Barbara Ehrenreich Talks 'Living With A Wild God'

May 8, 2014
Barbara Ehrenreich's book "Living With a Wild God."

Barbara Ehrenreich is a journalist and activist known for her wry, acerbic, probing and prolific writings. She writes essays and articles related to social injustice and books on subjects she says don’t make money but fascinate her.

In 2001, Ehrenreich was undergoing breast cancer treatment and putting her papers in order simultaneously. She calls the timing “viciously appropriate.”

Among the many boxes from a lifetime of writing she re-discovered a journal she’d kept as an adolescent. Moved by the questions she found there — "Why are we here? What’s going on in the universe? What is all this about?" — she promised to try to better understand her youthful experience if she recovered.

The result is her latest book, "Living with a Wild God: A Nonbeliever’s Search for the Truth about Everything." She calls it a “sort of philosophical memoir, or a metaphysical thriller.”

Ehrenreich spoke with KUOW’s Marcie Sillman at Town Hall Seattle on April 21.

Flickr Photo/Wally Gobetz

Marcie Sillman talks with Dahlia Lithwick, Slate law writer, about the Supreme Court's ruling Monday that allows for prayers before local council meetings. She also speaks with Clark County Commissioner Tom Mielke, who implemented prayer in his own meetings.

Krista Bremer's memoir, "My Accidental Jihad."

Marcie Sillman talks with author Krista Bremer about her memoir, "My Accidental Jihad." In it Bremer reflects on her marriage to a Libyan-born Muslim and the challenges she faced in a multicultural family.

Flickr Photo/University of Denver (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Rabbi Ted Falcon, Pastor Don Mackenzie and Imam Jamal Rahman about how to engage in a successful interfaith dialogue.

The Passover Seder is usually described as a ceremonial meal: Participants sit down to a set of ritualized foods and tell the story of the exodus from Egypt. But more than just tell it, Jews are bidden to relive it. We engage in ritual and discussion and debate, until each of us feels that we've made a journey ourselves. It's a singular, time-stopping evening. But it can take a very long time.

The intrepid tourist who visits the market in the border city of Matamoros will find her between the onyx chess sets and Yucateca hammocks. She looks like a statue of the Grim Reaper dressed in a flowing gown. She is Santa Muerte, or Saint Death.

Originally revered as an underground folk saint in Mexico, her popularity has jumped the Rio Grande and spread to Mexican communities throughout the United States.

Leah Vincent was born into the Yeshivish community, an ultra-Orthodox sect of Judaism, in Pittsburgh.

"Yeshivish Judaism life is defined by religious law," Vincent tells NPR's Arun Rath. "We keep extra-strict laws of kosher, observe the Sabbath every week, maintain a separation of the sexes and a degree of isolation from the outside world."

When she was 16, she was caught exchanging letters with a male friend. Contact with men is forbidden in her sect, and she was cast out from her community.

Flickr Photo/Jeff Nickel (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Pastor Don Mackenzie, Rabbi Ted Falcon and Imam Jamal Rahman of the Three Interfaith Amigos about spirituality and sports.

Flickr Photo/SalFalko (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Religious institutions in Washington have previously been exempt from discrimination rules but that could be changing. The Washington Supreme Court said in decisions Thursday that some employees whose duties are non-religious can bring discrimination claims against these nonprofits.

Christian Scientists who treat their sick children with faith healing, instead of medical care, have special protection under Washington law. But that could soon change.

Courtesy of Rafe Pearlman

Rafe Pearlman came into his music career 20 years ago, right when grunge was capturing the world's attention. He didn’t have a meteoric rise to the top, but the singer-songwriter is still moving forward, selling out local shows where he mixes rock music with the chanting of many faiths.

Flickr Photo/Henry Alva

Pacific Medical Centers said Monday it plans to team with Providence Health and Services, the latest example of health care providers aligning with religious organizations.

Flickr Photo/

Mary Dispenza came out of the closet more than 20 years ago. At the time, the former nun was directing pastoral nun services at the Seattle Archdiocese. Once Mary came out as gay, the church wouldn’t let her keep her position for long. Dispenza said that watching the gay vice principal of Eastside Catholic High School has been painful, and, after 20 years, a little too close to home for comfort.

Why Ridwan, 16, Pretended He Was Allergic to Pork

Jan 3, 2014
KUOW Photo/Iman Mohamed

"I walked up to them and they were playing basketball, doing their normal stuff like we usually do. And I told them that I wanted to talk to them."

That was the day that 16-year-old Ridwan Abdirahman told his friends that he was a Muslim after two-and-a-half years of keeping that part of himself hidden.

Amid Protests Of Vice Principal's Resignation, Youth Mark Changing Catholic Church

Dec 20, 2013
Flickr Photo/

David Hyde talks with Seattle PI columnist Joel Connelly about changing attitudes towards same-sex marriage in the Catholic church.