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Republican Party

Washington state Republican delegate Eric Minor says he will not be voting for Donald Trump in November.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Pandemonium. That’s what broke out on the floor of the Republican National Convention on Monday as a group of delegates tried to derail Donald Trump’s nomination.

It all came down to rules. Getting delegates to pass the rules set out for the convention is usually a formality. But in Cleveland, there was a rebellion.

Republicans have officially nominated Donald Trump as their presidential nominee, with his home state of New York putting him over the top.

Donald Trump's campaign is making no apologies for language in Melania Trump's Monday night convention speech that was near-identical to a similar speech Michelle Obama delivered in 2008.

"From a young age, my parents impressed on me the values that you work hard for what you want in life. That your word is your bond and you do what you say and keep your promise," Trump said in one of the similar passages. "That you treat people with respect."

National security was front and center during the Republican National Convention's first night of programming.

Speaker after speaker bashed President Obama and his former secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, for the Obama administration's approach to fighting ISIS, immigration policies, and the 2012 attacks on diplomatic compounds in Benghazi, Libya.

Here are the facts and context behind several high-profile claims in Monday's speeches.

Delegates react as some delegates call for a roll call vote on the adoption of the rules during the opening day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Monday, July 18, 2016.
AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill

David Hyde speaks to Braedon Wilkerson, a Washington state delegate from Olympia at the Republican National Convention.   

A push by anti-Trump delegates to change the rules of the Republican National Convention failed Monday. Delegates wanted to be free to vote for any candidate in Cleveland. 

Washington delegate Hossein Khorram is a supporter of Donald Trump.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

The Republican National Convention kicked off in Cleveland Monday. As protesters (one in a bear suit despite the hot weather) demonstrated outside, on the floor of the event another demonstration developed.

Chaos erupted on the floor on the first day of the Republican National Committee in Cleveland, as forces opposed to Donald Trump tried — and failed — to make one last stand.

Arkansas Rep. Steve Womack brought up the Rules Committee report, which would keep delegates bound to Trump. Anti-Trump forces began shouting and wanting a roll call vote in a last-ditch effort to unbind GOP delegates and let them vote their "conscience."

Conventions give candidates a second chance to make a first impression, even candidates who have been covered by the media as obsessively as Donald Trump.

The Republican convention in Cleveland gives Trump that chance. Here are six things to watch this week:

1. Will the Cleveland convention stick to a script?

Presidential candidate Donald Trump, pictured here 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e41ELr

Donald J. Trump is the presumptive Republican nominee. "We will have so much winning if I get elected, that you will get bored with winning... believe me," he said in a speech.

But an eleventh-hour battle is raging behind the scenes that could deny Trump the Republican nomination.  And some members of Washington State's delegation are playing a big role.  

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

Homemakers and entrepreneurs, farmers and retirees: What unites them? These are some of the most frequently-held occupations among Republican donors in Washington state.

On Thursday, June 30, KUOW is hosting an event in Bellevue where we hope to bring Washington state Republicans together to discuss the present and future of their party.

It's no secret that Donald Trump has struggled to win over female voters. Polls show more than 60 percent of women have an unfavorable opinion of the presumptive Republican nominee.

But, as the campaign pivots to the general election, are Republican women reconsidering Trump? It's this group of largely white women Trump needs in November.

House Speaker Paul Ryan shot down reports Wednesday that he was on the verge of endorsing Donald Trump for president.

Len Liendsley gets his space set up outside the TRAC Convention Center in Pasco, site of the state Republican convention. 'I just love the party. ... not totally in love with it this year,' he says.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Emily Fox talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about what happened at the Washington state GOP convention in Pasco over the weekend.

Dr. Esther Hunte wore a red Ted Cruz t-shirt to the Washington Republican Convention in Pasco Friday. She isn’t sure she can support the candidacy of her party’s apparent presidential nominee, Donald Trump. Her choices, as she sees them?

"Either leaving the presidential one blank or voting for a third party," Hunte said. "Depends on who's on the ballot."

Katja Delavar rode her American-made Victory motorcycle to Pasco from Vancouver, Wash., for the state Republican convention.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Katja Delavar may not fit your image of a Washington-state Republican.

There’s the purple-and-black motorcycle and her helmet with the long, purple braid of fake hair flying out the back.

Washington Republicans will meet in the Tri-Cities Friday to select delegates to this summer’s national convention in Cleveland. They are describing this year’s presidential campaign as “a Reagan restart” and “an outsider’s election.”

Presidential candidate Donald Trump, pictured here 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e41ELr

If you're a Republican, you may gotten your ballot and thought to yourself, "Why bother filling that out? I mean, Donald Trump is the last candidate standing. He's assured of getting the nomination, right?"


