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Milo Yiannopoulos in 2013.
Flickr Photo/OFFICIAL LEWEB PHOTOS (CC BY 2.0) http://bit.ly/2gSSOpS

At the University of Washington, the College Republicans club is being accused of inflaming tensions by inviting a right-wing speaker for Jan. 20, Inauguration Day.

Those Republicans, however, say the timing of the appearance of Milo Yiannopoulos, an editor at Breitbart News, is accidental. Breitbart News publishes pieces that criticize and ridicule working women, Muslims and people of color.

File photo, 2013. Police arrest protesters in Bellevue.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Know your rights.

That’s the topic many post-election community meetings with immigrants and refugees around Seattle, and around the country.


Confronted with hate speech in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle, Amy Kastelin said 'that's unacceptable.'
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

Amy Kastelin was at the U.S. Bank in Ballard this week when another customer yelled at a teller.

“Go back to where you came from,” the customer told the bank worker.


Mina Sultana, co-president of the Muslim Student Association at the UW, advises all Muslim students to walk with a buddy on and off campus and 'be extra cautious of their surroundings.'
KUOW PHOTO/DAVID HYDE

The 911 call came in two days after the presidential election from the security guard at Nathan Hale High School in Seattle.  He was reporting a possible hate crime.  

The target was a 16-year-old student who was on her way to school when a man she did not know allegedly grabbed her by the arm and refused to let her go. 


The day after the election, Jen Stebbins-Han's kids came home from school and posed a question that before this year, she says, she might have laughed off.

"My kids came home and asked us if their dad was going to be deported," she says. "I don't know where they heard that because it wasn't from us."

Stebbins-Han's husband is Korean-American. Jen is white. The couple has three young biracial kids.

"There is a part of me that's afraid because I don't know what somebody's going to do because they feel emboldened to be able to," she says.

Vectorportal.com: Vectorportal/Flickr Photo http://bit.ly/2gDfkjT CC BY 2.0
Vectorportal.com: Vectorportal/Flickr Photo http://bit.ly/2gDfkjT CC BY 2.0

This letter was written in response to an essay, A man shouts racial slurs in a Seattle Starbucks. The silence is deafening. We have granted this writer anonymity because she expressed fear that including her name could make her a target.

Stephen Bannon, center left, back, campaign CEO for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, looks on as Trump speaks during a campaign rally on Election Day.
AP Photo/ Evan Vucci

In journalism, we avoid wonk.

Which is why we at KUOW discussed whether to use the term “alt-right.” Mainstream news sites have plugged it into headlines, but our readers and listeners were confused. What does that label even mean?

This story was updated with video at 8:08 p.m. ET

Vice President-elect Mike Pence was presumably seeking a quiet night out at the theater, enjoying one of Broadway's hottest tickets with a Friday night performance of Hamilton: An American Musical.

What he got instead was a welcome of boos and cheers from the crowd and a pointed plea from the diverse cast and crew afterwards about what they believe really makes America great.

Iesha Gray, 20, resigned from her job at the U.S. Postal Service because she felt she wasn't given time or space she found acceptable to pump.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Iesha Gray called it the drought.

One month back from maternity leave, her breasts were empty. No more milk. Her baby girl at home was drinking her way through the freezer stash.

A surrogate of President-elect Donald Trump on Wednesday invoked Japanese internment camps as precedent for creating a registry for Muslim immigrants. This comes less than a week after the Kansas secretary of state told Reuters that Trump's team might reprise a post-Sept. 11 national registry of immigrants from countries regarded as havens for "extremist activity."

Such conversations in the president-elect's circles have raised new concerns about civil rights among advocates for American Muslims.

Minidoka Japanese internment camp in Idaho.
Flickr Photo/Samantha Smith (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/Nhc4WG

Bill Radke talks to Tom Ikeda, the director of nonprofit Densho, about his family's experience in the Minidoka internment camps and how he's working to make sure no community in America is interned again.  

Twitter has suspended several accounts linked to the alt-right movement, which has been associated with white nationalism.

The move comes as Twitter is rolling out a series of actions to curb hate speech and abuse on its platform as criticism has mounted of the company's failure to rein in harassment, racism, sexism and anti-Semitism.

There's been lots of chatter on social media and among pundits, warning that the treatment of immigrant kids and English language learners is going to "get worse" under a Donald Trump presidency.

Some people on Twitter are even monitoring incidents in which Latino students in particular have been targeted.

But I wonder: When were these students not targeted? When did immigrant students and their families ever have it easy?

