Bill Radke talks with Vancovuer Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about Canada's response to the Syrian refugee crisis. President Obama says he wants to admit 10,000 Syrians in the next year, but the Canadian government says it wants to welcome 25,000 Syrian refugees by the end of February. 

The Alhamdan family -- two parents and six children -- arrived recently in Seattle from Syria. They are joining a tiny community of 25 recent Syrian refugees.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

The Washington State Republican Party is accusing Governor Jay Inslee of distorting history when it comes to his open-door policy toward Syrian refugees following the Paris terror attacks.

Inslee has said we should continue slowly resettling Syrian refugees into the U.S. and Washington. To bolster his case, Inslee used the example of Vietnamese refugees who were welcomed here in the 1970s by then-governor Dan Evans.

How right is that comparison? And how should we balance American values in a time of fear?

Bill Radke talks these issues over with Washington state GOP chair Susan Hutchison, former Washington Governor Dan Evans and Democratic Congressman Jim McDermott.

Some Oregon and Washington lawmakers have called for at least a temporary halt to refugee resettlement. They want the federal government to beef up its screening process. But White House officials said in a conference call with reporters Monday that the process is already rigorous.

'Week in Review' panel Joni Balter, Eli Sanders, Knute Berger, Bill Radke and Nick Bond.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Governor Jay Inslee puts Washington at the center of a national debate over Syrian refugees. The FDA says GMO salmon is safe for you and safe for the fish, but will you eat it? And if you're a Democrat but not a socialist, how progressive are you, really?

Bill Radke reviews the week's news with Crosscut's Knute Berger, The Stranger's Eli Sanders, Joni Balter of Seattle Channel's Civic Cocktail and  special guests state climatologist Nick Bond and Council of American-Islamic Relations-Washington executive director Arsalan Bukhari.

Pro-refugee demonstrators disrupted a planned rally at the Washington state Capitol Friday against allowing Syrian refugees into the United States.

Ezra Stoller.

Mayor David Bowers of Roanoke, Virginia, doesn't want any Syrians resettled in his community. He suggested US officials draw inspiration for how to deal with Syrians from how Japanese Americans were treated during World War II. He even lauded the internment camps many Japanese Americans were confined to during the war.

With the news that one of the Paris attackers may have entered Europe posing as a refugee from Syria, more than half of American governors are now objecting to Syrian refugees being resettled in their states. On Tuesday, White House officials hosted a call with 34 governors to better explain current security screening measures. And this week, some members of Congress have called on the Obama administration to stop or at least pause the resettlement program until refugees can be properly vetted.

The Alhamdan family -- two parents and six children -- arrived recently in Seattle from Syria. They are joining a tiny community of 25 recent Syrian refugees.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

The debate about Syrian refugees continues to gain force. And more Northwest politicians are taking sides, as KUOW’s Liz Jones reports.

Jay Inslee says he won't join the growing list of governors who say they don't want Syrian refugees within their state borders.

In an interview with NPR's Morning Edition, the governor of Washington state publicly welcomed refugees, citing the inscription on the Statue of Liberty, warning fellow governors against "fear," and insisting that background checks minimize whatever risk the refugees may pose.

Will The Paris Attack Change How We See Refugees?

Nov 17, 2015
Members of the Alhamdan family arrived at Sea-Tac Airport recently. They joined a tiny community of about 25 Syrian refugees who've arrived in Washington in the past few years.
Liz Jones/KUOW Public Radio

Should the U.S. suspend resettlement of Syrian refugees because one of the Paris attackers reportedly entered Europe with the recent flood of people fleeing ISIS?

At least 31 U.S. governors say yes. Not Gov. Jay Inslee – he said Washington state will keep welcoming the refugees.

Liz Jones/KUOW

Washington state will continue to welcome Syrian refugees. That’s the word from Governor Jay Inslee. At least 19 other U.S. governors have called to block refugees from Syria in response to the Paris attacks.

Updated at 5:45 p.m. ET

One of the suicide bombers who struck Paris on Friday has been identified as a Syrian who passed through Greece as an asylum-seeker this year and registered with European authorities.

That fact has spurred a strong reaction from many politicians here in the United States over the resettlement of Syrian refugees, with swift opposition from many Republican governors, and one Democrat, to further resettlement of Syrian refugees in their states.

They fled from Iraq, Syria and other desperate places — and now they find themselves on an island in the Pacific Ocean that is the smallest independent republic in the world. Children who are being detained as refugees in Nauru have reportedly started a Facebook page to tell their stories.

The creators of the page, Free the Children NAURU, say it was made to let "asylum seeker and refugee children doomed on Nauru speak out and share their dreams and hopes with other children around the world."

The first Syrian refugees have arrived in Seattle since President Obama announced the U.S. would take at least 10,000 Syrian refugees next year.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

American Airlines flight number 1239 touched down at Sea-Tac Airport, and a family of Syrian refugees walked down the jet way and into a new life.

They’re one of the first families to arrive in the Seattle area since the U.S. agreed to take in more Syrian refugees. The civil war in Syria has displaced more than 4 million people.  

Migrants in Europe spend days trapped in freezing rain

Oct 19, 2015
Antonio Bronic/Reuters

“If I could, I would [go] back to Syria,” said the woman refugee. “We are dying here, I can't sleep.”

She’s one of thousands of migrants and refugees stuck at border crossing bottlenecks in southeast Europe. Many people, including families with young children, are spending nights in the cold and rain.