Presidential candidate Donald Trump, pictured here 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e41ELr

Donald Trump is the apparent GOP nominee. And here in Washington state, Republicans are deeply divided about the pick and uncertain about the future of the party. 

Trump and his supporters are triumphant, but the reaction among some Washington state Republicans is a lot less enthusiastic, like former Attorney General Rob McKenna.

Kasich, Cruz or Trump? Which candidate will win later this month?
From left: AP Photos/Evan Vucci, Jacquelyn Martin, and Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Ballots will go out at the end of this week for this year’s presidential primary, and all eyes are on the state’s Republicans. Their vote will decide how the state’s 44 GOP delegates will be apportioned.

With the GOP contest still undecided, the state’s Republicans may have a rare chance to influence the nomination.

In this March 10, 2016, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Ohio Gov. John Kasich, right, speaks as Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, listens, during a Republican presidential debate.
AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File

Governor John Kasich and Senator Ted Cruz have joined forces to try and stop Donald Trump, sort of. 

They've struck a deal to not compete in three states: Kasich will not campaign in Indiana and Cruz will not campaign in New Mexico or Oregon. But the truce ends at the Washington state line.

Oregon's Republican presidential primary is taking on a new look. The Ted Cruz campaign said the Texas senator will stand down in Oregon to clear a path for Ohio Governor John Kasich. The Cruz campaign will also pull back its efforts in New Mexico.

In return, the Kasich camp will back off in Indiana.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich picked up some endorsements in Washington state, but he distantly trails the front-runners in the race for the GOP nomination.
Courtesy John Kasich campaign

Ohio Governor John Kasich is getting some love from Republican leaders heading into next month's presidential primary here in Washington state.

Kerry French at American Lake in Lakewood. She's campaigning for Sen. Ted Cruz in Pierce County.
KUOW PHOTO/Amy Radil

Kerry French, a Republican leader in Pierce County, campaigns for Ted Cruz, the presidential candidate, with a smart phone app.

Users earn “points” as they give information and get the word out. First comes a brief survey, which French demonstrated at a park in Lakewood, near her desk job at Camp Murray. 

“Would you describe yourself as evangelical? Yes. If I had to choose I’d probably say Tea Party-ish. Although Tea Party values are in our platform. So, Libertarian? Maybe a little.”

Barbara Hagstrom of Duvall shows off her Trump t-shirt at the 5th Legislative District GOP Caucus.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

It’s not at all clear who will win the Republican primary in Washington state next month —Donald Trump, Ted Cruz or John Kasich.

In this Jan. 26, 2015, file photo, Scott Smith, a supporter of open carry gun laws, wears a pistol as he prepares for a rally in support of open carry gun laws at the Capitol, in Austin, Texas.
AP Photo/Eric Gay, File

Bill Radke talks with Spokane blogger Jim Ryan about why he started a satirical online petition to allow people to openly carry firearms at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland this July.

If someone tells you the same thing five times, you probably should believe he means it.

Back in August, Donald Trump and all the other Republican candidates were given the chance to say they would pledge support to whomever the Republican nominee would be — and not wage an independent bid for the presidency if he or she didn't win.

Federal appeals court judge Merrick Garland headed to Capitol Hill Thursday afternoon to meet with senators, beginning the traditional ritual of any nominee to the Supreme Court.

But for the former prosecutor, the exercise could be in vain. Senate Republicans are holding steadfast in their refusal to even consider Garland's nomination to succeed the late Justice Antonin Scalia, who died unexpectedly last month.

Federal appeals court judge Merrick Garland walks with President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden from the Oval Office to the Rose Garden to be introduced as Obama’s nominee for the Supreme Court at the White House, Wed., March 16, 2016.
AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Audio Pending...

The big news of the day is President Obama's nomination of Judge Merrick Garland to the U.S. Supreme Court. Bill Radke talks about the nomination with Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal, Washington U.S. Senate candidate Chris Vance and current Washington U.S. Senator Patty Murray.

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio announced Tuesday night that he was suspending his campaign for president after losing his home state in a landslide to Donald Trump.

"After tonight it is clear that while we are on the right side, we will not be on the winning side," Rubio told supporters in Miami.

Rubio congratulated Donald Trump at the start of his speech, but later appeared to criticize the real estate mogul's tactics.

Sen. Ted Cruz won the Idaho Republican presidential primary. Cruz pulled in about 45 percent of the GOP vote Tuesday followed by businessman Donald Trump in a distant second place with 28 percent.

Idaho State Treasurer Ron Crane served as Ted Cruz’s honorary state chairman. Crane said Cruz’s values aligned with Idaho’s GOP electorate.

“He connected with Idahoans,” Crane said. “I think his visit to Idaho this last weekend was strategic. His timing was perfect.”

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