science

Science Meets Sasquatch
10:04 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Sasquatch Reality Show Filmed In Northwest Premieres This Week

The search for Sasquatch is on on '10 Million Dollar Big Foot Bounty.'
Spike TV

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 5:06 pm

A new cable reality show features rugged Northwesterners tromping through the region’s beautiful landscapes. They’re searching for a Northwest icon -- Sasquatch.

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Technology
3:12 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

Is Biohacking Just Misunderstood?

Ross Reynolds talks with double-RFID implantee and self-described DIY biohacker Amal Graafstra who runs a business called Dangerous Things that helps people implant RFID chips into their body to open doors, start motorcycles and log onto computers. 

Fossil Replication
10:20 am
Tue January 7, 2014

How A 3-D Printer Is Helping Preserve A Saber-Tooth Salmon

A saber-toothed salmon, as depicted by artist Ray Troll. The mural is part of the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History.
University of Oregon

For years, museum conservators and paleontologists have yearned for a way to duplicate fragile fossils without damaging them. Now scientists with the University of Oregon say they have found a way to do just that, with the help of a relatively inexpensive 3-D printer.

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Parent-ese
1:13 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

'Baby Talk' Helps Babies Learn To Speak More Quickly

Flickr Photo/etringita

Marcie Sillman interviews Patricia Kuhl about her new study on the benefits of “parent-ese," or baby talk. Kuhl is a professor and co-director of the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences at the University of Washington.

The Record's Picks
12:54 pm
Fri December 27, 2013

Pulled From The Archives: Evolution, Science, And Black In Seattle

Tonya Mosley, creator of the Black in Seattle series.

As the year winds down, The Record looks back at some of our favorite KUOW stories from 2013.

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Health
12:22 am
Fri December 27, 2013

Can A Fruit Fly Help Explain Autism?

A newly discovered neural circuit in the brain of the common fruit fly seems to serve as a sort of "volume control," turning up and down the perception of sound and light.
Nicholas Monu iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri December 27, 2013 7:54 am

For President Obama, 2013 wasn't just the year of Obamacare. It was also the year of the brain.

In April, Obama announced his Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative — an effort to unlock "the mystery of the three pounds of matter that sits between our ears."

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The Record's Picks
11:51 am
Thu December 26, 2013

Pulled From The Archives: Race, The Cosmos, And Seattle Music

Emily Nuckols and Kala Armijo at Red Light in Seattle. Seattle artist Mackelmore sparked a thrift store revival.
KUOW Photo/Sara Lerner

As the year winds down, The Record looks back at some of our favorite KUOW stories from 2013 and beyond.

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SR 99 Tunnel
2:45 pm
Mon December 23, 2013

Is An Ice Age Boulder Blocking Bertha?

Flickr Photo/WSDOT

Jeannie Yandel talks with University of Washington geology professor Terry Swanson about glacial erratics and how one might be blocking the tunneling machine named Bertha.

Geeks, Indeed
8:30 am
Fri December 20, 2013

KUOW's Word Of The Year Is Astrobiology (You Picked It, Not Us)

Credit Twitter Photo/AstrobiologyNAI

Forget selfies, geeks and science. The word of the year is astrobiology.

According to KUOW.org’s web trends, a search for the term "astrobiology" was the way many of you found your way to our website.*

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Town Hall Seattle
2:32 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

Telling Stories Through Comics And Science

Ellen Forney and David Montgomery
Credit From Ellen Forney's Facebook page, University of Washington

Marcie Silman discusses the art of storytelling with University of Washington geologist David Montgomery and Ellen Forney, cartoonist and author of "Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo and Me."

Science
7:42 am
Thu December 5, 2013

Power Team: Fred Hutch, Sloan-Kettering Launch Cancer Research Start-Up

Dr. Phil Greenberg, head of the immunology program at Fred Hutchinson, is a co-founder of Juno Therapeutics, a commercial venture.
Credit Fred Hutch Photo/Bo Jungmayer

Imagine if rivals Boeing and Airbus teamed up on a new plane, or Microsoft and Apple built a computer.

That’s a bit like what Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center are attempting. Together, the two have launched a start-up, the goal being to develop a new cancer treatment that targets immune cells in the body and turns them into cancer-fighting soldiers.

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Author Interview
2:59 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

How Willpower Is Like A Muscle

Roy Baumeister and John Tierney's book "Willpower."

Ross Reynolds speaks with psychologist Roy Baumeister and science writer John Tierney about their book “Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength.”

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Sleep Science
11:54 pm
Sun December 1, 2013

Parents Of Sleep-Deprived Teens Push For Later School Start Times

Maggie Starbard / NPR

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 2:32 pm

Cristina Sevin knows the drill. Her 15-year-old son Isaac's first alarm goes off at 6:05 a.m.

When he sleeps right through it, Mom starts the nudging. But she also has to wake up 16-year-old Lily. She flips on the bedroom lights. "Lily, you gotta get up!"

They have to be out the door before 6:35 a.m. in their Annapolis, Md., neighborhood in order to catch the bus for a 7:17 school start. "I wish I didn't have to be awake right now," says Lily.

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Hormone Therapy
7:46 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Estrogen May Not Help Prevent Fuzzy Thinking After Menopause

Hormones clearly influence a women's health, but figuring out how is a tricky business.
Andrew Ostrovsky iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 8:16 am

There's a widely held belief that women experience moodiness and fuzzy thinking because of the drop in estrogen during menopause. And women have looked to hormone replacement therapy for relief.

But researchers increasingly think there's not much of a link between declining levels of estrogen during menopause and cognition.

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Buzz Kill
10:32 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Oregon Restricts Pesticides Responsible For Bee Die-Offs

Officials say they believe two pesticides – when sprayed on trees that have their own natural toxicity – become fatally toxic to bees and other pollinators.
Credit Xerces Society Photo/Rich Hatfield

The Oregon Department of Agriculture is restricting the use of two pesticide ingredients implicated in the deaths of more than 50,000 bumble bees earlier this year.

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