refugees

People welcome Syrian refugees at the Toronto airport on Dec. 9, 2015.
Flickr Photo/Domnic Santiago (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1PpLV5f

Bill Radke speaks with Stephen Quinn about the difficulties Vancouver is facing resettling refugees, the new symbol for the falling Canadian dollar, and prosecution costs from the 2011 Stanley Cup riot. Quinn is the host of CBC One radio show On the Coast and columnist for the Globe and Mail.

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Heidi Levine

The first time I met Dr. Zoi Livaditou she had just finished examining a busload of Syrian refugees who had been rescued by the Greek Coast Guard.

It was a cool evening in fall at the port of Mytilene, the capital of the Greek island of Lesbos, and Livaditou was dressed in cargo pants and a heavy fleece jacket with a stethoscope dangling around her neck. The refugees in the bus were wet and cold, she told me, puffing on her cigarette, but fortunately everyone was OK. 

“But last night 12 people drowned.” she said.

In the middle of the desert in Kenya, there's a place with a population the size of Minneapolis, called Dadaab.

It's no ordinary city. This is the largest refugee camp in the world, home to nearly half a million people. Most came from Somalia, escaping the civil war that began in the early 1990s.

Ben Rawlence spent years working in the camp — first with Human Rights Watch, then as a journalist. He just published a book called City of Thorns: Nine Lives in the World's Largest Refugee Camp.

In the middle of the desert in Kenya, there's a place with a population the size of Minneapolis, called Dadaab.

It's no ordinary city. This is the largest refugee camp in the world, home to nearly half a million people. Most came from Somalia, escaping the civil war that began in the early 1990s.

Ben Rawlence spent years working in the camp — first with Human Rights Watch, then as a journalist. He just published a book called City of Thorns: Nine Lives in the World's Largest Refugee Camp.

Idaho Governor Butch Otter said he has received reassurances from the federal government about the adequacy of vetting of refugees from the war-torn Middle East.

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley announced Thursday that the state is suing the U.S. government over the settlement of Syrian refugees. The lawsuit, filed in federal court, accuses the Obama administration of violating the Refugee Act of 1980 by not consulting states on the placement of refugees.

Ralph Munro, Washington's former secretary of state, blows bubbles with Vietnamese refugees. Gov. Dan Evans asked Munro to find out more about the refugees, so he went to Camp Pendleton in California in 1975.
Courtesy of Ralph Munro

This story was first published April 9, 2015.  

Dan Evans was furious.

So furious he cursed (and he was not someone who swore).

It was 1975 and the Washington state governor had picked up the morning paper and read that Gov. Jerry Brown of California had said Vietnamese refugees wouldn’t be welcome in his state.

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Mohammad Qais Rahmani 

This year, many journalists have spent time analyzing the huge wave of new migrants arriving in Europe from the Middle East and Africa.

It can be easy to forget the human stories behind that movement of people. But for some BBC journalists the story has come much closer to home.

Much closer.

Rustam Qobil is a reporter on the BBC’s Uzbek language service. One of his former colleagues is the young Afghan journalist Sayara Samadi.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

The photo of a 3-year-old child named Aylan Kurdi, face-down on a Turkish beach, has become emblematic of the suffering of refugees fleeing Syria's civil war.

Ranj Abudlsamad in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Bill Radke speaks with Ranj Abdulsamad about coming to Seattle as a refugee in 2012 and how he now helps other refugees adjust to live in America. 

This Iranian refugee family was resettled in Kent this year. It's their first Christmas in the U.S.
KUOW photo/Liz Jones

Princess dolls, race cars and bicycles with training wheels. Those are a few of the gifts handed out to hundreds of families in Kent this week. Many were immigrants and refugees, and for some it will be their first Christmas here in the U.S.

Canada's new Prime Minister Justin Trudeau pledged to bring in 25,000 Syrians within a matter of months, but it's not just his government that's handling the massive task of resettling the refugees.

Across Canada, churches, communities and businesses are all pitching in, as are many individuals, who are privately sponsoring Syrian families and covering most of their needs for the first year.

The national debate about whether or not to welcome refugees from the war-torn Middle East was hashed out again in Tuesday night’s Republican presidential debate. In Twin Falls, Idaho, conservative activists are not just talking about the issue, they're taking action.

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Todd Karol

What was it about Canada this year? A new prime minister, an attempt at taking already legendary niceness up a notch? These stories caught our eye — in a good way.

1. New prime minister makes waves

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