science

It's been a busy summer on the high seas for researchers trying to figure out the inner workings of an ominous earthquake fault. The Cascadia Subduction Zone runs offshore from Vancouver Island to Northern California. When it rips, we could have a magnitude 9 catastrophe.

University of Washington geophysicist Paul Johnson led a nearly month-long research cruise to the likely epicenter for the Big One. His ship carried an unmanned minisub to probe the seafloor directly over the still somewhat mysterious Cascadia earthquake fault.

Being a wildlife biologist in the 21st century increasingly means rescuing rare animals from extinction. Among the success stories is the whooping crane. Seventy years ago there were only about 16 birds left on the planet. Now there are about 600.

Weird Science: The Conversation Explores The Natural World

Aug 26, 2013
David Montgomery's book "The Rocks Don't Lie"

The world is a mysterious place. In labs and observatories around the world, people are trying to make sense of nature’s secrets. This hour on The Conversation we talk to scientists and science writers about the natural world around us and what scientists are doing to harness its power.

Flickr Photo/NOAA's National Ocean Service

War Stories

War is often remembered through history textbooks. Shortly before Veteran’s Day 2004, Weekday took a look at war through the eyes of soldiers and their families. Steve Scher talked with two Medal of Honor recipients: retired Air Force Col. Joe M. Jackson and retired Army Maj. Gen. Patrick H. Brady.

Aggregation: Swarming, Flocking And Schooling

Many of us have experienced "the wave" at a baseball game, and most of us have marveled at fish swimming in schools or starlings whirling around in the evening sky. In 2009, Steve Scher talked with Julia Parish, associate director of the school of aquatic and fishery sciences at the University of Washington, about why animals move together.

David Sedaris On Smoking

In this past month, Washington state cut funding for the smoking cessation hotline. Humorist David Sedaris has a different approach to quit smoking. Instead of calling the hotline, Sedaris moved to Japan. His story "The Smoking Section" is just one of 17 essays in his book “When You Are Engulfed in Flames. Steve Scher talked with David Sedaris back in 2008 about smoking and other tales.

Humans Look Forward To Turning Into Robots

Aug 13, 2013
Tali Sharot's book "The Optimism Bias"

  Are you optimistic about the future of science? A recent Pew Survey found that 71 percent of Americans believe artificial arms and legs will perform better than natural ones by 2050, and 69 percent believe there will be a cure for most forms of cancer by then.

Will most Americans be springing for artificial limbs in 40 years? Maybe not. But we are certainly optimistic about the possibility of it all. Ross Reynolds talks with Tali Sharot, research fellow in the department of cognitive, perceptual and brain sciences at University College London and the author of “The Optimism Bias: A Tour of the Irrationally Positive Brain.”

Flickr Photo/World Bank Photo Collection

Science News
What does laboratory hamburger meat have in common with Mars Rover “Curiosity” and Jeff Bezos? They’re the focus of Alan Boyle’s science news update. He's the science editor for NBC News Digital. He'll tell us what you’ll be eating, reading and dreaming about in the years to come.

The Opt-Out Generation Wants Back In
In the late 1990’s and early 2000’s, many successful women left the workforce to stay home and raise children. The trend was documented in a 2003 New York Times Magazine cover story called “The Opt-Out Revolution.” Now many of these same women want back in. In this week’s follow-up issue, journalist Judith Warner explores why so many women who once opted-out are opting back in, and how their lives have changed. What about you? If you left the workforce to have children, what did you give up? If you’re just now rejoining the workforce, what challenges are you facing? Share your thoughts by emailing Weekday.

Jesse Bering's book "Why is the Penis Shaped Like That?"

Protests In Egypt
Supporters and opponents to former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi held rallies throughout Egypt on Friday. Tensions between the two sides have been escalating over the past month resulting in the death of over 100 people. We get an update on the situation in Egypt from Middle East correspondent for the Financial Times, Borzou Daragahi. We also talk with Maha Jashan, a local Egyptian-American, on how she’s been following the events in Egypt from Seattle. 

