Radio Retrospecitve

Kenya Post-Election Violence
10:00 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Report On Kenya, Early Brain Responses To Language, And The Rules Of Writing Radio Drama

In 2010, 1 in 120 public school students were counted in Washington's autism child count.
KUOW/Serene Careaga

Kenyan Truth Justice And Reconciliation Report
Last week a Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission delivered a report on 2007 post-election violence in Kenya that killed more than 1,000 people and left 600,000 homeless. Seattle University law professor Ronald Slye was one of three international commissioners. He joins us with a look at the findings.

Understanding Developmental Outcomes In Children With Autism
By studying brain pattern responses to words in 2-year-olds with autism spectrum disorder, researchers have been able to predict a child's linguistic, cognitive and adaptive skills at age 4 and 6. Dr. Patricia Kuhl, co-director of the University of Washington’s Institute for Learning and Brain Science, studies early language and brain development. She lead the study and explains its implications.  

Radio Retrospective: The Rules Of Writing Radio Drama
At the start of radio’s Golden Age, people didn’t know how to write for radio.  They remade stage plays and movies, but that didn’t really work. Rules for writing a good radio drama developed over time. We explore the main rules scriptwriters followed.

Restaurant Recommendation
Food writer Sara Dickerman joins us with a lunch recommendation. Prefer to cook for yourself? She also has a pick for a great cookbook!

Listener Call-In
10:00 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Memories Of Prom, And Jobs In Sound Effects

"Weekday" producer Katy Sewall (seated, left) her sophomore year, with her date, Per, and friends. Mercer Island High School theme in 1993 was the classic "Stairway to Heaven."

 Seattle-Area Employment Picture Brightens
The region's economic picture appears to be brightening as King County's unemployment rate fell to 4.4 percent in April. We hear why from Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton.

Call In: What Do You Remember About Prom?
It’s prom season. When you were in high school, did you go to prom? What memory stands out years later?  Maybe it’s the way you were asked to prom.  Maybe it is some little detail you’ll never forget. Maybe what you remember is why you didn’t go to prom. Share your funny, touching, sweet and embarrassing memories of prom with us at 206.543.5869 or email weekday@kuow.org.

Radio Retrospective: Not all Sound Effects Jobs Are Created Equal
Sound effects artists were in high demand during the golden age of radio. That doesn’t mean they were all equals; there definitely was a pecking order. We’ll find out what it was.

A Lunch Recommendation
For our Thursday lunch recommendation, food writer Sara Dickerman profiles El Portal at Madison and 23rd. If you prefer to cook for yourself, she suggests “Jane Grigson’s Vegetable Book.”

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Politic & Government
10:26 am
Thu May 16, 2013

Ask King County Executive Dow Constantine And Radio Retrospective

Flickr photo/topquark22

 Ask King County Executive Dow Constantine
Every month, King County Executive Dow Constantine joins us to chat about issues facing King County. Today he’s here to discuss the possible cuts to King County Metro, Dow’s re-election campaign, and of course Seattle’s unyielding desire for an NBA franchise. If you have a question for the King County Executive, feel free to give us a call at 206-543-5869 or toll-free at 800-289-5869.  
 
Radio Retrospective: When Music and Comedy Merge
Radio had a huge effect on the music industry. Suddenly musicians had regular work composing and performing on radio dramas.  Radio also turned select musicians into actors.  What happens when music and comedy merge?

A Lunch Recommendation
For our Thursday lunch recommendation, food writer Sara Dickerman profiles the Blossom Restaurant in Renton.   If you prefer to cook for yourself, she suggests “The Duke’s Table: The Complete Book of Vegetarian Italian Cooking.”

Social Issues
10:00 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Defining Genius, Radio Retrospective, And A Lunch Pick

Audio tape reels.
Flickr Photo/Carbon Arc

Your Bike Helmet Isn't As Safe As You Think
You probably think your bicycle helmet keeps you safe getting a concussion. You’re wrong. It doesn’t. Most helmets only prevent skull fractures. As a result, bicycle deaths are down, but concussions and other brain injuries are on the rise as biking becomes more popular. Writer Bruce Barcott explains that some helmet manufactures have ignored the concussion problem because they believed it couldn’t be fixed. Others thought consumers would be unwilling to pay more for a protection they assume they already have.