R
Lucas Jackson/Reuters  

President-elect Donald Trump has clarified his threat to deport undocumented immigrants: Early in the campaign he had threatened to remove all of an estimated 11 million people living in the United States without papers. But on Sunday night he told CBS' “60 Minutes” that only those with criminal records will be removed.

Hate crimes in 2015 were more than 6 percent more frequent than they were in 2014, with a two-thirds increase in religiously motivated attacks against Muslims.

The FBI's Hate Crimes Statistics, 2015 report tallied more than 5,850 hate crime incidents in 2015.

Most of the crimes were intimidation, vandalism or assault.

Most of those — 56.9 percent — were racially motivated, with more than half of race-based attacks targeting African-Americans.

Gwen Ifill, one of the most prominent political journalists in the country, has died, according to PBS. She was 61.

Even a well known story depends on where you begin to tell it.

In the summer of 1955, Emmett Till, a 14-year-old African-American boy visiting Mississippi, was lynched by white men who said he'd flirted with a white woman. Till's body was returned home to Chicago where his mother insisted on an open casket. Photos were wired around the globe and the world saw his mutilated body. His murderers would be free within a month.

Brian Wahlberg gives daughter Luciena a good view of the proceedings as the crowd sings at Cal Anderson Park in Seattle.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

In the liberal bastion that is Seattle, the response to the election was acute. People cried openly on buses and in cafes. Some took time off work to mourn in bed. It wasn't that their candidate had lost, we heard again and again, it was that they feared for the future.

Ijeoma Oluo
Courtesy of Ijeoma Oluo

Bill Radke sits down with Seattle writer Ijeoma Oluo to discuss the outcome of the presidential election. For many progressives like her, Trump's win was a difficult pill to swallow.

Oluo's intial reaction was to console her family after it became clear Tuesday night that Donald Trump would become the next president of the United States.


A few years ago, the Urban Institute undertook a massive experiment to measure discrimination in home rentals and sales. The researchers sent hundreds of people in dozens of cities across the country to act as applicants trying to rent or buy apartments and houses. The "testers" were given similar credit histories and financial qualifications.

People take part in a 'Black Lives Matter' demonstration.
Flickr Photo/Joe Brusky (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/pscnno

You may have heard the term “white fragility.” Dr. Robin DiAngelo coined the expression to describe the defensive positions white people often take when confronted with the facts of racism.

This talk details the realities of our racist society today and points towards possible remedies.

Former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard David Duke drew protesters to a U.S. Senate candidate debate in Louisiana on Wednesday night.

He's in a crowded field to replace retiring Republican Sen. David Vitter and earned enough support in polls to make the cut for this final debate, hosted by Raycom Media at Dillard University, a historically black college in New Orleans.

Dillard officials say they didn't know who would be participating when they agreed to rent the hall.

Bill Radke talks to professor David Domke, chair of  the Department of Communication at the University of Washington, about how racial and religious changes in the country affect elections.

In 1969, Philip Zimbardo, a psychologist from Stanford University, ran an interesting field study. He abandoned two cars in two very different places: one in a mostly poor, crime-ridden section of New York City, and the other in a fairly affluent neighborhood of Palo Alto, Calif. Both cars were left without license plates and parked with their hoods up.

Jasmine Westmoreland’s mother is white, her father black. Her skin is a lovely light brown. And that makes many of the people she meets wonder.

"I get the question a lot — like, what are you? People ask me constantly, probably once a week," she said.

"A lot of them will be like, 'Are you this? Are you that? Are you Brazilian? ... You dance really well, you must be Cuban, you must be this.' And I'm like, 'Nope, black and white.' 'No you're not.' 'You're going to argue with me right now?'

"They do. They will argue, what I am."

Monica Guzman / The Evergrey

Bill Radke speaks with local journalists Monica Guzman, co-founder of Seattle newsletter The Evergrey, and Reagan Jackson, writer at The Seattle Globalist and South Seattle Emerald, about #JournalismSoWhite.

UW Professor Megan Ming Francis at Kane Hall on October 12, 2016.`
Courtesy of Emile Pitre

As we come to the end of a very long presidential election cycle, what can we do to remedy our legacy of racial injustice and move forward? University of Washington professor Megan Ming Francis searches for answers to that question in her talk “Race and Violence in American Politics.”

The top civil rights lawyer at the Oregon Department of Justice is suing his employer. Erious Johnson alleged in a lawsuit filed in federal court that the agency violated his civil rights.

The old Liberty Bank building in Seattle's Central Area before it was demolished. Affordable housing will go up in its place.
Google Maps

There's a new building going up in the heart of Seattle's Central District.

It's a project that could help bring back renters who've been priced out of the neighborhood.


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