The San Francisco Police Department disproportionately targets people of color, a review by the Justice Department's Office of Community Oriented Policing Services has found.

The 400-plus-page report found among other things:

-- Nine out of 11 use of deadly force incidents from 2013 to 2016 involved people of color.

-- Black drivers were "were disproportionately stopped compared to their representation in the driving population."

Musician Yirim Seck.

Seattle musician Yirim Seck straddles two cultures. It’s been a tricky balancing act.

Seck’s father is Senegalese; his mother is from Arkansas. They met and fell in love in New York, then moved to Seattle.

After a month of student-led democracy protests in central Hong Kong in 2014, there was a moment when the students and Hong Kong's government seemed to be on the verge of actually agreeing on something.

"At one important juncture, the student leaders asked me to talk to senior [Hong Kong] government officials to explore the possibilities of conducting a debate," says Hong Kong University Political Science professor Joseph Chan.

With Chan's coaxing, the Hong Kong government, which was pro-China, agreed.

It's only the second week of oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court and already the justices are on their third case involving race and the criminal justice system.

Tuesday's case tests the constitutionality of widespread rules that bar courts from examining evidence of racial bias in jury deliberations.

President Barack Obama wears a blanket and hat given to him by Brian Cladoosby, left, President of National Congress of American Indians, during the 2016 White House Tribal Nations Conference, Monday, Set. 26, 2016.
AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Many people recognize today as Columbus Day, but that’s not the case in Seattle, Spokane, Olympia and Yakima. Those cities have voted instead to celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

With her infant son in a sling, Monique Black strolls through a weekend open house in the gentrified Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C. There are lots of factors to consider when looking for a home — in this one, Monique notices, the tiny window in the second bedroom doesn't let in enough light. But for parents like Black and her husband, Jonny, there's a more important question: How good are the nearby schools?

A few years ago, a pair of sociologists named Andrew Papachristos and Christopher Wildeman decided to study gun violence in Chicago. They focused on a specific community on the west side: overwhelmingly black and disproportionately poor, with a murder rate that was five times higher than the rest of the city.

Their approach was to look at gun violence the way epidemiologists study disease — examining the way it spread by social connections. And like a virus, they found that there were certain people who were especially at risk of being touched by it.

Paige Parsons

Ross Reynolds interviews Arlie Hochschild, professor of sociology at the University of California Berkeley, about her new book, “Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right", which has just been listed as a finalist for a 2016 National Book Award in Non-Fiction.

Hochschild spent five years among low income people in rural Louisiana in order to understand the conservative movement. 

Issa Rae knows she is committing a revolutionary act by simply creating a TV show centered on an average black woman's life.

And she can't believe it.

"Isn't it sad that it's revolutionary?" says Rae, whose new comedy Insecure, debuts on HBO Sunday night. "It's so basic ... but we don't get to do that. We don't get to just have a show about regular black people being basic."

Jesse Watters says his story was meant to be tongue-in-cheek — but his critics say he invoked a string of Asian stereotypes in a segment taped in New York City's Chinatown district. Instead of lampooning racist bigotry, his critics say, the segment embodied it.

Fox anchor Bill O'Reilly included the segment on Monday's edition of his show, saying that he sent Watters to Chinatown "to sample political opinion" because China has been repeatedly criticized by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump.

Luke Cage was one of the first black superheroes to appear in the pages of Marvel Comics, back in the 1970s.

Put in prison for a crime he didn't commit, he eventually gets put into a machine where he gains powers like super-strength and bulletproof skin. And, like many good Marvel characters, he's now on TV — in the new show Marvel's Luke Cage.

What does it mean to declare that #blacklivesmatter in education?

Last month the Movement for Black Lives, representing elements of the Black Lives Matter movement and related groups, issued a detailed policy platform denouncing what it called "corporate-backed," "market driven" "privatization" in school reform, and helped set off a furor over this question.

Farmer Paul Sangha checks out blueberry plants on his farm. He is one of about 100 Sikh berry farmers in Whatcom County.
KUOW Photo/Sarah Eden Wallace

Two thirds of the raspberries grown in the U.S. come out of the soil in Whatcom County, Washington.  And chances are, the berries you ate this summer were grown by Sikh farmers there.

Paul Sangha learned the trade from his father. Sangha is one of nearly 100 East Indian Sikhs tilling the soil just south of the Canadian border. They’re adding their own centuries-old traditions of family farming – and transforming the region.

KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Bill Radke sits down with Sharon H. Chang, author of "Raising Mixed Race: Multiracial Asian Children in a Post-Racial World."

She explains why it's important to study the experiences of mixed race people and how it relates to our broader history of race in this country.

A new study highlights differences between the races as they view the recent spate of deadly encounters between blacks and law enforcement.