Jeannie Yandel speaks with Avina Gutierrez, one of the first two Latinos elected to the Yakima City Council. The historic election comes after the ACLU sued the city for disenfranchising Hispanic voters. 

In 2012, Harvard Business professors Benjamin Edelman and Michael Luca launched a study to look at whether black hosts on AirBnB earned less than their non-black counterparts. Edelman and Luca examined the pricing strategy of all AirBnB hosts in New York City and found that, on average, non-black hosts charged 12 percent more than black ones.

Seattle City Council District 3 candidates Kshama Sawant and Pamela Banks.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Pamela Banks, a candidate for Seattle’s District 3 council seat, calls her opponent "Budget Rally."

Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott has fired Senior Deputy Ben Fields over the white deputy's violent arrest of a black student at a South Carolina high school, which was filmed by several students. Lott said Fields broke department policy in the arrest.

"It's not what I expect from my deputies, and it's not what I tolerate from my deputies," Lott said.

The sheriff said he's glad students documented the arrest with videos, which he said were helpful in reviewing the case.

We've updated our earlier post with the news.

Howard Lake, north of Stehekin in Washington's North Cascades.
Courtesy of Mike Annee

A lake in the North Cascades should be renamed Howard Lake after a black prospector, the National Park Service said Thursday afternoon in a reversal of its position.

A mural on Jackson Street in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC BY NC ND)/http://bit.ly/1W5d0P4

David Hyde speaks with Vivian Phillips, director of marketing and communication for the Seattle Theatre Group, about her thoughts on saving the African-American identity of the Central District by making it Seattle's next arts and culture district. 

Jeannie Yandel talks with Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation, about the role of professional sports in conversations about race, gender and social justice.

Karen Taylor works to prevent youth of color from ending up in prison, as she did.
Courtesy of Karen Taylor

Karen Taylor is at a park near where she grew up in Renton. She comes here to pray and to walk. "My mother used to walk this trail," she said. "It's a nice place. Quiet. Serene."

Taylor's childhood here was anything but serene.

Poor and minority students in Washington state are more likely to be labeled truants. That’s a according to the state’s 2015 Truancy Report out Wednesday.

This Adoptee Went Back To China But Couldn't Connect

Oct 7, 2015
Lydia Nasser in China: “This was just me standing alone, Lydia and China.”
Courtesy of Lydia Nasser

Lydia Nasser celebrated her 19th birthday on July 17, but she doesn’t actually know when she was born.

“I could’ve been born anywhere between the 15th and like the 20th," Nasser explained. “Sometimes it’s funny thinking about that. It never affects me in a bad way, it’s just a question mark in my life.”

Nasser doesn’t know her birth date because when she was 2, her parents adopted her from China and brought her back to Washington state, where she has lived ever since.

Jeannie Yandel talks to University of Washington professor Ralina Joseph about the University of Washington's Center for Communication, Differences and Equity

Author Walter Mosley and his father in front of their home in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles.

People usually remember as far back as the generation that raises them, says writer Walter Mosley.

Mosley had come into KUOW’s studios to speak with KUOW’s Ross Reynolds. It was 1992, and his third book, "White Butterfly," had just been published.

Easy Rawlins, Mosley’s main character, emerged from those memories. Easy was a fixer, a guy who does favors for people.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.



Ross Reynolds speaks with Martin Friedman, an anti-racist organizer and co-facilitator of Undoing Racism workshops with The People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, about some of the ideas that informed his own anti-racist organizing.

Anelise Moon-Schruder, 24, shown here in her Lake City apartment, is part of the white anti-racist movement.
Paul Kiefer

On a warm evening in Seattle's Volunteer Park, Anelise Moon-Schruder speaks to an audience of around 50 people. Most of them are white.

"Hey, everybody, my name's Anelise," she begins, then pauses. "Man, you all are so beautiful."

The crowd laughs.