religion and faith | KUOW News and Information

religion and faith

Flickr Photo/WarzauWynn (CC BY-NC 2.0) http://bit.ly/2e4FXO7

A little girl went home in tears recently: She had been called "a Trump" at her school in Seattle.

A first-grade boy, the son of a KUOW employee, asked his mother if his Muslim classmates would have to move away if Donald Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, were elected.


KUOW photo/Liz Jones

A King County jury has found a Bellevue man not guilty of threatening a local Muslim woman with a gun. Advocates had called the incident a “hate attack” and pushed for authorities to investigate. 


Researchers seeking to predict how Americans will vote have for years identified an important clue: The more religious you are, the more likely you are to lean Republican.

Conversations with more than two-dozen self-identified "faith" voters in Boone, N.C., suggest that pattern is holding this year, even while revealing the same high level of voter disenchantment evident across the country.

UW student Varisha Khan at the Democratic National Convention in July
KUOW PHOTO/David Hyde

Donald Trump has replaced his earlier call for a total ban on Muslims entering the U.S.

Now he demands ideological tests on immigrants. “I call it extreme, extreme vetting,” Trump said in a speech Monday in Ohio.


Coach Joe Kennedy.
Courtesy of First Liberty Institute

Last fall, an assistant football coach at Bremerton High School lost his job for praying on the 50-yard line after games. Now Joe Kennedy is suing to get his job back and to keep a promise he made with God. KUOW's Bill Radke spoke with Kennedy about church, state and the playing field. 

A Satanist group said it’s planning to start after-school clubs at two Washington schools this fall.

The Satanic Temple said it’s bringing the After-School Satan club to schools across the country that now host the evangelical Christian Good News Club, including Centennial Elementary in Mount Vernon and Point Defiance Elementary in Tacoma.


Mohamed Bakr talks with Glenda Johnson (left) at KUOW's Ask a Muslim event on July 24, 2016 at the New Holly Gathering Hall.
KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

Islam is the fastest growing religion in the world today. In 2010, researchers counted 1.6 billion Muslims around the globe; approximately 23 percent of the world population. 

There are 3.3 million Muslims in the United States; approximately 1 percent of our population. In the wake of 9/11, President George Bush said this about Muslim Americans:

After the July 14 terrorist attack in Nice, the French interior minister called on "all willing French patriots" to help defend the country by volunteering for the military's reserves.

Two sisters, Majda and Amina Belaroui, French Muslims of Moroccan heritage, heeded the call in the aftermath of the Bastille Day attack, when a Tunisian truck driver mowed down crowds of spectators, killing 84 and wounding hundreds.

Pastor Drew Yoos is tired of white Christian congregations perpetuating systemic racism.
Flickr Photo/Mars Hill Church (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Drew Yoos is tired of hearing this:

“We’re all a gift from god.”
“Skin color doesn’t matter.”
“Diversity is a gift.”

He’s a pastor in the Bothell-Mill Creek area who believes that many white Christian churches are complicit in perpetuating racism.


Mount Calvary member Vera Brooks greets a newcomer at Sunday service.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

After a week of tragedy and racial tensions, Sunday church services gave people a place to talk about it, especially within black congregations in the Seattle area

KUOW's Liz Jones visited the morning service at Mount Calvary Christian Center in Seattle’s Central District.

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Jeffrey Dubinsky/Reuters
Amanda Saab in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with Amanda Saab about the way anti-Muslim sentiment has had an impact on her day-to-day life and what she wants Seattleites to do about it. 

Monday's bombing in the Saudi city of Medina stands out, even among the wave of terrorist attacks in recent days. It wasn't the death toll. It didn't produce the scenes of carnage like Saturday's bombing in Baghdad that killed nearly 200 people or last week's attack on the airport in Istanbul that left 44 dead.

It was the chosen target — Medina, the site of the Muslim Prophet Muhammad's tomb and his house.

Did war change Guatemala's faith?

Jun 30, 2016
I
Amy Bracken

It’s been 20 years since the official end of Guatemala’s civil war.

The 36-year conflict is generally seen as a military versus guerrilla struggle for power and land, and also a front in the Cold War. But many of the estimated 200,000 people killed were civilians, and massacres of mostly indigenous people led to widespread charges of genocide.

Miguel de León Ceto was born in Nebaj, a town in the hard-hit Maya Ixil highlands, but his family fled to Mexico when he was a baby. When he finally came back, he was a teenager, and there was something that particularly puzzled him.

Aboard a flight home from Armenia, Pope Francis fielded a pointed question from reporters: Did he agree with German Cardinal Reinhard Marx, who, in the wake of the Orlando shooting, said gays deserve an apology from the Church?

His answer was frank.

What Does 'Radical Islam' Mean?

