salmon

Environment
7:35 am
Sat April 19, 2014

DNR Postpones Clear-Cuts It Approved Near Oso Landslide

DNR's proposed Riley Rotor timber sale in red, with salmon streams in yellow, near Oso, Wash.
Credit Courtesy Washington Forest Law Center

Washington state officials have postponed selling 250 acres of timber on steep slopes near the town of Oso.

Read more
Wanapum Dam
4:01 am
Wed April 16, 2014

Endangered Salmon Migrate Via Trucks Around Cracked Dam

At Priest Rapids Dam workers practice transporting salmon in trucks. They'll have to transport hundreds of fish a day so the salmon can get past the lowered water and several dams.
Anna King Northwest News Network

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 3:05 pm

The Columbia River will remain drawn down at least until June because of the cracked Wanapum Dam in southeast Washington.

Read more
A Leader's Legacy
3:48 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Billy Frank Jr.: Tribes Must Try To Bring The Salmon Back

Billy Frank Jr., known for his decades of defending Washington tribes’ treaty rights, fears the rights will be worthless as overfishing, dams and climate change take their toll on the habitats salmon need to survive. Photo taken in August 2012.
Credit EarthFix Photo/Katie Campbell

Billy Frank Jr. helped secure Indian fishing rights through protest and legal action in the 1960s and '70s. The 83-year-old Nisqually tribe member has been arrested about 50 times over the years; the first time was in 1945 when he was 14, for fishing.

Read more
Fishing Season
8:14 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Banner Summer On Tap For Ocean Salmon Fishing

File photo. Fisheries managers are expecting a banner year for ocean salmon fishing.
Michael B Flickr

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 6:23 pm

A federal fisheries management panel has approved what some charter captains are calling the best ocean fishing season in 20 years.

Read more
Drought Migration
12:21 am
Wed March 26, 2014

What A Long, Strange Trip: Salmon Are Trucking To The Pacific Ocean

Pacific Or Bust: Fingerling Chinook salmon are dumped into a holding pen as they are transferred from a truck into the Sacramento River Tuesday in Rio Vista, Calif. From here, they'll be towed downstream for a bit, then make their own way out to the Pacific Ocean.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

In California, severe drought has imperiled millions of juvenile salmon who now face waters too dry to let them make their usual spawning trip to the ocean. So state and federal officials have embarked on a drastic plan to save them – by letting them hitch a ride on tanker trucks.

Over the next two and a half months, some 30 million Chinook salmon will be trucked from five hatcheries in the state's Central Valley to waters where they can make their way to the ocean.

Read more
Environment
5:08 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Fish Experts Plan A Salmon Water Slide On Cracked Wanapum Dam

File photo of the fish ladder at John Day Dam on the Columbia River. The fish ladders at the Wanapum and the Rock Island dams are dry.
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 3:24 pm

The ongoing issue with the cracked Wanapum Dam in central Washington is now creating a problem for migrating salmon.

Read more
Grand Coulee Dam
9:46 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Tribes Push To Restore Salmon To Upper Columbia River

A pre-conference tour of Grand Coulee Dam on Monday kicked off a conversation about restoring salmon to the Upper Columbia Basin.
Tom Banse Northwest News Network

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 4:00 pm

Once upon a time, salmon and steelhead swam over a thousand miles upriver to the headwaters of the mighty Columbia River, at the foot of the Rockies in British Columbia.

Read more
Food For Thought
3:49 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

Salmon: 'Nature's Earliest Convenience Food'

Flickr Photo/cobalt123 (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with author Nicholaas Mink about the early days of salmon and how the fish changed the culture in the Pacific Northwest. His latest book is, "Salmon: A Global History."

EarthFix Reports
9:08 am
Tue March 11, 2014

An Undammed River’s Sediment Brings New Life Downstream

About 3 million cubic yards of sediment have been flushed down the Elwha River since dam removal began in 2011. That’s only 16 percent of what’s expected to move downstream in the next five years.
Credit EarthFix Photo/Katie Campbell

Anne Shaffer sits on the sandy shoreline of the Elwha River and looks around in amazement. Just two years ago, this area would have been under about 20 feet of water.

