Republican Party | KUOW News and Information

Republican Party

As Republican notables denounce or distance themselves from Donald Trump in the wake of his latest controversy, the world watches and asks, "Why now?"

Put another way: Why is this incident different? What is it about this latest evidence of Trump's nature and views that's truly more unacceptable than all the preceding information on the subject? How can the Republican nominee, who has been his party's front-runner for nearly a year, suddenly be regarded as utterly beyond the pale?

Can you see them?
Google Earth

The most Republican block in Seattle is at 116 Fairview Avenue North in South Lake Union.

It’s the site of a large, upscale retirement community called Mirabella. Nothing outside screams Republican – no Trump hats or “Hillary for Prison in 2016.” 

Republicans and Democrats have moved further and further from each other over the last few decades. The result has been gridlock and partisan vitriol like many Americans have never seen in their lifetimes.

As it turns out, it's not just about beliefs: according to a new report from the Pew Research Center, "the two parties look less alike today than at any point over the last quarter-century."

Zaki Barak Hamid, Sam Reed, Matthew Manweller, Ross Reynolds, Diane Tebelius and Slade Gordon.
KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

He came. He saw. He won the nomination. What does Donald Trump’s unique form of Republicanism mean for the party faithful in our state?

KUOW and Humanities Washington invited a panel of GOP standard bearers to discuss that and other long-range questions as this election cycle draws to a close. Is Trumpism a blip on the radar for the party of Lincoln, or the way of the future?

Listen to the panel discussion below.

Governor Jay Inslee.
Flickr Photo/GovInslee (CC-BY-NC-ND)

A new poll out this week shows incumbent Jay Inslee with a big lead over challenger Bill Bryant in the battle for the Washington governor’s office.

But Bryant made some news too: He said he wouldn’t vote for fellow Republican Donald Trump.

It’s been 18 years since Republicans last controlled both chambers of the Washington legislature. They’re hoping 2016 is the year they can reclaim the majority. But that will require holding on to their narrow grip on the state Senate and flipping the Washington House -- something Democrats are determined not to let happen.

Washington Republicans are working hard this election cycle to hold onto their slim majority in the state Senate. And they’re getting some help from a new political action committee set up by the debt collection industry.

Washington delegate Hossein Khorram is a supporter of Donald Trump.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Bill Radke speaks with Hossein Khorram about why he continues to support Donald Trump, despite other Republicans in the region backing out of a Trump fundraiser planned for the Seattle area later this month. 

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump plans to return to Washington and Oregon at the end this month. The Washington Post reports Trump will hold high dollar fundraisers in Portland and Seattle as part of a west coast swing. He’s also expected to hold public events.

Some party loyalists are scrambling to try to course correct Donald Trump's erratic presidential campaign after the nominee suffered a startling number of self-inflicted campaign wounds in just the kick-off week of the general election race.

President Obama reiterated that he believes Donald Trump is "unfit" to be president, issuing a sharp rebuke of the Republican nominee from the White House East Room on Tuesday.

"Yes, I think the Republican nominee is unfit to serve as president," Obama said in response to a question from a reporter during a news conference with Lee Hsien Loong, the prime minister of Singapore. "I said so last week, and he keeps on proving it."

Bill Radke talks to University of Washington history professor Margaret O'Mara about unity at the Democratic and Republican National Conventions and how the elections of the past compare to the 2016 conventions. 

One of the stickers for sale at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

The Republican National Convention wrapped up last night with Donald Trump accepting the party's presidential nomination.

KUOW's David Hyde and Matt Martin were in Cleveland all week, covering Washington state's delegation.

Here are some of the voices they heard, produced by Kate Walters and Andy Hurst.

Washington state's delegates are split on Donald Trump's candidacy -- and his rhetoric.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/

This year the Republican presidential nominee has divided the country – and his own party – as much as any nominee in over 40 years.

And much of that has do with his choice of words. 

Washington state's Cruz supporters pose at the Republican National Convention. Reporter David Hyde said some have not transferred their allegiance to Donald Trump.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Deborah Wang speaks with David Hyde at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland about the Ted Cruz speech that made waves last night because it failed to endorse nominee Donald Trump.

Hyde tells us how the Washington state delegation reacted to Cruz's call for people to vote their conscience.