science

A promising technique for making brain tumors glow so they'll be easier for surgeons to remove is now being tested in cancer patients.

The Brontosaurus may be back.

Not that it ever really went away, at least not in the minds of generations of people who grew up watching Fred Flintstone devour one of his beloved Brontosaurus burgers.

But if you're a scientist, you have to stick to the rules, and in 1903, the name Brontosaurus was struck from the record. That was when paleontologist Elmer Riggs deemed that the Brontosaurus was really just a different dinosaur, Apatosaurus.

Early risers (very early on the U.S. West Coast) who had clear skies might have caught a view of today's lunar eclipse — the third in a cycle of four that had its premiere nearly a year ago.

Those of us on the East Coast (this writer included) got to see a partial eclipse before the moon set in the west.

The Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center as seen from Lake Union.
Flickr Photo/sea turtle (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Luke Timmerman, of the Timmerman Report, about the Fred Hutchinson's Cancer Research Center's efforts to find new ways to bring in revenue for research. 

North Americans could get a glimpse of the Earth shadowing the moon (very) early Saturday — the third in a series of four lunar eclipses that began nearly a year ago. But only those on the West Coast, in the Pacific or Asia will have a chance at seeing the full show.

A department at UW uses reverse engineering to improve flight technology based on nature.
Flickr Photo/Steve Edwards (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Tom Daniel, director of the University of Washington Air Force Center of Excellence on Nature-Inspired Flight Technologies and Ideas, about how reverse engineering biology can improve flight technology.

Using the Internet is an easy way to feel omniscient. Enter a search term and the answers appear before your eyes.

But at any moment you're also just a few taps away from becoming an insufferable know-it-all. Searching for answers online gives people an inflated sense of their own knowledge, according to a study. It makes people think they know more than they actually do.

File photo of cocaine.
Flickr Photo/DBDurietz (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Washington State University neuroscientist Barbara Sorg about her new research into addiction and memory.

The human armpit has a lot to offer bacteria. It's moist, it's warm, and it's usually dark.

But when the bacteria show up, they can make a stink. That's because when some kinds of bacteria encounter sweat they produce smelly compounds, transforming the armpit from a neutral oasis to the mothership of body odor. And one group of bacteria is to blame for the stink, researchers say.

The Antarctic is far away, freezing and buried under a patchwork of ice sheets and glaciers. But a warming climate is altering that mosaic in unpredictable ways — research published Thursday shows that the pace of change in parts of the Antarctic is accelerating.

More than 10 million Americans have trouble distinguishing red from green or blue from yellow, and there's no treatment for colorblindness.

A biotech company and two scientists hope to change that.

Courtesy of Daniel Schavelzon

Sorry, folks: Despite some breathless headlines, no one has found actual Nazis hiding out in a remote stone building in northeastern Argentina.

But a team of Argentine archaeologists says it may have uncovered a secret Nazi hideout dating back to World War II. 

Marcie Sillman speaks with Dr. Nathan White, an emergency room physician at Harborview Medical Center, about an injectable substance he created with UW bioengineers Suzie Pun and Leslie Chan. The product is in very early stages of testing, but White says it could help stop bleeding in trauma patients and save lives.

More than 1,000 guests in gowns and tuxedos crowded into a two-story hall on Saturday night at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

Standing among a pack of well-preserved African elephants, they sampled the delicacies offered by waiters wending their way through the throngs. They had come for the annual dinner of the Explorers Club — and the cocktail-hour fare certainly required an adventurous palate: All of it was made of insects.

A new technology called CRISPR could allow scientists to alter the human genetic code for generations. That's causing some leading biologists and bioethicists to sound an alarm.

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