Read more
Fish And Wildlife
2:58 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Salmon Forecast Predicts 'Historical Run' For Chinook And Coho

Flickr Photo/Eva Funderburgh (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Ryan Lothrop, recreational fishery manager at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, about forecasting salmon runs for the 2014-15 fishing season.

Lothrop said about 283,000 Chinook and 870,000 coho salmon are expected to return to Puget Sound this year.

EarthFix Reports
8:46 am
Wed February 26, 2014

2014 Fall Chinook Returns Could Be Biggest On Record

A chinook salmon photographed in the Snake River in 2013. That year's run set records, but 2014 returns are on track to outnumber last year's in the Columbia and Snake rivers.
Aaron Kunz

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 6:00 pm

The future is looking bright for fall chinook salmon in the Columbia and Snake rivers. Predictions are in that this could be another record-breaking year for the fish.

Officials are predicting the largest return on record since 1938. That’s 1.6 million Columbia River fall chinook. Nearly 1 million of those fish will come from salmon near Hanford Reach. These are known as upriver brights, said Stuart Ellis, fisheries biologist with the Columbia River Intertribal Fish Commission.

Read more
EarthFix Reports
8:52 am
Tue February 25, 2014

How One Dam Increased Fish Survival By Managing Its Water

Ryan Harnish led a study showing the effects of Central Washington's Priest Rapid Dam operations on young salmon downstream. In the background is Locke Island, one of the best spawning habitats for salmon in the Columbia River.
Courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 12:02 am

RICHLAND, Wash. -- For better salmon survival: be sure to keep salmon eggs and newly hatched fish under the water. Those are the key findings of a new study that says large numbers of fish survived when a Central Washington dam carefully controlled its water releases.

The study looked at an area of the Columbia River known as Hanford Reach, a 50-mile stretch in Central Washington along the Hanford site. It's one of the longest free-flowing areas of the river.

Read more
EarthFix Reports
9:24 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Stalking Puget Sound Steelhead With Science

The crew of the research vessel Chasina gets ready to drop an acoustic telemetry receiver 300 feet down into Puget Sound. The device will record tagged steelhead as they swim out of their spawning rivers.
Credit KUOW Photo/Ashley Ahearn

You might call Barry Berejikian a steelhead stalker.

The government scientist’s pursuit of these anadromous trout has brought him to the deck of the Chasina, a research vessel that’s motoring through choppy gray waters of southern Puget Sound near the Tacoma Narrows Bridge.

Read more
Resource Management
8:59 am
Tue February 4, 2014

Why Is Lake Washington's Water Level So Low? Ask The Engineers

The Lake Washington Ship Canal connects the lake with Puget Sound via Lake Union. The Army Corps of Engineers controls the water level of the lake by manipulating the water flow at the Ballard Locks.
Credit Flickr Photo/Seattle Munincipal Archives

You may have noticed that water levels at Lake Washington beaches are very low.

But if you think there might be some connection with the drought that is now gripping much of the western U.S., think again.

Read more
EarthFix Reports
9:26 am
Mon February 3, 2014

Pot vs Fish: Can We Grow Salmon-Friendly Weed?

A national park ranger helps other law enforcement agencies eradicate a marijuana growing operation discovered in the park.
David Snyder for the NPS

Originally published on Fri January 31, 2014 1:48 pm

As marijuana has become more mainstream, the business of cultivating the plant has boomed. That’s true nowhere more than in coastal northern California. There, the so-called Emerald Triangle of Mendocino, Trinity and Humboldt counties is believed to be the largest cannabis-growing region in the US.

But as the hills have sprouted thousands of new grow operations, haphazard cultivation is threatening the recovery of endangered West Coast salmon and steelhead populations.

Read more

Pages