science

Sleep Science
11:54 pm
Sun December 1, 2013

Parents Of Sleep-Deprived Teens Push For Later School Start Times

Maggie Starbard / NPR

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 2:32 pm

Cristina Sevin knows the drill. Her 15-year-old son Isaac's first alarm goes off at 6:05 a.m.

When he sleeps right through it, Mom starts the nudging. But she also has to wake up 16-year-old Lily. She flips on the bedroom lights. "Lily, you gotta get up!"

They have to be out the door before 6:35 a.m. in their Annapolis, Md., neighborhood in order to catch the bus for a 7:17 school start. "I wish I didn't have to be awake right now," says Lily.

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Hormone Therapy
7:46 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Estrogen May Not Help Prevent Fuzzy Thinking After Menopause

Hormones clearly influence a women's health, but figuring out how is a tricky business.
Andrew Ostrovsky iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 8:16 am

There's a widely held belief that women experience moodiness and fuzzy thinking because of the drop in estrogen during menopause. And women have looked to hormone replacement therapy for relief.

But researchers increasingly think there's not much of a link between declining levels of estrogen during menopause and cognition.

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Buzz Kill
10:32 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Oregon Restricts Pesticides Responsible For Bee Die-Offs

Officials say they believe two pesticides – when sprayed on trees that have their own natural toxicity – become fatally toxic to bees and other pollinators.
Credit Xerces Society Photo/Rich Hatfield

The Oregon Department of Agriculture is restricting the use of two pesticide ingredients implicated in the deaths of more than 50,000 bumble bees earlier this year.

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Environment
9:20 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Women Are Consuming Less Mercury In Their Fish

Blood mercury levels in women are down. EPA says fish advisories have helped women choose fish more wisely. Catfish and salmon are examples of low-mercury fish

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 3:45 pm

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Your Health
11:54 pm
Sun November 24, 2013

In Pregnancy, What's Worse? Cigarettes Or The Nicotine Patch?

Illustration by Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 10:41 am

Lots of studies have shown that cigarette smoke isn't good for a fetus. So many pregnant women use nicotine gum or skin patches or inhalers to help them stay away from cigarettes.

A few years ago, Megan Stern became one of those women. "I smoked heavily for the first seven weeks of my pregnancy because I didn't know I was pregnant," she says. "It was an accidental pregnancy, and I found out while I was in the emergency room for another issue."

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World Population
2:38 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

The Demographic Surprise Inside The Population Explosion

A crowd of people in Lalibela, Ethiopia.
Flickr Photo/gordontour

Steve Scher talks with New Yorker reporter Elizabeth Kolbert and professor Steven Philip Kramer about under-population trends cropping up in some developed countries.  

Environment
4:02 pm
Wed November 20, 2013

600,000 Bats Killed At Wind Farms In 2012, Study Says

Flickr Photo/J.N. Stuart

More than 600,000 bats may have been killed at wind farms in the continental US last year. That’s trouble for agriculture: the US Geological Survey estimated in 2011 that the bats’ natural pest-control saves the industry at least $3 billion a year.

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Author Interview
3:14 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Why Does Morality Sometimes Trump Our Biological Imperatives?

Joshua Greene's book "Moral Tribes."

Marcie Sillman interviews author, philosopher and scientist Joshua Greene about the neuroscience behind morality.

Research
9:39 am
Fri November 15, 2013

UW Regents Approve $123M Underground Animal Testing Lab

Shannon Leahy, Ane Mathieson and Amanda Schemkes were disappointed at UW Regents' approval for the new lab.
Credit KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

The University of Washington Board of Regents unanimously voted to move ahead with a new, underground animal testing lab on Thursday, saying that it will mean better conditions for animals used in medical and scientific research. 

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Chris Hadfield
3:10 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Astronaut Embraces Social Media To Share The Wonders Of Space Travel

Expedition 35 Commander Chris Hadfield of the Canadian Space Agency rests after his capsule landed in Kazakhstan on May 14, 2013.
Credit Flickr Photo/NASA HQ Photo

Steve Scher talks to Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield about his time on the space station, his viral YouTube video and his new book, "An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth: What Going To Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, And Being Prepared For Anything.”

Neuroscience
3:55 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Can You Be Too Drunk To Remember Smoking Crack?

Flickr Photo/bwats2

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford has been making headlines after admitting to using crack cocaine, stating that it happened "probably in one of my drunken stupors."

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Science
4:06 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Defending Earth From Asteroids

Flickr Photo/Robert Davies

Ross Reynolds talks with Association of Space Explorers' Rusty Schweickart, former astronaut and founder of asteroid defense organization, B612, about defending this planet from space objects.

Environment
7:05 am
Fri November 1, 2013

Spread Of Stink Bugs Alarms Growers, Scientists

The brown marmorated stink bug is 1-2 centimeters in length.
Tom Banse Northwest News Network

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 10:27 am

A malodorous invasive bug has gone from a worry to a certifiable nuisance for some Northwest farmers and gardeners. The name of this insect is a mouthful: the brown marmorated stink bug.

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Neuroscience
4:16 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Brainy Babies: ‘Invisible Bungee Cords’ Explain Early Learning

It's so natural to play patty cake or invite an infant to mimic you - but what's going on in their brains at the time?
Flickr Photo/Evan Long

Stick your tongue out at a newborn, and it will attempt to stick its tongue back at you. Wave your hand, and the baby may wave back. Behavioral psychologists have known for some time how babies love to imitate, but new research from the University of Washington and Temple University sheds light on the neural processes happening within the brain.

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Cardiology
3:22 pm
Wed October 23, 2013

The Progress Of Heart Disease Treatment In The US

A human heart.
From Wikipedia

There have been many innovations in heart disease care and prevention, and former Vice President Dick Cheney has been the beneficiary of nearly every one of those innovations during his three-decade long struggle with the disease. 

It was those medical developments that kept him alive until he received a heart transplant at the age of 71.  Now the former vice president is opening up about his experiences in a book he co-wrote with his cardiologist, “Heart: An American Medical Odyssey.”

The Record’s Steve Scher spoke with Dr. Nahush Mokadam, the co-director of heart transplantation at the University of Washington Medical Center, to get an update on heart disease treatment in the US and determine whether Cheney’s experience was unique.

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