religion and faith | KUOW News and Information

religion and faith

President Obama delivered remarks at a mosque in Baltimore on Wednesday afternoon, in the first visit to an American mosque he's made during his presidency.

His visit, which also included a roundtable with Muslim community members, ws intended to "reaffirm the importance of religious freedom" to life in America, the White House says.

He opened by thanking Muslim-Americans for their service to their communities, before declaring the importance of religious tolerance in America.

The Record: Thursday, Jan. 28, Full Show

Jan 28, 2016
studio record
KUOW Photo

Why is Seattle spending $50 million to address a homeless crisis that gets worse? The mayor says the city's many, many nonprofits are well-meaning, but wasteful.

Also, the federal government is demanding some of its military surplus back from Washington state.

And how much worse can Catholic Church sexual abuse be? Ask Native Americans.

Listen to the full show above, or check out the individual stories:

Abusive Priests On Indian Reservations Leave ‘Profound Wound’

Jan 28, 2016
Attorney Vito De La Cruz in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Until the 1960s, Catholic boarding schools forcibly took Native American children from their families.

The rise of ISIS and other Muslim extremist groups in the Middle East, Africa and South Asia has brought horrific persecution of non-Muslims — Christians, Jews and other religious minorities. Now, a group of Islamic scholars, Muslim leaders and government ministers from Muslim-majority countries has promised to work together to protect those minorities, saying Islam forbids religious persecution.

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Seattle's mayor says homelessness is dividing the city into two overheated, unrealistic conversations. He'll tell you the solutions that he calls "reality-based." 

A Seattle animal researcher will tell you why she wants your vacation photos -- yes, even your iPhone snapshots can help her.

And a survivor of rape at a Seattle Catholic school wants to know why his attacker was not on that list released by the Seattle Archdiocese.

Listen to the full show above or check out the individual stories:

'Week in Review' panel Knute Berger, Rob McKenna, classy Bill Radke and Lesley Hazleton.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Tent camps, car camps – is Seattle solving homelessness or attracting it? Do you trust Seattle’s Catholic Church anymore? And, in our forward-thinking frontier town, how much should you observe the rules of etiquette? Bill Radke chews the news (with mouth closed) together with author Lesley Hazleton, Crosscut's Knute Berger and former attorney general Rob McKenna.

Tuesday was an important holiday in the Russian Orthodox Church: Epiphany, which celebrates the baptism of Jesus in the River Jordan.

Russian believers mark the event by re-enacting that baptism in ponds and rivers, and since Russia is far north of the Jordan, that means plunging into freezing water through holes cut in the ice.

Big cities like Moscow often set up elaborate stations where people can take the plunge, but people in other cities go for the do-it-yourself approach.

The Record: Tuesday, Jan. 19, Full Show

Jan 19, 2016
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KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Today on The Record: The Catholic Church of Seattle has released the names of clergy and church workers accused of sexually abusing young people. We'll get reaction from someone who says as a child, she was abused by her priest. Also, should Seattle let people who have no other home park their RVs along the street? And what's wrong with you saying "the" Puget Sound?

Listen to the full show above, or check out the individual stories:

Michael J. Cody
BishopAccountability.org

When the Seattle Archdiocese released names of 77 abusive clergy last week, many Catholics heralded a new era of transparency.

Michael J. Cody
BishopAccountability.org

The Archdiocese of Seattle on Friday named 77 Catholic clergy or religious order members accused of sexually abusing minors.

Those on the list served or lived in Western Washington between 1923 and 2008, the archdiocese said in a statement. The list includes names of priests that haven’t been disclosed publicly before.  

A debate is raging in France over whether Jewish men should avoid wearing the traditional yarmulke, so as not to identify themselves at a time of increasing violence by young radical Islamists. The proposal was put forth this week by a Jewish leader in Marseille, following a knife attack on a local Jewish teacher.

Zvi Ammar, head of Marseille's 60,000-strong Jewish community, suggested it might be better if Jews in Marseille stopped wearing the yarmulke, also known as a kippah.

"For the time being," Ammar said, "at least until these barbarians calm down."

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Manny Diaz/Arise Chicago 

Larycia Hawkins urges her students to reach beyond academics by living out their beliefs in the real world. Now, she might lose her job for practicing what she preaches in the classroom. 

Hawkins is a 43-year-old political science professor at Wheaton College in Illinois (not to be confused with the Wheaton College in Norton, MA). She has been teaching at the private evangelical Christian school for nine years and she has academic tenure. 

Courtesy ACT Theatre

Ayad Akhtar is one of those guys you'd hate if he wasn't so likeable.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright is an award-winning screenwriter, a critically-acclaimed novelist, an actor and a teacher. And he's only 43 years old.

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Courtesy Christanne Boudreau

What leads a young person, living what seems to be a "normal everyday life" in the West, to join an extremist group?

And what can you do to bring them back? 

The BBC talked with one young British woman who was recently contacted by ISIS recruiters. She preferred not to use her name, but she did talk about what first got her interested in groups others might view as radical.  

