Reel-To-Reel | KUOW News and Information

Reel-To-Reel

Flickr/Daniella Urdinlaiz (CC BY 2.0)

Comedian George Carlin is funny and serious as he talks about white privilege, things he could do without, and why he dislikes the label Native American. 

"They're not natives, they emigrated here. They came from Asia. And putting the word American on them is the supreme insult. After you steal their cultures, put them on the worst land possible, give them blankets with smallpox then turn around and give your name. It's repulsive." 

Carlin was interviewed by KUOW's Steve Scher on the occasion of publishing his book "Brain Droppings." 

https://www.google.com/search?q=ruth+brown&safe=off&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiH9KnPjc3UAhUC62MKHbB6BloQiR4IiQE&biw=1536&bih=735#imgrc=2TEPzrCH3me5HM:

Ruth Brown (1928-2006) was known as the queen of R&B. She had a series of hit songs for Atlantic Records in the 1950s, such as "So Long", "Teardrops from My Eyes" and "(Mama) He Treats Your Daughter Mean." Atlantic became known as "the house that Ruth built" (alluding to the popular nickname for the old Yankee Stadium).

Between 1949 and 1955, her records stayed on the R&B chart for a total of 149 weeks, with sixteen in the top 10, including five number-one hits.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurt_Vonnegut#/media/File:Kurt_Vonnegut_1972.jpg

 

Kurt Vonnegut (1922-2007) was grim about the future in a hilarious way.

Sydney Opera House

Artist Laurie Anderson has written six books, released a dozen albums, created multimedia performances for human and canine audiences and produced an acclaimed documentary film.

In 1992, on the occasion of her book Stories from the Nerve Bible, she talks with Ross Reynolds about her short stint as an art teacher ("I made up stories about artists"), why she made an American Express commercial, her thoughts on the then emerging internet, and how her first hit “O Superman” was appropriated for a car alarm company. 

Sir Mix-A-Lot at work in his studio Sept. 8, 2003, in Auburn, Wash.
AP Photo/Jim Bryant

Sir Mix-a-lot was born Anthony Ray in Seattle on August 12, 1963. He was rapping in the early ’80s, and co-founded the Nastymix record label in 1983 with his DJ, Nasty Nes, who also hosted Seattle’s first hip-hop radio show.

Flickr photo/Franck Michel(CC by 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/gbreXU

Andrei Codrescu is a Romanian-American poet, novelist, essayist, screenwriter, and commentator for NPR. His droll reflections on America and the world delighted audiences with their humor and insight.

Codrescu spoke to KUOW’s Ross Reynolds in 1994 about his film "Road Scholar" a documentary about driving across America in a red Cadillac, encountering the devastation of Detroit and the remnants of the 1960s hippie culture.  

“America has this uncanny ability to sustain paradox," he said. "In Europe, we’d be tearing ourselves apart.”

NASA

In this 1989 interview, astronaut Buzz Aldrin frankly describes how his unstructured post-NASA life lead to  mental health issues and alcoholism.

A photocopy of the Seattle Times' front page the day after 9-year-old George Weyerhaeuser returned home to Tacoma. A sports reporter found him in Issaquah and drove him home.
Seattle Public Library archives

It was the Northwest’s most notorious kidnapping case. Little George Weyerhaeuser had been snatched off the streets of Tacoma and held for $200,000 ransom.  

Eighty years later, Weyerhaeuser, the timber titan, told me he hadn’t read much news coverage about his kidnapping. 

He has a vivid memory of those eight days, he said, but he hadn’t dug through those old stories from 1935. He was 9 at the time, after all, and his parents wanted to leave the kidnapping in the past. They wanted him to grow up without this traumatic event hanging over his life.

Children's book author and illustrator Maurice Sendak, points to a 3-year-old fan Marcus Gabrielli as he signed autographs in New York.
AP Photo/Mike Appleton

Did Maurice Sendak, author of "Where The Wild Things Are," talk to kids about his work?

It was 1991, and Sendak had come into the KUOW studios for an interview with Ross Reynolds on “Seattle  Afternoon.”  

Bertha K. Landes served as mayor of Seattle from 1926 to 1928. She was Seattle's first and only female mayor -- also Seattle's first female police chief, according to journalist Emmett Watson.
University of Washington Digital Archives

Before Bertha was a boring machine stuck under Seattle, she was Seattle’s first female mayor.

In 1926, her campaign motto was “municipal housekeeping.”

Bertha K. Landes was her full name and “she was wonderful,” according to columnist Emmett Watson.

Julia Child was tired of hearing people complain about salt, cholesterol and fat. Try moderation and exercise, she said. This photo was taken in 1992, two years after her interview with KUOW's Ross Reynolds.
AP Photo/Jon Chase

Julia Child was mad.

“I think the word ‘healthy’ and the word ‘light’ are really kind of meaningless,” the renowned cook told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds in a prescient 1990 interview. “There are no bad or good foods; they are just healthy and unhealthy ways of using them.”

Author Walter Mosley and his father in front of their home in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles.
Waltermosley.com

People usually remember as far back as the generation that raises them, says writer Walter Mosley.

Mosley had come into KUOW’s studios to speak with KUOW’s Ross Reynolds. It was 1992, and his third book, "White Butterfly," had just been published.

Easy Rawlins, Mosley’s main character, emerged from those memories. Easy was a fixer, a guy who does favors for people.

The writer Ursula K. Le Guin in 2012.
Photo © 2012 Laura Anglin

“If you have a person who is both male and female, what’s the pronoun you use?”

Ursula K. Le Guin posed that question in 1988 when she came in to the KUOW studios for an interview with Ross Reynolds.

Before he created The Simpson, Matt Groening created the 'Life in Hell' comic series. Among his characters were Akbar and Jeff, whose origins go back to Groening's fifth-grade attempts at mimicking 'Peanuts.'
Matt Groening / 'Life In Hell'

Before The Simpsons, there were crazy rabbits and Akbar and Jeff.

Matt Groening, who created television’s most iconic cartoon family, spoke with Ross Reynolds in the late 1980s on the show Seattle Afternoon.