Who's A Genius?
We often toss around the word “genius,” but what does it really mean? How does the definition of genius change depending on region or expertise? Eleven years ago, the staff at The Stranger weekly newspaper came up with the tongue-in-cheek Genius Awards for artists in the Seattle area. They were joking, but over the past decade, awards have gone to some people who would fit the dictionary description.

Radio Retrospective: From Live To Tape
During the early years of radio, performances were always live  — that is, until tape was invented and accepted by the industry. How did tape change radio?

A Lunch Recommendation
Food writer Sara Dickerman joins us with a lunch recommendation. Prefer to cook for yourself? She also has a pick for a great cookbook!

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Arts and Entertainment
10:00 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Seattle Reads Gregory Martin, And Comics On The Radio

Cover of Gregory Martin's "Stories For Boys."

 

Seattle Reads: Gregory Martin
What would you do if you found out that your 65-year-old father had attempted suicide? Or that he’d been sexually abused by his own father? Or that he’d been a closeted gay man throughout 39 years of marriage? Gregory Martin learned all this one evening, and it changed his relationship with his parents. Martin chronicles his experiences in the memoir "Stories for Boys," this year’s Seattle Reads book.

Radio Retrospective: Comics On The Radio
We’re familiar with comics being adapted to the big screen. But you might not know that comic strip adaptations aren’t new. Comics were also adapted into radio dramas. There’s Blondie, Archie Andrews, and Superman, and that’s just the beginning.  Listen back to the comics strips of the radio.

A Lunch Recommendation
Food writer Sara Dickerman joins us with a lunch recommendation. Prefer to cook for yourself? She also has a pick for a great cookbook!

Housing Development
10:00 am
Thu April 25, 2013

South Lake Union, Gun Control, And Our Miss Brooks

A skyline view from South Lake Union Park.
Flickr Photo/l.madhavan (CC BY-NC-ND)

The New Affordable Housing Requirements In South Lake Union
The Seattle City Council will require developers to put in some affordable housing in new South Lake Union residential towers, or pay for the city to build it. Developers are still deciding whether the requirement will make taller buildings in the neighborhood economically feasible.

Politics Is A Fighting Word
In Olympia, stronger laws regarding gun control couldn’t get past the opposition from state Senate leadership. What will citizens who support gun control do now? Eric Liu lobbied in Olympia for stronger gun control rules in Washington state.

Radio Retrospective: Gloria McMillan From Our Miss Brooks
Our Miss Brooks starring Eve Arden was a popular comedy show during radio’s golden age. Gloria McMillan was a teenager when she played Harriet on the show. She shares her insider take on the cast, Hollywood and what it was like to work in radio.

A Lunch Recommendation
Food writer Sara Dickerman recommends Pestle Rock Isan Thai Cuisine this week. It's a Thai restaurant in Ballard with bright and spicy, salads and delicious young coconut juice. You can read her recommendation for the the best hotels for food lovers in Bon Appetite.

Mental Health
10:00 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Living With Bipolar Disorder

How does mental illness shape relationships with others?
Credit Flickr Photo/Majicdolphin

What does it feel like to be bipolar? How does mental illness affect family and relationships? What misunderstandings does the general public have about people who are bipolar? Katy Sewall speaks with Janine Crowley Haynes, author of the memoir “My Kind of Crazy: Living in a Bipolar World.”

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Health Policy
5:17 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

How Doctors Are Handling 'Death With Dignity'

A new study in the New England Journal of Medicine looks at how one Seattle medical institution has managed the state’s 2009 Death With Dignity law. The report shows how rarely Washington state residents have pursued a legal prescription to end their own life, and describes the early debate among physicians over whether to participate. We talk with study author Dr. Elizabeth Loggers of Seattle Cancer Care Alliance.

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Cultural Heritage
10:00 am
Thu March 28, 2013

A "Yokohama Yankee" Journeys Into His Family's Past

Leslie Helm's 'Yokohama Yankee.'