It was the news about three teenage girls, gifted students in east London who slipped away in February to join ISIS.

The view from Harbor West condominium in West Seattle.
Courtesy of Finn Raftery

A new study says beautiful places like King County have so many people who claim to be nones -- having no religion -- because the natural world provides a "spiritual resource." Ross Reynolds speaks with Todd Ferguson, co-author with Jeffrey Tamborello, about their finding that counties with high levels of natural amenities also have low rates of religious adherence

This segment originally aired Sept. 4, 2015.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

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 REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic

In a show of solidarity, a group of Kenyan Muslims came to the defense of a group of Kenyan Christians when the bus they were riding in was hijacked by members of an Islamic militant group, al-Shabab.  

The passengers were traveling from Nairobi to the northeastern town of Mandera, near the border with Somalia, when the militants started shooting at the bus.   

The attackers were trying to separate the Muslims from the Christians, intending to kill the non-Muslims. 

The attack that killed 14 people in San Bernardino, Calif., earlier this month raised the alarm over so-called homegrown terrorism, attacks that aren't necessarily coordinated from overseas.

A few days after the massacre, FBI Director James Comey described the challenges of detecting those threats in a hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Here's what we've heard about evangelical voters lately: Donald Trump, Ben Carson, and now Ted Cruz are fighting for them. Cruz says that a bunch of them are "missing" (and that he's the man to find them). And anyone will tell you that they play a decisive role in Iowa GOP caucuses.

'Week in Review' panel Bill Radke, Joni Balter, Paul Guppy and Pramila Jayapal.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Does Star Wars teach kids that people are either good or bad, dark or light? Do college students need to toughen their skins? Can we make a football coach pray alone? Can Santa be a woman?

Bill Radke solves this week’s dilemmas with state Senator Pramila Jayapal, Seattle Channel's Joni Balter and Washington Policy Center's Paul Guppy.

Mother Teresa of Calcutta, who devoted herself to helping the poor, will be canonized as a saint, after Pope Francis issued a decree attributing a second miracle to the founder of the Missionaries of Charity. Mother Teresa won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979.

A mosque, a church and a synagogue go up on the site of an old Jewish country club ...

It sounds like the setup to a joke — but it's not. It's actually happening in Omaha, Neb. The Tri-Faith Initiative may be the first place in history where these three monotheistic faiths have built together, on purpose, with the intention of working together.

The project has inspired some, and antagonized others.

Terrorism and economic woes may be big concerns, but Republican candidate Ted Cruz sees another issue dominating the presidential race.

"I'm convinced 2016 will be a religious liberty election," he said in a recent interview.

Cruz says religious people, devout Christians in particular, are routinely marginalized and harassed for their beliefs, and that such treatment has gotten worse under the Obama administration.

People rally on Capitol Hill in December in memory of Hamza Warsame, a 16-year-old Somali American who died in a fall from an apartment building.
Alex Garland

The sister of a Somali-American teen killed in a fall on Seattle’s Capitol Hill is asking the city’s Muslim community for patience as police investigate.

Hundreds of people unfazed by rain gathered Thursday night for a second day to raise awareness about the death of Hamza Warsame.

President Obama's request that American Muslims help "root out" and confront extremist ideology in their communities is getting mixed reactions. Muslim leaders say they want to help, but some are not happy that they are being singled out.

A Google map shows the outline of the North Seattle eruv.
KUOW Staff

After the sun sets on Fridays, Orthodox Jews may not push a stroller. Nor may they carry tissues or books outside their homes.

But there’s a loophole: People who live within certain neighborhood boundaries may carry books and babies outside.

Aliya, Batoul and Amina Al-Sadi. Aliya Al-Sadi, a student at the University of Washington, spoke with her older sister Amina, a KUOW producer, about how she processed the San Bernardino shootings.
Courtesy of Amina Al-Sadi

After the deadly shooting in San Bernardino, California last week Muslims across the country held their breath.

Was the shooter a Muslim? They hoped not.

As yet another mass shooting claimed the lives of 14 people Wednesday in San Bernardino, Calif., a familiar refrain echoed from the lips of politicians: Pray.

But for many fed up with the now seemingly routine shootings and the resulting inaction from each over how to stop another tragedy, pleas to God weren't enough anymore.

Jewish and Christian leaders are urging elected officials to show compassion to refugees, amidst public debate over allowing Syrian refugees into the country.

A letter released on Wednesday by several leading evangelical Christian churches and other groups calls on elected officials to show "compassion and hospitality" to refugees fleeing violence.

The Pilgrims are among the early heroes of American history, celebrated every Thanksgiving for their perseverance in the New World against great odds.

To Christian conservatives, they are role models for another reason as well: They were deeply committed to their Christian faith and not afraid to say so.

In the Mayflower Compact, the governing document signed shortly before the Pilgrims disembarked in Massachusetts' Provincetown Harbor, Pilgrim leaders said they undertook their voyage across the Atlantic "for the glory of God and the advancement of the Christian faith."

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