race

With the overwhelming support of the Senate, Dr. Carla Hayden has been approved as the next librarian of Congress.

Hayden, the head of Baltimore's public library system and the former president of the American Library Association, is the first woman and the first African-American to hold the post.

Hayden was nominated by President Obama in February, but a vote on her nomination wasn't held until Wednesday.

Teri Rogers Kemp once stood on a corner with a sign and yelled at cars. Over time, she has found more effective strategies.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Local activists want to make it easier to prosecute police who use deadly force. They’re gathering signatures for an initiative that would eliminate a common defense used by police: That they acted “without malice.”

We bring you a profile of one of the people organizing support for the initiative.


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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/canadaone/">msppmoore</a> on Flickr/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>

After the death of Alton Sterling — and Philando Castile, Jamar Clark, Tamir Rice, Michael Brown, Freddie Gray, Trayvon Martin and all the other people of color recently killed by police — many questions will likely go unanswered.

Noel Gasca poses for a graduation shot with her father, Rick Gasca, and mother, Kim Chapman.
Courtesy of Noel Gasca

On a sunny morning during my junior year of high school  I was taking the SAT, when I got to a question that left me stumped. 

It basically asked, "What race are you?"

Mount Calvary member Vera Brooks greets a newcomer at Sunday service.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

After a week of tragedy and racial tensions, Sunday church services gave people a place to talk about it, especially within black congregations in the Seattle area

KUOW's Liz Jones visited the morning service at Mount Calvary Christian Center in Seattle’s Central District.

Protesters gathered around the country Saturday. And while the demonstrations were largely peaceful, tensions erupted in Minnesota and Louisiana, where police arrested more than 200 people.

Police in St. Paul, Minnesota, said they arrested 102 people after demonstrators blocked an interstate roadway for several hours.

It's hard to figure out what to say after the horrific violence of recent days, but Shereen Marisol Meraji and Gene Demby are our guides as they walk us through this week's extra episode.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the#NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

From Digital News Intern Gabriel Rosenberg:

I'll happily admit to a longtime HGTV addiction. But I have a much more complicated relationship with the tiny-house shows that now fill those sort of channels.

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Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

In the wake of the tragic shooting deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, and the tragic shooting deaths of five Dallas police officers at a Thursday night protest against police brutality, it is easy to feel disheartened. It is easy to feel that the problem is too large to ever be solved.

Seconds after a policeman shot a man named Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minn., his girlfriend started live-streaming the aftermath live on Facebook.

Valerie Castile, the mother of Philando Castile — who was shot to death during a police traffic stop in suburban Minneapolis, Minn., Wednesday — says her son's death is part of a pattern of police killing black people, and that there need to be consequences.

A woman who began streaming video on Facebook immediately after her boyfriend was shot by police in suburban Minneapolis, Minn., says he had been stopped for a broken tail light — and that he was licensed to carry a gun. The killing of Philando Castile, 32, is the second fatal encounter between police and a black man to gain national attention this week.

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Courtesy/Black Lives Matter TO.

There was a parade. And then a sit-in. And then a parade again.

Canada’s largest LGBTQ event was stalled briefly on Sunday when a group from Toronto’s Black Lives Matter movement sat down on the city’s parade route.

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