Kim Malcolm speaks with Vickie Ybarra, a former elected official on the Yakima school board, about how Latinos in Yakima are making their voices heard and what representation in the City Council means for the community. 

The St. Louis region became the unexpected center of an international conversation and movement for change following the death of Michael Brown on August 9, 2014.

St. Louis Public Radio has compiled select sounds and images of the past year, highlighting moments in history and sharing voices of newsmakers and neighbors alike. 

We invite you to take some time, reflect and put on your headphones to experience One Year in Ferguson: How it Sounded. How it Looked. How it Felt.

Here's What Black Lives Matter Looks Like In Canada

Aug 7, 2015

When we're talking about police brutality, issues in Canada aren't on a lot of American's radar. If anything, there's a widespread belief that Canada is some sort of racism-free zone.

But according to many black Canadians, a #BlackLivesMatter movement is badly needed in that country — and it's starting to take shape.

RadioActive Explores Minority Representation With Hari Kondabolu

Jul 31, 2015
KUOW Photo / Jenny Asarnow

Aisha Burka and Mimansa Dogra explore the representation of minorities in the media, and discuss what needs to be changed. Hear their interviews with Tani Ikeda, co-founder of imMEDIAte Justice, a program built to empower young women through film, and Hari Kondabolu, known for his politically and socially charged comedy. 

At Hack the CD this weekend, the focus was on problems facing Seattle's Central District.
KUOW Photo/Jamala Henderson

Damon Bomar wants to create an app that would help people find local odd jobs.

“For me personally it would work because I have a job, but at the same time I need a little more money on the side,” Bomar said. He presented his idea at the second Hack the CD conference in Seattle.

This week saw the release of Harper Lee’s “Go Set a Watchman,” a follow-up to her beloved book “To Kill a Mockingbird.” But for Alice Randall, a professor of African-American and diaspora studies at Vanderbilt University, the first novel still has a lot of relevance today.

In Court, Your Face Could Determine Your Fate

Jul 17, 2015

Your face has a profound effect on the people around you. Its expression can prompt assumptions about how kind, mean or trustworthy you are. And for some people, a study finds, it could help determine their fate in court.

Artist Lois Thadei in woven hat, photographed at Ginger Street in Olympia during Art Walk.
Courtesy of Kay Shultz

Lois Thadei’s full name is Lois Chichnikoff Thadei.

But everyone calls her Louie. She says white people have a hard time pronouncing her name.

Editor's note: spoilers ahead.

I don't remember how old I was when I read To Kill A Mockingbird for the first time. But I do know that I loved it — which is why I was thrilled in February at the news that another manuscript penned by Harper Lee, previously unknown to the larger public, existed and would be published this summer.

The parents of Antonio Zambrano-Montes have filed a claim for damages with the City of Pasco, Washington, for $4.76 million.

Dear Seattle: It's Time To Desegregate

Jul 9, 2015

Ross Reynolds talks with Ron Sims, former King County executive and former deputy secretary for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, about new rules aimed to address persistent housing segregation in cities. Explore an interactive map of race based on the 2010 census. 

Oregon lawmakers are demanding the removal of the Mississippi state flag from display in front of the Oregon capitol.

Confederate flag
Flickr Photo/pixxiestails (CC BY NC 2.0)

Ross Reynolds talked with Crosscut's Knute Berger about the Northwest's long and surprising history with the Confederate flag and other symbols of the Confederacy. Berger wrote about that history for Crosscut

Can racism cause post-traumatic stress? That's one big question psychologists are trying to answer, particularly in the aftermath of the shooting at the historically black Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C., and the recent incidents involving police where race was a factor.

What's clear is that many black Americans experience what psychologists call "race-based trauma," says Monnica Williams, director of the Center for Mental Health Disparities at the University of Louisville.