race

Art Exhibit
1:14 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

RACE: Are We So Different?

Flickr Photo/Nathan Gibbs

What does race mean? How much of what race means is determined by biology? And how much by society? Is there confusion between the biological basis of race and how we view race? These are the questions answered in a new exhibit at the Pacific Science Center titled "RACE: Are We So Different?"

In conjunction with the exhibit, the Pacific Science Center and city of Seattle are hosting two evening events that examine the state of racial inequities in the United States. Ross Reynolds sits down with John Powell, director of the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, and Julie Nelson, director of the Race and Social Justice Initiative for the city of Seattle for a discussion on race in Seattle.

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Matrimonial Trends
8:00 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Is Marriage For White People? With Ralph Richard Banks

Ralph Richard Banks' book "Is Marriage for White People?"

Though it was once the norm to get hitched right out of high school, marriage has declined throughout American society. This development is the most pronounced among African Americans, and black women are more than three times as likely as white women never to marry. When black women do marry, they are more likely than any other group to wed a man who is less educated or earns less money than they do.

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War Writers
6:00 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Writing About War, Black In Seattle And Maggie Greenwald

Anthony Swofford's book "Jarhead"

The Art Of Writing About War

War is hard to describe. In his memoir, "Jarhead," Gulf War Marine Anthony Swofford writes, "This is not funny, the possibility of death, but like many combatants before us we laugh to obscure the tragedy of our cheap, squandered lives." Swofford and writers Dave Danelo and Michael Yon joined us in 2008 to discuss the challenges of war and the challenges of writing about it.

Black In Seattle: What It Was Like In 2002

Back in 2002, Seattle Times columnist Jerry Large asked his readers to share thoughts on what it’s like to be black in Seattle. In 2002, living patterns were shifting rapidly, and a few shootings put race on the public’s mind. Steve Scher talked with Large and listeners about what it was like to be black in Seattle.

Director Maggie Greenwald On Making “The Ballad of Little Jo”

Maggie Greenwald is an actress, director and screenwriter. She is perhaps best known for writing and directing “The Ballad of Little Jo,” a film based on the true story of a woman attempting to escape the stigma of having a child out of wedlock by living as a man. Marcie Sillman talked with Greenwald in 1993 about making “The Ballad of Little Jo.”

Author Interviews
9:50 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Behind 'The New Black': The Real Piper's Prison Story

Taylor Schilling plays Piper in Netflix's Orange Is the New Black, which is based on Piper Kerman's memoir of her year in prison.
Jessica Miglio Netflix

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 8:18 am

Piper Kerman was a 24-year-old Smith College graduate in 1993, when she flew to Belgium with a suitcase of money intended for a West African drug lord.

This misguided adventure started when she began a romantic relationship with a woman who was part of what Kerman describes as a "clique of impossibly stylish and cool lesbians in their mid-30s." That woman was involved in a drug-smuggling ring, and got Kerman involved, too, though Kerman left that life after several months.

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Trayvon Martin Shooting
5:48 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Seattle's Black Clergy Respond To Zimmerman Verdict

Rev. LaVerne Hall of Mount Zion Baptist Church speaks out during Trayvon Martin Vigil in Seattle.
Liz Jones KUOW

Correction 7/18/13: A previous version of this story stated that Florida’s ‘Stand Your Ground’ law was a key part of Zimmerman’s defense. The law was a factor in the case but not part of Zimmerman’s courtroom strategy.

A group of black pastors in the Seattle area say the Trayvon Martin case should be a “wake-up call.” The religious leaders are pushing for changes in gun laws that they say contribute to racial profiling, and they're also urging community members to join their fight.

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RadioActive Youth Media
11:45 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Episode 40: Young Seattleites Say Code Switching Is A Tough Habit To Break

RadioActive's Antonia Dorn and Kadian Vanloo
KUOW Photo / Jenny Asarnow

There’s no such thing as a normal you. Do you talk to your boss the same way you talk to your dog? Probably not. This is called code switching.

