongoing conflict in Syria. Dr. Steven Cook, senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, discusses the implications of this conference and how the international community should be intervening in the crisis.
 
Sexual Assault In The Military  
The Pentagon has released a report on sexual assault in the military. It estimates that 26,000 military members were sexually assaulted in 2012, a large increase from the previous year. The report comes out just as Sen. Patty Murray and Sen. Kelly Ayotte argued for a bill that would work to reduce sexual assaults and help victims of the crime. Sen. Patty Murray and KUOW’s Patricia Murphy explain the new bill and the Pentagon's study.   

The Effects Of Blast Injuries On Hormone Levels In Veterans
A new study suggests that people with blast injuries are more likely to have irregular hormone levels. The hormone imbalance can lead to PTSD-like symptoms, depression and physical symptoms that raise the risk of heart attacks and strokes. University of Washington professor Charles Wilkinson studied the hormone levels in veterans who had suffered from concussions caused by blast injuries.

Basketball Diplomacy
NBA Hall of Famer Dennis Rodman is using his friendship with North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un to ask for the release of Kenneth Bae, the Lynnwood man sentenced to 15 years of hard labor for "hostile acts" against the government. Rodman took to Twitter on Tuesday to ask Kim to “do me a solid and cut Kenneth Bae loose.” We talk with Seattle Times editorial writer Thanh Tan, who first urged Rodman via social media to approach his “lifelong friend” on Bae’s behalf.

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Cognitive Science
8:00 pm
Thu April 25, 2013

Inside The Brains Of Animals

A chimp expresses sadness.
Credit Flickr Photo/Tom Holbrook

Some animals display very human behaviors: chimps grieve, rats love to be tickled, and moths remember living as caterpillars.

Science journalist Virginia Morell explores the complex minds of animals in her new book, "Animal Wise." From field sites to laboratories, Morell shows how animal cognition research has evolved, and how animals possess traits many feel are unique to humans.

She spoke at the Elliott Bay Book Company on April 8, 2013.

The Science Of Marijuana
4:31 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

The Marijuana Lab

Marijuana sample at Northwest Botanical Analysis.
Courtesy Northwest Botanical Analysis

The Washington State Liquor Control Board is working to figure out how to create and regulate a legalized marijuana market. It’s not clear whether regulations will include limits on things like potency or pesticide use, but right now, there are only a couple of places in the state equipped to measure marijuana purity and potency.

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Longevity
11:58 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Living To 100

Futurist Sonia Arrison speaking at the Singularity Summit, October 2011.
Flickr Photo/singularitysummit

Futurist Sonia Arrison believes the first person to live to 150 years has already been born. What will the rapidly evolving improvements in medicine and life extension mean for us, our society and the earth? What will living longer mean for careers, family and faith?

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Space Travel
3:34 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Washington Researchers Using Fusion In Effort To Reach Mars

A concept image of a spacecraft powered by a fusion-driven rocket. In this image, the crew would be in the forward-most chamber. Solar panels on the sides would collect energy to initiate the process that creates fusion.
University of Washington, MSNW

Humans are on their way to Mars! Or at least they will be by 2025 if University of Washington researcher, Dr. John Slough has his way. Dr. Slough and his team are working on a fusion powered rocket that could zoom astronauts to mars in as little as 30 days. Back on earth, that speed could take you from Seattle to Miami in 3 minutes. The rocket project is funded by NASA and being built right here in Redmond, Washington. The President can keep is asteroid, Ross Reynolds talks with Dr. Slough about this rocket to Mars.

Police Reform
3:07 pm
Tue April 9, 2013

SPD Chief Diaz Steps Aside

Seattle Police Chief John Diaz at a press conference in 2009.
Credit AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Seattle Police Chief John Diaz announced on Monday that he’s stepping down. Diaz was appointed chief by Mayor Mike McGinn in 2010 and served 33 years with the SPD. Assistant Chief Jim Pugel will lead the department until the city hires a successor. How will Diaz's departure affect SPD morale and the city's ongoing police reforms? We talk with City Attorney Pete Holmes, public defender Lisa Daugaard and Seattle Times reporter Steve Miletich.

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Food
10:00 am
Mon April 8, 2013

Adventures In Digestion With Mary Roach

Mary Roach's 'Gulp.'
Credit Courtesy/W. W. Norton & Company

How does the human digestive system actually work? Why can competitive eaters eat so much, so fast? Why do we like certain food textures better than others? Science writer Mary Roach is the author of books including “Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife" and "Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers." She answers these questions and more in her latest book, “Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal."

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Books
12:00 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

Simon Winchester: SKULLS

Chinese water deer, also known as the vampire deer.
Courtesy of Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers

Skulls are potent symbols of death, life and danger, and they also can tell a fascinating story about natural history. Ross Reynolds talks with writer Simon Winchester about his new book about skulls and a man that obsessively collects them.

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Gardening Tips
10:00 am
Tue April 2, 2013

Greendays Gardening: Pledge Drive Edition

What a beautiful weekend we just had! Did you start a gardening project, do some weeding, or walk the neighborhood and get new ideas? Our gardening experts Greg Rabourn, Marty Wingate and Lisa Taylor join us to answer your questions at 206.543.5869. Show your appreciation for their expertise and become a member of KUOW at 206.543.9595. 

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Food Allergies
11:00 am
Mon March 25, 2013

Don't Eat That! You Could Be Allergic

A buffet table can be a nightmare for people with food allergies.
Credit Flickr Photo/Jay Wilson

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the rate of food allergies in the US has more than doubled over the past decade. The New York Times recently estimated that there are now about 5.9 million children in the United States with food allergies, not to mention another 2.3 million adults. So what’s new in food allergy research? Ross Reynolds talks with Dr. Dave Naimi, board certified in pediatrics and allergies and immunology. Dr. Naimi treats patients in the Everett branch of the Northwest Asthma and Allergy Center.

Science & Technology
2:06 pm
Wed March 20, 2013

Forensic Advances Raise New Questions About Old Convictions

After a forensic dentist used software to correct a distortion in the image a decade later, the original expert witness recanted his testimony.
Courtesy of Jan Stiglitz

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 4:48 pm

Advances in forensic technology are showing that what used to be considered clear-cut proof of guilt may be nothing of the kind. A California case highlights a growing problem facing courts: what to do when an expert witness changes his mind because of better science and technology.

William Richards was convicted of brutally murdering his wife and is serving 25 years to life. The evidence against him was mostly circumstantial and two different juries were unable to reach a verdict. A third trial was aborted because the judge recused himself.

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Science Education
9:00 am
Wed March 20, 2013

NPR's Ira Flatow: Science Is Sexy

NPR science correspondent Ira Flatow.
Credit Courtesy Ira Flatow

Is science sexy? Public radio and TV journalist Ira Flatow thinks so. Every week, he turns scientific discoveries into conversation pieces on his radio program Science Friday. In his talk “Science is Sexy,” he argues that museums, zoos, TV shows and films have overtaken formal education as the main ways people learn about science. Whether it’s the Mars rover or the Large Hadron Collider, scientific research is a hot commodity. Is popular science good for science as a whole?

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