Leslie Helm was born and raised in Yokohama, Japan. Most of his family members are of European descent, and you would be hard pressed to look into his face and see his half-Japanese grandparents reflected back. When he adopted Japanese children, he started exploring his own roots. Leslie Helm takes us along on his journey as a "Yokohama Yankee" — a story that outlines the racial and economic tensions that defined US and Japanese relations for much of the 19th and 20th centuries.

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Real Estate Development
10:00 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Rising Popularity Of Microhousing

Microhousing construction in Capitol Hill.
Credit Flickr Photo/Jseattle/Capitol Hill Seattle Blog

As the cost of living continues to rise in the city, people are finding it harder to find an affordable place to live. To accommodate the demand, developers are building microhousing -- tiny studio apartments with private bathrooms that share a kitchen with other units. The microhouses boast affordable living in high-demand neighborhoods such as Capitol Hill and the University District. However, residents in some neighborhoods fear the developments skirt zoning laws and create too much density too fast. City Councilmember Tom Rasmussen is considering legislation that could put new restrictions on microhousing. He joins us to explain.

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Police Reform
10:00 am
Thu March 7, 2013

Connie Rice On Seattle Police Reform

Seattle Police on patrol.
Credit Flickr Photo/ Eric Peacock

A plan from the court-appointed monitor overseeing Seattle’s police reforms to address biased policing and excessive use of force within the SPD was overshadowed this week by a standoff between Mayor Mike McGinn and City Attorney Pete Holmes. The two argued publicly over who has authority to act on the city’s behalf. Yesterday, Mayor McGinn said he regretted the public argument and called for a pause. L.A.-based civil rights attorney Connie Rice is advising the mayor's office as the city moves forward on a consent decree with the Justice Department. We’ll speak with her about the work so far and what she calls a “quest for trust” in Seattle.

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Auto Sales
10:00 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Why Are Used Cars So Valuable?

"Sale" is spelled out in the open hoods of used cars at a Toyota dealership in Glendale, Calif.
Credit AP Photo/Reed Saxon

Right now is a terrible time to buy a used car. But it’s an excellent time to sell a used car, especially here in Seattle. Sales of new cars plunged between 2008 and 2010, and that’s caused a shortage of used cars. According to Forbes, Seattle is the second worst city in the country to buy a used car. So why here? We'll get some answers from Micheline Maynard. She covers business and the automobile industry for Forbes and other publications.

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Politics & Government
10:00 am
Thu February 21, 2013

Ask King County Executive Dow Constantine

King County Executive Dow Constantine in KUOW's studios.
Credit KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

For four decades, public defenders in King County have worked for private, non-profit companies. Soon they'll become public employees. Some are concerned this could weaken the county's public defense system. What will it mean for those who rely on public defenders? We’ll talk it over with King County Executive Dow Constantine. Plus, we’ll find out what’s in store for Seattle's next gun buyback as state legislators in Olympia consider background checks on gun sales. And are the Sonics any closer to coming back to town? King County Executive Dow Constantine joins us. Have a question? Email us at weekday@kuow.org.

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Love & Hurt
10:00 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Weekday's Annual Valentine's Day Special

The heart is a fragile thing.
Credit Flickr Photo/Sean McGrath



Yes, it's Valentine’s Day. Does that make you flush with romance? Cold with regret? Or is it just like any other day, but with slightly more chocolate? Sometimes it takes another person to bring out a piece of ourselves we didn't realize we had before. Tell us about the new you brought about by someone else. Or, tell us the exact moment you knew a relationship was over and done. Share your stories with us at 206.543.5869 or weekday@kuow.org.

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Written Word
10:00 am
Thu February 7, 2013

Why Write Letters?

For the love of the letter.
Credit Flickr photo/Pimthida

People don’t write letters much anymore. They don’t even mail in bills! As a result, the postal service is cutting Saturday mail service to save money. So, let us pause for a moment to reflect on the letter. What is lost if handwritten letters are no longer written? If you still write letters, why do you? Author Nick Bantock ponders those questions with us. Tell us what you think at weekday@kuow.org or call 206.543.5869.

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