science

Saturn's moon Enceladus is a mystery. From Earth it looks tiny and cold, and yet it's not a dead hunk of rock. Passing spacecraft see trenches and ridges, similar to Earth's, and in 2005 NASA's Cassini mission spotted ice geysers streaming from its south pole.

An orca pod travels past the Seattle skyline. A new study shows that pods are most likely led by older females.
Courtesy of NOAA/Candice Emmons

Nearly every mammal on earth reproduces until they die – except for humans, and two species of whales.

A new study shows that older, female killer whales are most likely to lead their pods as they travel through the salmon foraging grounds of the Pacific Northwest.

Arsenic in drinking water is a worldwide problem. Now a discovery by scientists at the University of Oregon could lead to a new way to remove the toxic chemical, making groundwater supplies safer for communities.

In the environment, arsenic is continuously cycling through different forms and combinations. Sometimes it’s dissolved in water, embedded in rocks, or in gas form in the air. Sometimes the chemical has organic molecules attached to it. Sometimes it doesn’t.

For almost a century, explorers have searched the jungles of Honduras for a legendary lost city known as the White City, or the City of the Monkey God.

A team of explorers — including archaeologists and a documentary filmmaker — have just returned from an expedition in person, after using a new technology to search for evidence of ruins by plane.

We've long known about the master clock in our brains that helps us maintain a 24-hour sleep-wake cycle.

But in recent years, scientists have made a cool discovery: We have different clocks in virtually every organ of our bodies — from our pancreas to our stomach to our fat cells.

Updated at 9:45 a.m. ET.

This morning, a plucky NASA spacecraft has entered the orbit of one of the oddest little worlds in our solar system.

Ceres is round like a planet, but really small. Its total surface would cover just a third of the United States.

George Dante fell in love with taxidermy as a young child. His parents took him to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, and he couldn't tear his eyes away from the dioramas in the Hall of African Mammals.

For this series, we've been thinking a lot about the iconic tools that some of us remember using — if only for a short time — in our early schooling. Things like the slide rule and protractor, the Presidential Fitness Test and wooden blocks.

A Closer Look At The Non-Browning Apple

Feb 20, 2015

You may have heard the U.S. Department of Agriculture has approved a genetically-engineered apple that apparently does not turn brown.

There’s been a lot of media coverage, including some negative feedback about the apples, which will be marketed as Arctic Granny and Arctic Golden.

When you whack yourself with a hammer, it feels like the pain is in your thumb. But really it's in your brain.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Early warnings for earthquakes already occur in Japan, and they’re being piloted in California. Now the University of Washington hopes to bring them to the Northwest.

Drain stencil, Broadview neighborhood in northwest Seattle.  Part of an effort by Seattle Public Utilities and creek advocates to protect water quality in the urban streams.
KUOW Photo/Alan Lande

Marcie Sillman talks with Jen McIntyre, a stormwater researcher at Washington State University, about how polluted stormwater is affecting our marine life. 

Marcie Sillman talks to Bradley Staats, associate professor at the University of North Carolina and visiting associate professor at the Whatron School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania, about his study on worker productivity during good and bad weather.

Rhinos in Kwazulu Natal, South Africa. Seattle company is bioengineering rhino horns to cut down on poaching.`
Flickr Photo/Ian Turk (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Pembient co-founder Matthew Markus. The local biotech startup is bioengineering rhino horn powder with the hopes of curbing poaching in Africa.

Amy Radil

In coming months, all patients in the University of Washington health system and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance will be asked for their permission to have medical records and leftover blood or tissue made available for future research.

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