science

Layoffs In Seattle
2:56 pm
Wed July 30, 2014

Amgen, Seattle's Largest Biotech Employer, Is Leaving Town

The double helix bridge over the railroad tracks along Elliott Avenue at the Seattle Amgen facility.
Flickr Photo/Chas Redmond (CC-BY-NC-ND)

California-based biotech firm Amgen announced on Tuesday that it would close its Seattle and Bothell campuses by 2015, resulting in the loss of 660 jobs locally. The closure is part of a company-wide layoff of an estimated 2,400 to 2,900.

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Launching Startups
4:33 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Seattle Startups Unveil Futuristic Products To Potential Investors

Tim Dardis explains the idea behind Project Canton's injury reducing football helmet.
Credit KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Startup companies from the University of Washington showed off their innovative products to potential investors and industry advisors Tuesday.

The UW launched a record 18 startups last fiscal year with the support from the UW Center for Commercialization.

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Cancer Research
3:12 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

What Are Scorpion Venom And Brain Tumors Doing In A Lab Together?

Dr. Jim Olson
Courtesy of Susie Fitzhugh/Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

After removing a tumor, surgeons are confronted with an unfortunate reality: They can’t be sure they got it all. It can be difficult to distinguish between normal tissue and cancerous cells while operating.

Dr. Jim Olson, an oncologist at the University of Washington, was inspired by his young patients to find a way to ensure that surgeons didn’t miss anything.

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Animal Behavior
11:24 am
Wed July 23, 2014

Dogs Understand Fairness, Get Jealous, Study Finds

Originally published on Tue December 9, 2008 8:07 am

Dogs have an intuitive understanding of fair play and become resentful if they feel that another dog is getting a better deal, a new study has found.

The study, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, looked at how dogs react when a buddy is rewarded for the same trick in an unequal way.

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Risk And Reason
2:26 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Pop Quiz: 20 Percent Chance Of Rain. Do You Need An Umbrella?

Will it rain or not? How you interpret the forecast could mean the difference between getting soaked or staying safe.
Maria Pavlova iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 2:04 pm

This week, All Things Considered is exploring how people interpret probability. What does it mean to us, for example, when a doctor says an operation has a 70 percent chance of success?

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Science
2:31 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

Sixth-Grader's Science Project Catches Ecologists' Attention

Scientists previously underestimated the ability of the lionfish to live in less salty water.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 10:28 am

(July 24, 2014: See the editor's note at the bottom of this page for an explanation of the story's new headline.)

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.

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Global Health
7:37 am
Sun July 20, 2014

As Polar Icebox Shrinks, Infectious Pathogens Move North

Originally published on Sun July 20, 2014 9:08 am

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Infectious diseases may be spreading more quickly, thanks to global warming. Viruses that were kept in check by the polar ice box are being released. And as some animals move north to keep cool, they're bringing all sorts of parasites with them, from microbes to ticks. Christopher Solomon has written about this in the August issue of "Scientific American." And he joins me now from Montana Public Radio in Missoula. Welcome.

CHRISTOPHER SOLOMON: Good to be here, Arun.

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Survey Results
7:58 am
Thu July 17, 2014

Young Scientists Say They're Sexually Abused In The Field

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 12:44 pm

Many young scientists dream of their first trip to a remote research site — who wouldn't want to hang out with chimps like Jane Goodall, or sail to the Galapagos like Charles Darwin, exploring the world and advancing science?

But for many scientists, field research can endanger their health and safety.

In a survey of scientists engaged in field research, the majority — 64 percent — said they had personally experienced sexual harassment while at a field site, and 22 percent reported being the victim of sexual assault.

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Medical Breakthroughs
3:23 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Rewiring Nerves So The Brain Can Move Prosthetic Limbs

Marcie Sillman talks with Dr. Doug Smith, an orthopedic surgeon at Harborview and the University of Washington, about emerging technology in which nerves can be relocated in amputated limbs so the brain can control prosthetic devices.

Dental Work
3:07 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

This Dirty Little Weed May Have Cleaned Up Ancient Teeth

This young male, buried at a prehistoric site in Central Sudan, probably munched on the roots of a plant called purple nutsedge.
Donatella Usai Centro Studi Sudanesi and Sub-Sahariani

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 2:35 pm

The menus of millennia past can be tough to crack, especially when it comes to fruits and vegetables. For archaeologists studying a prehistoric site in Sudan, dental plaque provided a hint.

"When you eat, you get this kind of film of dental plaque over your teeth," says Karen Hardy, an archaeologist with the Catalan Institute for Research and Advanced Studies at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona.

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Natural Explanation?
8:40 am
Wed July 16, 2014

A Huge New Crater Is Found In Siberia, And The Theories Fly

Aerial footage posted online shows a large crater in northern Siberia, in an area called "the end of the world."
YouTube

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 9:46 am

The area of Russia is said to be called, ominously enough, the end of the world. And that's where researchers are headed this week, to investigate a large crater whose appearance reportedly caught scientists by surprise. The crater is estimated at 262 feet wide and is in the northern Siberian area of Yamal.

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Pelagornis Sandersi
7:30 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Fossil Discovery May Reveal Largest Bird Ever To Fly

Line drawing of World’s Largest-Ever Flying Bird, Pelagornis sandersi, showing comparative wingspan. Shown left, a California Condor, shown right, a Royal Albatross. (Liz Bradford/WNPR)

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 12:03 pm

An extinct species of bird just discovered by a Connecticut scientist may have been the largest ever to fly. The pelagornis sandersi lived 25 million years ago. The fossil was uncovered at an airport in the 1980s but went largely unnoticed until 2010.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Patrick Skahill of WNPR has the story on the bird with a 24-foot wingspan, and what the finding means for paleontologists.

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Early Childhood
12:06 pm
Mon July 14, 2014

Long Before Babies Talk, They're Plotting Away

A baby sits in a magnetoencephalography brain scanner at the UW Institute for Learning and Brain Science while listening to vowel sounds.
Credit Institute for Learning and Brain Science / University of Washington

A University of Washington study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science gives clues about how talking to babies from an early age helps them say their first words.

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Moon Snails
8:16 am
Mon July 14, 2014

What's Killing Clams? Solve This Low Tide Mystery

Why did so many healthy clams turn up dead at low tide last week?
Credit KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

One of the lowest tides of the year this weekend revealed a "crime scene" at the beach at Golden Gardens Park in Seattle.

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Basic Science
7:25 am
Fri July 11, 2014

Ducks Do It Differently, And Science Wants You To Know About It

A duck with secrets that only science can uncover.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 10:15 am

Scientists who carry out basic research sometimes find themselves unexpectedly caught up in a web of vitriolic public attacks by politicians pretending to expose foolish, dollar-wasting projects. Patricia Brennan, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, found this out the hard way.

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