religion and faith | KUOW News and Information

religion and faith

Hindus and Muslims who have migrated to the United States in recent years are especially well-educated, according to a new survey from the Pew Research Center. On average, Hindus in the U.S. have nearly 16 years of schooling, significantly more than Jews, the next most highly-educated U.S. religious group. Muslim Americans have nearly 14 years of schooling, which is well above the U.S. average.

Pope Francis is calling on those who use and control the media to avoid disinformation and "the sickness of coprophilia" — comparing a love of scandal to an abnormal interest in feces that can also include elements of sexual arousal.

An obsession with scandal can do great harm, Francis said Wednesday, in remarks that also cited people's tendency toward coprophagia (the eating of feces).

When you walk into the Smithsonian's "Art of the Qur'an" exhibition, you're met with a book that weighs 150 pounds. The tome, which dates back to the late-1500s, has giant pages that are covered in gold and black Arabic script.

When it comes to assessing the possible risks and benefits of science and technology, who is the relevant authority?

University scientists? Industry scientists? Religious organizations?

Damage to the sign outside the mosque in Redmond.
Courtesy of MAPS/Abduselam Ibrahim

Bill Radke speaks with Mahmood Khadeer, president of the Muslim Association of Puget Sound, about a sign outside a mosque in Redmond that was damaged in an attack last week. Khadeer shares his reaction to the vandalism and how he wants his community to react to hate. 

Washington Democratic Congresswoman Suzan DelBene
Flickr Photo/Ronald Woan (CC by NC 2.0) / https://flic.kr/p/qihx7g

U.S. Representative Suzan DelBene (D-Wash.) is proposing legislation that would prohibit the federal government from creating a registry of Muslim Americans.

President-elect Donald Trump voiced support for the idea during the campaign, saying it could help guard against domestic terrorism. And the notion has picked up steam recently after a supporter for Trump suggested that such a registry would be legal.

DelBene sees it differently, and tells KUOW that the idea is disturbing.

Stephen Bannon, center left, back, campaign CEO for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, looks on as Trump speaks during a campaign rally on Election Day.
AP Photo/ Evan Vucci

In journalism, we avoid wonk.

Which is why we at KUOW discussed whether to use the term “alt-right.” Mainstream news sites have plugged it into headlines, but our readers and listeners were confused. What does that label even mean?

Pope Francis has declared that abortion, which remains a "grave sin" in the eyes of the Catholic Church, can be absolved by ordinary priests for the foreseeable future — instead of requiring the intervention of a bishop.

The change was implemented on a temporary basis, for one year only, as part of the Catholic Church's "Year of Mercy," which began last December and ended on Sunday.

In a letter released on Monday, the pope announced that the change was being extended indefinitely.

Minidoka Japanese internment camp in Idaho.
Flickr Photo/Samantha Smith (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/Nhc4WG

Bill Radke talks to Tom Ikeda, the director of nonprofit Densho, about his family's experience in the Minidoka internment camps and how he's working to make sure no community in America is interned again.  

The Washington Supreme Court Tuesday heard the case of a florist versus a same-sex couple who wanted flowers for their wedding in 2013. The owner of Arlene’s Flowers in Richland, Washington, refused to take the job, saying it was against her religious beliefs.

Back in 2013, Curt Freed and Robert Ingersoll were engaged to be married. Ingersoll remembers it was on a Friday, his birthday, when he asked the couple's long-time florist, Arlene's Flowers, to do arrangements for their upcoming wedding.

"We had gone to Arlene's for many years and enjoyed her service. She did a great job for us. So it was just natural for us to go there and have her do our flowers," Ingersoll says.

UW student Varisha Khan at the Democratic National Convention in July
KUOW PHOTO/David Hyde

During his campaign, Donald Trump called for a ban on Muslims entering the U.S. because of his concerns about terrorism.

Now that he's the president-elect, Muslims in Seattle are worried for their future.


Hossein Khorram (left) at a Republican viewing party of a presidential debate in Bellevue, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Hebah Fisher

There are about 20,000 self-identified Muslims in Washington state – and some are voting for Trump. 


Bill Radke talks to professor David Domke, chair of  the Department of Communication at the University of Washington, about how racial and religious changes in the country affect elections.

For more than 30 years, conservative evangelical Christians have been tied to the Republican Party. While the pattern seems to be holding this year, with most conservative white Christians supporting Donald Trump, some evangelical leaders are now questioning the logic behind the political alliance.

Pope Francis arrived in Sweden on Monday for services marking the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation that split Lutherans and Catholics.