"Why Is The Penis Shaped Like That? And Other Reflections On Being Human"
Being human is very different than being a chimpanzee, or a bumble bee, or a rat. We think different, we act different, and we look different. Psychological scientist Jesse Bering explores what it means to be human by asking questions that are sometimes outside the realm of “polite conversation.” 

New State Laws On The Books
Starting today, it will be easier for the wrongly convicted to receive restitution for jail time served, people parking in electric vehicle charging stations will be fined if they aren’t plugged in, and bosses can no longer demand social media passwords from prospective employees. Everett Herald reporter and columnist Jerry Cornfield gives us an overview.

NASA Builds A Laser From The Moon To The Earth

Jul 19, 2013
Flickr Photo/NASA Goddard Photo and Video

NASA is returning to the moon this summer, but not to plant a flag and hit a golf ball. The space agency is building lasers to send information. Why are lasers the new technology for space communication? Ross Reynolds hears from Don Cornwell, the mission manager for the Lunar Laser Communications Demonstration at NASA.

Science News, And Candlebox

Jul 19, 2013
From Candlebox' Facebook page.

The News From Space
NBC News Digital science editor Alan Boyle discusses the latest news in physical and space science.

20th Anniversary Of The Band, Candlebox
Seattle band Candlebox made its debut in 1993, in the golden age of alternative rock in the Northwest. Now, 20 years since their first album release Candlebox is once again touring and creating new music. Lead singer Kevin Martin explains what it was like to make music in the era of Seattle alternative rock and how their music has changed over the years.  

Flickr Photo/NASA Goddard Photo and Video

Planetary Resources, a company based in Bellevue, decided to bridge the gap between the planet and the cosmos with the world’s first crowd-funded, publicly-accessible telescope. Their Kickstarter campaign recently raised over $1.5 million from 17,614 people in just 33 days.

Imagining The Future With Seattle Luminaries

Jul 12, 2013
Portrait of Maggie Wilson watching a 3-D movie
Flickr Photo/Mike Licht

When science fiction author and casual prophet Isaac Asimov wrote about his visit to the World’s Fair in New York in 1964, he imagined what the world would be like in 50 years. Almost 50 years later he seems to have gotten a few things right: “Robots will neither be common nor very good in 2014, but they will be in existence. The IBM exhibit at the present fair has no robots but it is dedicated to computers, which are shown in all their amazing complexity, notably in the task of translating Russian into English.”

Google translate anyone?

Jaron Lanier Asks: Who Owns The Future?

Jul 12, 2013
Jaron Lanier's book "Who Owns the Future?"

Jaron Lanier is a pioneer in virtual reality and the Internet. But in recent years he’s become more and more skeptical of the promises of the Web.  Ross Reynolds talks to Jaron Lanier about his new book, "Who Owns the Future."

This program originally aired May 31, 2013.

Flickr Photo/Nicole Miller

Examining The King County Sheriff's Office
KUOW's Amy Radill explains what the Office of Law Enforcement Oversight report says about a 2012 officer-involved shooting in Auburn.

Science News
Luke Timmerman, national biotech editor for Xconomy brings us the latest news in biotechnology.  

Soccer Star Megan Rapinoe
International and national soccer superstar Megan Rapinoe discusses her career on the US Women's soccer team and now the Seattle Reign FC. The local team plays a home game this Sunday at Starfire Sports Complex.

Flickr Photo/Noelle Noble

Budget Deal In Olympia
Everett Herald columnist and Weekday’s regular Olympia guru Jerry Cornfield brings us analysis of the tentative budget deal reached by state lawmakers.
 
Immigration Deal In DC
Yesterday's immigration reform vote is being hailed as a rare example of bipartisanship. The Senate voted 68 to 32 yesterday to overhaul the nation’s immigration system. It now heads to the House. We talk with Jill Jackson of CBS News from Washington, DC.

Rethinking How We Study Cancer
A scientist at Johns Hopkins University developed a mathematical model to better understand why some cancer tumors are resistant to cancer fighting drugs. Science reporter Carl Zimmer explains the study and how scientists are changing the way they think about cancer.

Pet Questions Answered
Got a difficult dog or cat? Pet trainer, Steve Duno, tackles your questions at 206.543.5869 (KUOW).  Also, is neutering dogs always a good idea?  

Pages