Jun 22, 2016

The tragedy in Orlando has prompted a debate over use of the term “radical Islam.” Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with William McCants of the Brookings Institution about what the words mean, and why they are controversial.

Interview Highlights: William McCants

On the history of the term “radical Islam”

A mourner is comforted during a memorial in Charleston, S.C., Friday, June 17, 2016 on the anniversary of the killing of nine black parishioners during bible study at Mother Emanuel AME Church.
AP Photo/Chuck Burton

Ross Reynolds talks with Rev. Carey Anderson about the one year anniversary of the mass shooting at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, SC. Anderson is senior minister at Seattle's First African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Can comedy reform a swing hater?

Jun 14, 2016
Negin Farsad performs at TEDWomen2015, May 29, 2015.
Flickr Photo/TED Conference (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/sRrmMx

Bill Radke speaks with social justice comedian Negin Farsad about how she believes comedy can change people's negative views of Muslims and other minorities. Her new book is "How To Make White People Laugh." 

Middle school students at the Muslim Association of Puget Sound attend a press conference concerning a recent threat following the Orlando shooting.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

A mosque in Redmond, Washington has added extra security patrols due to a recent threat.  It came just hours after the Orlando shooting.

Redmond police say they received an anonymous call Sunday night. The individual was not making the threat, but passing on information he had overheard.

The Washington National Cathedral says it will remove two images of the Confederate battle flag from the building's stained-glass windows. Then the church will hold a period of public discussion on issues of race, slavery and justice and revisit the question of how to treat other depictions of the Civil War on the windows.

When it comes to the issue of religious rights versus no-cost contraception, the only thing the Supreme Court could agree on was not to decide.

In an unsigned opinion issued Monday, the court sent a series of cases back to a raft of federal appeals courts, with instructions for those courts and the parties in the lawsuits to try harder to work things out. "The Court expresses no view on the merits of the cases," the opinion said.

Pope Francis told a gathering of about 900 heads of women's religious orders that he supports studying whether women can become deacons. The step is seen as a possible turning point for the Roman Catholic Church, which does not allow women to serve in ordained ministry.

At Thursday's meeting of the International Union of Superiors General, Francis was asked why women are not allowed to be deacons and whether he would form an official commission to look into the issue. He responded, "I accept; it would be useful for the church to clarify this question. I agree."

Jeannie Yandel talks to Mukilteo's Mayor Jennifer Gregerson about the reaction to a proposal to build a mosque in the city. 

The proposed mosque in Mukilteo.
Islamic Center of Mulkiteo

The Mukilteo businessman who sent postcards throughout his city, warning about a new mosque now says it was a bad idea. 

On Friday, Pope Francis released a 256-page document called "Amoris Laetitia," or "The Joy of Love." In it, he calls for the Catholic Church to approach issues of sex, marriage, family planning and divorce with less emphasis on dogmatic law and more emphasis on individual conscience.

While the post-synodal apostolic exhortation doesn't directly alter any church doctrine, its shift in tone is significant for Catholic families around the world.

In a major document released Friday, Pope Francis addressed divisive elements of Catholic doctrine — including how to treat couples who remarry after a divorce that wasn't annulled by the church, and the church's stance on contraception.

Without issuing any new top-down doctrine, Francis said that priests should focus on providing pastoral care for Catholic couples, rather than sitting in judgment of them, and that individual conscience should be emphasized, rather than dogmatic rules.

Author Lesley Hazleton at TEDGlobal 2013 in Edinburgh, Scotland.
Flickr Photo/TED Conference (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/eKTSNu

Bill Radke talks with Seattle author Lesley Hazleton about her new book, "Agnostic: A Spirited Manifesto."

Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant has signed a controversial "religious freedom" bill into law.

The legislation, HB 1523, promises that the state government will not punish people who refuse to provide services to people because of a religious opposition to same-sex marriage, extramarital sex or transgender people.

Supporters say it protects the rights of people who are opposed to homosexuality but who now live in a country where same-sex marriage is a legal right.

Opponents say the law amounts to a state sanction for open discrimination.

Captain Simratpal Singh wearing his turban and full beard with his US Army uniform.
Courtesty of Sikh Coalition/Jovelle Tamayo

Bill Radke speaks with Captain Simratpal Singh about the U.S. Army now allowing him to grow a full beard and wear a turban in accordance with his Sikh religion.  Singh graduated from Highline High School in Burien and is a recipient of the Bronze Star. 

This week, Mississippi lawmakers approved a bill called the "Protecting Freedom of Conscience from Government Discrimination Act."

Supporters describe it as a bill protecting religious freedom. Critics call it a sweeping bill giving state sanction to open discrimination against LGBT people.

The legislation, now sitting on the governor's desk, allows state employees to refuse to issue same-sex-marriage licenses and protects private companies and religious groups from being punished for denying a range of services to LGBT people.

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