Inspired by NPR’s Code Switch, hosts Kadian Vanloo and Antonia Dorn share stories about why and how youth code switch:

  • Tamil is the mother tongue for both Ananya Shankar and her cousin, RadioActive's Kamna Shastri. But when Ananya visits the United States for the first time, Kamna notices her cousin only speaks to her in English. 
  • RadioActive's Riley Guttman lives on Mercer Island where the African-American population is just over one percent. His black friend notices that when he walks in on a group of white friends, the conversation tends to change — and not how you might think.

Speaking of race, affirmative action was under scrutiny at the Supreme Court of the United States this week. It's been illegal in Washington state since 1998, but people still have opinions about it. RadioActive's Yafiet Bezabih asked Seattleites what they think.

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Food & Travel
9:00 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Roast Penguin? Jason Anthony On Antarctic Cuisine

Explorers fishing for food in the Antarctic in the early 1910s.
Credit Flickr Photo/State Library of New South Wales/Credit Frank Hurley

What is there to eat in Antarctica? Not much, though you could try penguin. In 1897, stranded Captain Georges Lecointe said penguin tasted like “beef, odiferous cod fish and a canvas-backed duck, roasted together in a pot with blood and cod-liver oil for sauce.” Desperate and trapped Antarctic explorers have eaten all kinds of awful things. Author Jason Anthony explains the culinary lengths people will go to in order to survive.

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The Race Card Project
1:29 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Six Words: Ask Who I Am, Not What

A submission to the Race Card Project, which asks people to describe their experience with race in six words.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 6:46 am

This month NPR begins a series of occasional conversations about The Race Card Project, where people can submit their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Thousands of people have shared their six-word stories and every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into the trove of six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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Civil Rights Investigation
9:10 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Feds Reviewing Discipline Rates Of Black Students In Seattle Schools

derekbruff Flickr

KUOW has learned that the U.S. Department of Education has launched an investigation into discipline rates in Seattle Public Schools. In an email, agency spokesman Jim Bradshaw told KUOW that its Office for Civil Rights is looking into whether black students in Seattle are disciplined "more frequently and more harshly" than white students for the same infractions.

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Race & Identity
9:00 am
Mon January 7, 2013

Gather At The Table: A Dialogue On Race

Sharon Leslie Morgan and Tom DeWolf are authors of 'Gather at the Table: The Healing Journey of a Daughter of Slavery and a Son of the Slave Trade.'
Credit Kristin Little Photography

When you look at a person, do you "see race?" Sharon Leslie Morgan and Tom DeWolf have been asking that question as they sat down at dinner tables around America. They found the lingering pain of slavery, and some paths to healing. They join us for a conversation about the journey toward racial equality.

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After High School
10:53 am
Fri December 28, 2012

Episode 35: Dance, Rap, Or Study? Three Teens' Answers To "What Are You Going To Do With Your Life?"

Deepa Liegel as the Sugar Plum Fairy with Richard Peacock in the Cornish Junior Dance Company's 2012 production of the 'Nutcracker.'
Credit Colleen Dishy

In this month’s RadioActive podcast, hosts Bryce Ellis and Daniel Metz hear stories about high school students who aren’t "sluffin" when it comes to their futures (if you don’t know what "sluffin" means this show has got your definition).

One of the kids in these stories goes down the traditional four-year college route, while the others travel off the beaten path:

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Seattle Census
9:52 am
Thu October 11, 2012

Living In A White City

Map based on 2010 census date. Red = non-Hispanic white, blue = African-American, green = Asian-American, orange = Hispanic, yellow = other. Each dot represents 25 residents. (Flickr Photo: Eric Fischer)

Seattle is one of the whitest cities in the country according to the most recent census. But what does that mean? What's it like to live in such a white city? We talk to you about the latest figures.

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