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Republican Party

Ohio Gov. John Kasich picked up some endorsements in Washington state, but he distantly trails the front-runners in the race for the GOP nomination.
Courtesy John Kasich campaign

Ohio Governor John Kasich is getting some love from Republican leaders heading into next month's presidential primary here in Washington state.

Kerry French at American Lake in Lakewood. She's campaigning for Sen. Ted Cruz in Pierce County.
KUOW PHOTO/Amy Radil

Kerry French, a Republican leader in Pierce County, campaigns for Ted Cruz, the presidential candidate, with a smart phone app.

Users earn “points” as they give information and get the word out. First comes a brief survey, which French demonstrated at a park in Lakewood, near her desk job at Camp Murray. 

“Would you describe yourself as evangelical? Yes. If I had to choose I’d probably say Tea Party-ish. Although Tea Party values are in our platform. So, Libertarian? Maybe a little.”

Barbara Hagstrom of Duvall shows off her Trump t-shirt at the 5th Legislative District GOP Caucus.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

It’s not at all clear who will win the Republican primary in Washington state next month —Donald Trump, Ted Cruz or John Kasich.

In this Jan. 26, 2015, file photo, Scott Smith, a supporter of open carry gun laws, wears a pistol as he prepares for a rally in support of open carry gun laws at the Capitol, in Austin, Texas.
AP Photo/Eric Gay, File

Bill Radke talks with Spokane blogger Jim Ryan about why he started a satirical online petition to allow people to openly carry firearms at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland this July.

If someone tells you the same thing five times, you probably should believe he means it.

Back in August, Donald Trump and all the other Republican candidates were given the chance to say they would pledge support to whomever the Republican nominee would be — and not wage an independent bid for the presidency if he or she didn't win.

Federal appeals court judge Merrick Garland headed to Capitol Hill Thursday afternoon to meet with senators, beginning the traditional ritual of any nominee to the Supreme Court.

But for the former prosecutor, the exercise could be in vain. Senate Republicans are holding steadfast in their refusal to even consider Garland's nomination to succeed the late Justice Antonin Scalia, who died unexpectedly last month.

Federal appeals court judge Merrick Garland walks with President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden from the Oval Office to the Rose Garden to be introduced as Obama’s nominee for the Supreme Court at the White House, Wed., March 16, 2016.
AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Audio Pending...

The big news of the day is President Obama's nomination of Judge Merrick Garland to the U.S. Supreme Court. Bill Radke talks about the nomination with Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal, Washington U.S. Senate candidate Chris Vance and current Washington U.S. Senator Patty Murray.

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio announced Tuesday night that he was suspending his campaign for president after losing his home state in a landslide to Donald Trump.

"After tonight it is clear that while we are on the right side, we will not be on the winning side," Rubio told supporters in Miami.

Rubio congratulated Donald Trump at the start of his speech, but later appeared to criticize the real estate mogul's tactics.

Sen. Ted Cruz won the Idaho Republican presidential primary. Cruz pulled in about 45 percent of the GOP vote Tuesday followed by businessman Donald Trump in a distant second place with 28 percent.

Idaho State Treasurer Ron Crane served as Ted Cruz’s honorary state chairman. Crane said Cruz’s values aligned with Idaho’s GOP electorate.

“He connected with Idahoans,” Crane said. “I think his visit to Idaho this last weekend was strategic. His timing was perfect.”

Idaho is one of four states with presidential primaries or caucuses Tuesday. Turnout could be high in the Republican primary if it’s like the others this season.

"I will not compromise away your religious liberty."

That was the vow Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz made to supporters in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho as he campaigned Saturday at the Kootenai County Fairgrounds.

Florida Senator Marco Rubio appealed to Idahoans to revive his presidential hopes during a one-day campaign swing through Idaho Falls and Boise Sunday. Idaho’s Republican presidential primary takes place Tuesday.

Marco Rubio has won the Puerto Rico's Republican primary and will net all of its 23 delegates.

With all votes reporting, the Florida senator took 71 percent of the vote, followed by Donald Trump at 13 percent, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz at 9 percent and Ohio Gov. John Kasich with just 1 percent.

Because Rubio topped 50 percent of the vote, he will net all 23 delegates up for grabs.

Republican Ben Carson confirmed during his speech at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference that he is ending his bid for the White House.

The famed neurosurgeon had implied he was dropping out on Wednesday after a disappointing Super Tuesday finish, and he skipped Thursday night's debate in his hometown of Detroit.

Will Washington Republicans Back Trump?

