same-sex marriage

Michael Shiosaki and Mayor Ed Murray at a 'StoryCorps' booth in Seattle.
Courtesy of StoryCorps

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray and his husband  Michael Shiosaki recount how their relationship parallels the many changes in the laws on same-sex couples. 

Murray decided to run for an office in the state legislature because a good friend asked him to do it: Washington's first openly gay politican, Cal Anderson. At a StoryCorps booth in Seattle's New Holly neighborhood, Murray and Shiosaki talked about making the decision to enter public life.  

The Oregon Commission on Judicial Fitness and Disability said Monday Judge Vance Day should be removed from office after refusing to perform same-sex weddings. Day's spokesperson said in a statement that the judge would vigorously defend his innocence and his rights at the state's highest court.

The chief justice of Alabama's Supreme Court has ordered the state's probate judges not to issue marriage license to same-sex couples — despite a decision by the U.S. Supreme Court last year that legalized same-sex marriage in America.

Roy S. Moore, the chief justice of the state Supreme Court, issued an administrative order Wednesday. He noted that the Supreme Court of Alabama had, in March of 2015, upheld the state's ban on same-sex marriage.

Updated at 1:39 p.m. ET

A federal judge found a Kentucky clerk at the center of the national debate over same-sex marriage in contempt of court after she defied the Supreme Court by refusing to issue marriage licenses in protest of such marriages.

Kentucky Public Radio's Ryland Barton reports that District Judge David L. Bunning ordered Kim Davis taken into custody by federal marshals "until she complies" with a court order.

The government said Thursday it will make federal marriage benefits available to all same-sex couples.

The Obama administration had previously extended most federal benefits to married same-sex couples. But the federal government could not distribute Social Security and VA benefits to couples living in states where such marriages were prohibited.

Steven Durant, left, and Ed Malick were both married to women before coming out as gay.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

The Supreme Court ruling effectively legalizing same sex marriage nationwide has been seen as a huge victory for the lesbian, gay and transgender community.

But that doesn't mean LGBT people automatically have equal rights and protections - even in Washington state, where some equal protection laws have been on the books since 2006.

Gabby Turner, 19, and Eva Rozelle, 16, said they haven't experienced homophobia growing up in Seattle. In fact, they said coming out wasn't really necessary for their generation.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

On Sunday morning, ahead of Seattle Pride 2015, marchers gathered in a parking lot under the freeway. They blew balloons, lathered on sunscreen and told what Pride means to them.

At Pride events in New York City this weekend, the emotional excitement about marriage equality was evident. But many people also were thrilled about the practical considerations.

Friday’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling on gay marriage reflects a remarkable shift in Americans' personal views, just in the last decade.

Republican state lawmaker Maureen Walsh of Walla Walla, Washington, is celebrating Friday’s Supreme Court ruling that legalized gay marriage nationwide.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Peter Nicolas, professor of law at the University of Washington, about what the Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage means for gay couples in Washington. Nicolas also looks at how the ruling might be challenged in states where gay marriage is banned.

Dan Savage and husband Terry Miller are seen in a 2011 photo.
Flickr photo/Chris Tse (CC BY-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/a69LS4

Marcie Sillman speaks with The Stranger's Dan Savage about the U.S. Supreme Court ruling giving same-sex couples across the United States the right to marry. 

Justice Mary Yu, at the Washington State Supreme Court's Temple of Justice.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Marcie Sillman speaks with state Supreme Court Justice Mary Yu about her reaction to the legalization of same-sex marriage across the U.S. Yu presided over the first same-sex marriage in King County after statewide legalization in 2012. 

There has been a big reset in the culture wars.

The Supreme Court on Friday upheld the rights of gays and lesbians to marry in all 50 states. States across the South are lowering the confederate flag, and the Supreme Court has, for the second time, voted to preserve the Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare.

The results marked big wins for liberals after decades-long battles, in one form or another, on some of the issues.

A display of wedding cake figurines featuring same sex couples.
Archie McPhee Seattle

Facebook posts, tweets and Instagram photos poured out after the Supreme Court ruled that marriage is right for all Americans, including the nation's lesbian and gay citizens. Washington state has had same-sex marriage since 2012, but there was robust debate on social media around the state about the court's ruling.

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