science

A Closer Look At The Non-Browning Apple

Feb 20, 2015

You may have heard the U.S. Department of Agriculture has approved a genetically-engineered apple that apparently does not turn brown.

There’s been a lot of media coverage, including some negative feedback about the apples, which will be marketed as Arctic Granny and Arctic Golden.

When you whack yourself with a hammer, it feels like the pain is in your thumb. But really it's in your brain.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Early warnings for earthquakes already occur in Japan, and they’re being piloted in California. Now the University of Washington hopes to bring them to the Northwest.

Drain stencil, Broadview neighborhood in northwest Seattle.  Part of an effort by Seattle Public Utilities and creek advocates to protect water quality in the urban streams.
KUOW Photo/Alan Lande

Marcie Sillman talks with Jen McIntyre, a stormwater researcher at Washington State University, about how polluted stormwater is affecting our marine life. 

Marcie Sillman talks to Bradley Staats, associate professor at the University of North Carolina and visiting associate professor at the Whatron School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania, about his study on worker productivity during good and bad weather.

Rhinos in Kwazulu Natal, South Africa. Seattle company is bioengineering rhino horns to cut down on poaching.`
Flickr Photo/Ian Turk (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Pembient co-founder Matthew Markus. The local biotech startup is bioengineering rhino horn powder with the hopes of curbing poaching in Africa.

Amy Radil

In coming months, all patients in the University of Washington health system and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance will be asked for their permission to have medical records and leftover blood or tissue made available for future research.

Courtesy Jason Yeatman

Two years ago Jason Yeatman, a researcher at the University of Washington, stumbled into a secret corridor of the mind.

Former All-Star point guard Allen Iverson of the Philadelphia 76ers, the story goes, hated luggage so much he used to buy new outfits every time his team went on a road trip. Needless to say, he's had some financial troubles.

KUOW's David Hyde caught this little beauty while jigging in Puget Sound.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Jeannie Yandel talks with Elaina Jorgensen, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's cephalopod expert, about squidding as a new hobby and what we know about the squid in Puget Sound. 

As any CSI enthusiast understands, the tiniest details can help forensic scientists figure out how and when people died. These days, investigators are taking advantage of information about microbes that live on human bodies and the insects that come to feed on corpses to crack cases.

Elephants at Addo Elephant Park in the Eastern Cape, South Africa.
Flickr Photo/Clive Reid (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to University of Washington biology professor Samuel Wasser about how his lab uses elephant DNA to pinpoint where large ivory poaching operations happen in Africa. Representative Eric Pettigrew has sponsored a bill in the Washington state House of Representatives that would ban ivory in the state.

Ross Reynolds talks to Peter Lape, curator of archeology at the Burke Museum, about the origins of the Kennewick Man.

biotech file photo
Flickr Photo/HCC PIO (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Marcie Sillman talks to Luke Timmerman about the growth of a Seattle biotech company, Adaptive Biotechnologies, and what it means for the city's biotechnology industry.

Flickr Photo/U.S. Fish & Wildlife (CC-BY-NC-ND)

There is no such thing as a seahawk, but you super fans probably knew that already.

“Seahawk is one of those colloquial terms much like a sparrowhawk or buzzard or seagull,” said ornithologist John Klicka of the University of Washington's Burke Museum. “From a sort of a scientific perspective there's no such thing.”

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