Mar 2, 2016
President Donald Trump
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Bill Radke speaks with two members of Washington's Republican Party. First, state Rep. Matt Manweller (Ellensburg) explains why he doesn't support Donald Trump for the presidential nominee and doesn't think other GOP leaders will either. On the flip side is state Sen. Doug Ericksen (Ferndale), who said that Trump has an appeal that goes beyond Republicanism. 

Donald Trump picked up his first congressional endorsements this week, and today he scored another major backer: one of his former rivals, Chris Christie.

"I've gotten to know all the people on that stage. And there is no one who is better prepared to provide America with the strong leadership that it needs, both at home and around the world, than Donald Trump," the New Jersey governor said at a news conference in Fort Worth, Texas.

In the aftermath of last Friday's vote by the Republican-led Washington Senate not to confirm Secretary of Transportation Lynn Peterson, essentially firing her on the spot, an email went out to all staff at the Department of Transportation.

A voter marks a ballot for the New Hampshire primary inside a voting booth at a polling place Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016, in Manchester, N.H.
AP Photo/David Goldman

Bill Radke asks Marilyn McKenna why she thinks Seattle women should consider voting Republican in 2016. For further listening, check out this discussion Radke hosted yesterday concerning the Democratic candidates: Debate: Do Feminists Have To Vote For Hilary?

Carly Fiorina is exiting the Republican presidential race after a seventh-place showing in last night's New Hampshire primary.

"While I suspend my candidacy today, I will continue to travel this country and fight for those Americans who refuse to settle for the way things are and a status quo that no longer works for them," said Fiorina in a statement.

Bill Radke speaks with Chris Osterhaug about why he wants Donald Trump to be the next U.S. president. Osterhaug is a Republican from Edmonds. He started the Facebook group Washington State For Donald Trump 2016.

It was a Donald Trump moment straight out of The Apprentice.

Last Friday, the Republican-led Washington state Senate effectively said, "You're fired" to Secretary of Transportation Lynn Peterson.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee has cancelled a series of regularly scheduled meetings with the Republican leader of the state Senate. The move follows Friday’s surprise vote by Senate Republicans to oust Inslee’s Secretary of Transportation.

Get Caught Up:

  1. In the Trump-less debate, arrows were shot at Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, who was center stage. He complained Fox News was trying to goad his rivals to attack him, taking on a Trump-ian line. The sharpest elbows were thrown between Cruz and Rubio over immigration after Fox News showed past clips of each of them espousing different views and having to defend whether or not they were opposed to legalization for immigrants in the country illegally.

Bill Radke speaks with Susan Hutchison, chairman of the Washington State Republican Party, about voters' feelings on the economy as we head into the 2016 election year. She said there's a difference between those who live in downtown Seattle -- who have a sense that the engine is roaring due to Amazon -- and those who live in smaller cities or Eastern Washington. 

Thursday's main Republican debate airs on Fox Business Network beginning at 9 p.m. EST.

The Republican presidential hopefuls debate in Las Vegas Tuesday night will be the first since the terrorist attacks in Paris and in San Bernardino, Calif. In recent weeks, ISIS and how to keep Americans safe have dominated the campaign and shot to the top of Americans' concerns.

Donald Trump has faced a torrent of criticism after releasing a policy proposal that would ban all Muslims from entering the United States.

The latest pronouncement from the presidential campaign of Donald Trump calls for the U.S. to refuse to let any Muslim — from anywhere — into the United States.

It has prompted very strong criticism, including from some of his fellow Republican candidates and state party leaders.

The Philadelphia Daily News cover Tuesday morning labels Trump "The New Furor."

Trump's proposal came the day after President Obama's Sunday night televised address from the Oval Office in which the president urged Americans to reject discrimination against Muslim Americans.

At every turn, this year's presidential campaign has proved conventional wisdom wrong. The aftermath of the Paris attacks might be another example.

As soon as the attacks were over, a chorus of (establishment) Republican voices predicted that the new focus on national security and terrorism would change the dynamic of the Republican race. This was the tipping point, they declared, that would finally usher out the outsiders leading the polls — Donald Trump and Ben Carson — in favor of more serious, experienced candidates.

This post was updated at 6:30 p.m.

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal suspended his campaign for the Republican nomination for president on Tuesday, saying he had "come to the realization that this is not my time."

The son of Indian immigrants, Jindal said that when his parents came to the United States 45 years ago, they told him he could accomplish anything in this country. But ultimately this time, his dreams of the White House fell short.

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