What The Real Witches Of America Eat

Oct 26, 2016

What do witches eat? If you're thinking of blood and feathers and cauldrons bubbling with eye of newt and toe of frog, you couldn't be more off-menu.

The correct, and disappointingly dull, answer is pizza, bread, fruit, nuts, granola bars, Cornish hens, Dunkin' Donuts, Starbucks coffee, leg of lamb, beer, cheese, Merlot, frozen cheesecake and other supermarket comestibles.

"There isn't a simple answer when it comes to Mormons and Trump," Stephanie Fowers said. "We are so torn right now that hardly anyone I know will even mention his name anymore because it's too depressing."

That makes her just another disenchanted voter in the endless slog that is Campaign 2016. Fowers, a writer from Cottonwood Heights, Utah — and a Mormon — said that among the Mormons she knows, she sees a lot of indecision.

Flickr Photo/WarzauWynn (CC BY-NC 2.0) http://bit.ly/2e4FXO7

A little girl went home in tears recently: She had been called "a Trump" at her school in Seattle.

A first-grade boy, the son of a KUOW employee, asked his mother if his Muslim classmates would have to move away if Donald Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, were elected.


KUOW photo/Liz Jones

A King County jury has found a Bellevue man not guilty of threatening a local Muslim woman with a gun. Advocates had called the incident a “hate attack” and pushed for authorities to investigate. 


Researchers seeking to predict how Americans will vote have for years identified an important clue: The more religious you are, the more likely you are to lean Republican.

Conversations with more than two-dozen self-identified "faith" voters in Boone, N.C., suggest that pattern is holding this year, even while revealing the same high level of voter disenchantment evident across the country.

UW student Varisha Khan at the Democratic National Convention in July
KUOW PHOTO/David Hyde

Donald Trump has replaced his earlier call for a total ban on Muslims entering the U.S.

Now he demands ideological tests on immigrants. “I call it extreme, extreme vetting,” Trump said in a speech Monday in Ohio.


Coach Joe Kennedy.
Courtesy of First Liberty Institute

Last fall, an assistant football coach at Bremerton High School lost his job for praying on the 50-yard line after games. Now Joe Kennedy is suing to get his job back and to keep a promise he made with God. KUOW's Bill Radke spoke with Kennedy about church, state and the playing field. 

A Satanist group said it’s planning to start after-school clubs at two Washington schools this fall.

The Satanic Temple said it’s bringing the After-School Satan club to schools across the country that now host the evangelical Christian Good News Club, including Centennial Elementary in Mount Vernon and Point Defiance Elementary in Tacoma.


Mohamed Bakr talks with Glenda Johnson (left) at KUOW's Ask a Muslim event on July 24, 2016 at the New Holly Gathering Hall.
KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

Islam is the fastest growing religion in the world today. In 2010, researchers counted 1.6 billion Muslims around the globe; approximately 23 percent of the world population. 

There are 3.3 million Muslims in the United States; approximately 1 percent of our population. In the wake of 9/11, President George Bush said this about Muslim Americans:

After the July 14 terrorist attack in Nice, the French interior minister called on "all willing French patriots" to help defend the country by volunteering for the military's reserves.

Two sisters, Majda and Amina Belaroui, French Muslims of Moroccan heritage, heeded the call in the wake of the Bastille Day attack, when a Tunisian truck driver mowed down crowds of spectators, killing 84 and wounding hundreds.

Pastor Drew Yoos is tired of white Christian congregations perpetuating systemic racism.
Flickr Photo/Mars Hill Church (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Drew Yoos is tired of hearing this:

“We’re all a gift from god.”
“Skin color doesn’t matter.”
“Diversity is a gift.”

He’s a pastor in the Bothell-Mill Creek area who believes that many white Christian churches are complicit in perpetuating racism.


Mount Calvary member Vera Brooks greets a newcomer at Sunday service.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

After a week of tragedy and racial tensions, Sunday church services gave people a place to talk about it, especially within black congregations in the Seattle area

KUOW's Liz Jones visited the morning service at Mount Calvary Christian Center in Seattle’s Central District.

R
Jeffrey Dubinsky/Reuters

America is facing a human rights crisis that must be addressed as a matter of urgency. 

That’s the gist of findings by a United Nations investigation into conditions for African Americans. And they were released back in January, long before the deaths of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge and Philando Castile outside of St. Paul. 

Amanda Saab in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with Amanda Saab about the way anti-Muslim sentiment has had an impact on her day-to-day life and what she wants Seattleites to do about it. 

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